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Favorite War Movies

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Let me add a few titles that as I skimmed over the messages I didn't see:

 

"Attack" Eddie Albert and Jack Palance

"Pork Chop Hill" Greg Peck

"Screaming Eagles" Tom Tryon

"The Fighting 69th" James Cagney

"Merrill's Marauders" Jeff Chandler

"Never So Few" Sinatra and McQueen

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There are three movies (that I remember) that were very good and showed aspects of WW2 from the German perspective.

 

'Cross of Iron' from Sam Peckinpah. I've always found Peckinpah's style of ballet and destruction to be irritating and distracting, but it did'nt completely ruin this movie. And two excellent German movies 'Das Boot' and 'Stalingrad'. 'Stalingrad' was a little nasty and depressing, but I guess that was the point.

 

Regards

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Some of my favorites are: Fighter Squadron, Flying Tigers, Fighting Seabees, Wing and a Prayer, God Is My Co-Pilot, Destination Tokyo, 30 Seconds Over Tokyo, Above and Beyond...among others.

 

One spy film that is associated with war films I would say is The House On 92nd Street.

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Matt Helm, Et Alii:

 

I didn't think much of "THE GREAT RAID".

 

I'm a stickler for historical accuracy, and I thought they could have done a better job.

 

The plane used in the movie was the wrong one.

 

Where were the Japanese battle flags?

 

Also, I can't believe Army Rangers (or any Army combat unit) would waltz through the bush surrounded by enemy troops, while bunched up far too closely and having conversations!!!

 

Maybe being a soldier ruined Hollywood movies for me, because I notice stuff like that.

 

After my military service, I was a cop, so that ruined watching cop shows, for the same reason.

 

Actually, the movies aren't really ruined for me, for I still relax and enjoy them.

 

It's the folks around me who get upset when I point out the inaccuracies and improbabilities.

 

Hmmm - - - I wonder why?

 

Heh! Heh! Heh!

 

Thank you.

 

John Robert Mallernee

Armed Forces Retirement Home

Washington, D.C.

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People think I'm crazy when I point out inaccuracies in movies or if they ruin a movie for me. I wouldn't notice things like the wrong planes, unless of course the Japanese were flying Spitfires. But when History is changed or revised to influence people who know no better, I can't stand it. Or if they change History for the sake of a more satisfying ending, like Gladiator.

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Rusty, Et Alii:

 

I posted a response to your query about "PLATOON", but I don't see it.

 

Is that because I mentioned racial problems in the Army?

 

Is that a forbidden subject?

 

Thank you.

 

John Robert Mallernee

Armed Forces Retirement Home

Washington, D.C.

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writesong,

 

Unless forum policy has changed--no forbidden subjects. Nobody 'moderates' this forum. Even advertisements are removed only by complaint. At least, that is how this thing (forum) seems to operate.

 

I estimate 10 to 20 percent of my messages do not post first time--particularly if I switch between "preview"' and "edit message". If you use Internet Explorer, you may recover messages composed, but not sent to forum, by placing mouse cursor on the "down arrow" next to the "Back" button. Click on the "down arrow" and a list of 'cached' stuff will appear. Look for titles having "Support Forums: reply" and mouse click on a promising title. Your computer screen will show a 'snapshot' of the titled object. Not the message you want? Try another promising title and click on the title...you will recover your 'lost' message. Note this only works if you have not exited Internet Explorer between attempt to send and attempt to recover. If you have exited IE...it's "so long" message. Unless, you highlighted text and copied the thing to the clipboard.

 

Again, I would like to read your thoughts regarding the movie--"Platoon".

 

Rusty

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writesong,

 

Note that "read your thoughts" has nothing to do with, uhm...psychic stuff.

 

What I should have written was--read your opinions regarding "Platoon".

 

Rusty

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Rusty, Et Alii:

 

I'll try again to respond to your inquiry regarding "PLATOON".

 

Yes, I've seen the movie over and over and over again.

 

Yes, things like that really did happen in Viet Nam.

 

A lot of unbelievably fantastic stuff happened over there, so much so, that even the "PACIFIC STARS & STRIPES" newspaper reported that you could believe almost any story about Viet Nam.

 

The war in Viet Nam, a country the size of California, with varied terrain and climate, lasted over ten years, and involved over a million American military personnel, each of them doing a different job in a different location at a different time.

 

Thus, every soldiers'experience in Viet Nam would be different.

 

My war was MY war.

 

Another Viet Nam veteran would tell you a completely different story, and he would be correct.

 

Nobody was ever safe in Viet Nam, not even the guys "in the rear with the gear", as you could be killed by your own fellow soldiers, deliberately or accidentally, as well as enemy attack.

 

There was also the hostile natural environment of disease, with venomous snakes, bugs, and plants.

 

Racial animosity between black and white soldiers was a constant menace, and in fact, I observed that same racial strife throughout my Army service, not only in Viet Nam, but at every other duty station.

 

It seemed to be aggravated by apparent official Army policy seeking to placate blacks at the expense of whites.

 

Use of illegal drugs, particularly marijuana and heroin, was everywhere, and again, I observed this throughout my military service, not just in Viet Nam, but wherever I went.

 

Mostly, service in Viet Nam consisted of long monotonous hours, usually doing mundane boring chores, and just waiting for time to pass.

 

But, when something did happen, it was so quick, it was over and done before you could react, and you never saw your enemy, or got a chance to fire your weapon.

 

I'm really lucky I made it out.

 

Still in all, I'm proud I served, and yes, I'd gladly do it all over again.

 

As for the movie, "PLATOON", it's an example of how Hollywood productions are severely challenged to try and condense an entire year's individual experiences into one short two-hour program.

 

It can't depict the long hours of boredom and terror of just sitting there filthy and soaking wet, with everything in the world crawling on you and biting or stinging you.

 

The movie can't describe the stench, or what it's like when people die.

 

Sure, they show blood, but did you know that when the body dies, the bladder and bowels immediately empty?

 

That's how you check to see if someone is really dead or merely faking.

 

Thank you.

 

John Robert Mallernee

Armed Forces Retirement Home

Washington, D.C.

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"Gone With the Wind," "Since You Went Away," "MASH," "Dr. Strangelove...," "Paths Of Glory," "Coming Home," "Apocalypse Now," etc.

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I hope so, before that war becomes completely revised and Noam Chomsky's version is all that's left for posterity.

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The true story of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and it's aftermath has yet to make it to the big screen. But with with the recent declassification of secret WW2 documents the truth may yet be told.

 

A Military and congressional board of enquiry placed the blame for the tragedy of Pearl Harbor on the two US military commanders on the ground in Hawaii, Admiral Kimmel and General Short, who were accused of incompetence and subsequently relieved of command and stripped of rank. Although they were never officially court marshaled they were kicked out of the military in disgrace. Most historians (based on the evidence) believe that the blame lies with President Roosevelt and his cabinet and that Admiral Kimmel and General Short were sacrificed as scapegoats for the Presidents own incompetence.

 

Sadly, Roosevelt is one of the sacred cows of US history, and for the moment is untouchable. President Truman in the late 1940's is quoted as saying that the true facts surrounding Pearl Harbor will never be made public.

 

Regards

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I wouldn't say most historians believe the blame lies with FDR, but there's enough there to suggest that Kimmel and Short were scapegoats so that higher heads didn't roll. Whether FDR's was one of them, is a bit speculative, though, who knows. I've read a couple of books on that topic, one of them, Day of Deceit. It isn't known if all of the evidence is factual. But one thing that sticks in my mind is Stimson writing in his journal after a debriefing on the Japanese situation a week before Pearl Harbor, something like "We will be attacked by Monday."

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writesong,

 

Thank you for the reply (regarding "Platoon").

 

I watched the re-release of "Platoon" at a dollar movie theater (maybe, 1988?) with my brother and my brother's friend. My brother's friend had served a couple of years in Vietnam before the Tet offensive. I think he served as one of the "grunts"(?)...ground troops. Anyway. After watching "Platoon", I asked him what he thought of the movie--was it accurate? He kept closed mouth about "Platoon". It (kind of) surprised me--he was not the sort to keep opinions to himself.

 

I have since learned that some war experiences are (simply) not discussed to people who have not experienced the same sort of thing. I will write about two other examples:

 

One of my former roommates was a medic in Vietnam. He did not mind discussing his "Nam" experiences, up to a point. If he was drunk, he would readily talk about some Vietnam 'medic' stories, but always some things were 'off limits' discussing.

 

My other example is my mother's story. She worked in the offices of the Under-Secretary of the Army, in the Pentagon, during the years 1943 to 1946. After WWII ended, she worked as a secretary for some Army Colonel--he had commanded troops in Europe. My mother tells me the Colonel was among the first American troops to liberate concentration camps in Germany. My mother said that the Colonel would talk about fighting in Europe, but never discuss the concentration camps.

 

Again, thank you for replying to my questions.

 

Rusty

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Rusty, was that Colonel part of Easy Company? Dick Winters writes in his book that different regiments claim to be the first here and there, back then.

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MattHelm,

 

Beats the s*** out of me. I think she said he was an a**hole, or did she say that about some Colonel with an office down the hall (Pentagon)? I don't know. I will ask the Colonel's name...next time I talk to her.

 

Rusty

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Are we back to blaming FDR for WWII? Wasn't this tried some years ago? No matter what, I doubt if blame can ever be pined down to one person. As with most wars, it falls to a rather complicated series of events and people. As for Kimmel and Short, well that's the down side of being in command. When something goes wrong or right they get the blame or credit. They interpreted their orders as best they could with the information at hand. Revisionist historian are always waiting in the wings for the chance to show their version of history is the correct one and the glory that goes with it. And there are always people who want, for whatever reason, to believe it. They get a kick out of tearing down someone who is no longer here to defend themselves. Of course it's easier that way. Sacred cow indeed. And what do you know of FRD except what you read in books? Soon the generation that put FRD in office, fought and won WWII will be gone and then there will be no stopping the finger pointers.

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As far as I know nobody has blamed FDR for WW2.

 

If new research brings forth evidence that leads to a conclusion contrary to the 'Official' version of an event, then history should damn well be revised accordingly. I repeat again the word 'Evidence'. I'm well aware that there are those who try to reinterpret history based on the flimsiest evidence, or no evidence at all for their own reasons. However, your "Let it lie" attitude towards history is also troubling.

 

My main issue with your reply however is your assertion that any criticism of FDR is somehow a criticism of "The generation that fought and won WWII". This is an outrageous and ridiculous assertion and I await your apology for using such cheap tactics in your attempt to stifle an silence those who seek the truth. Then we can continue this debate on an intelligent and respectful level.

 

Of course I know nothing of FDR beyond what I read in history books. I also know nothing of Abraham Lincoln, or George Washington, or Gengis Kahn, or Julius Caesar beyond what I read in history books. But I doubt seriously that "The generation that fought and won WWII" have any more insight into the deep and secret waters of higher government than I do 65 years later.

 

Regards

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FDR was a good wartime president, but the worst we ever had politically. This country was damn close to becoming socialist with programs like the NRA. And he ran the economy into the ground creating a depression within a depression. It was so unnecessary.

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I do not see where FDR's Historians and Revisionist Historians are any better or any worse than any other U.S. President. Maybe he has a few more of them because he was elected four times. Elected by people, alot of whom, felt the Gov't was not doing enough to help them.

 

But then I don't like historians in general because they are always going around revising things for money. And then accuse each other of being "Revisionist". They carry with them things they call "Facts" which they use to confound and confuse people to the point where another historian is called in to straighten out all these "Facts". This is how they keep each other employed.

 

Metry Road.....As a member of the DOROTHY JANIS FAN CLUB, I completely agree with you that I do not see where anyone is accusing FDR of starting ww2.

 

My favorite war movie is still "AIR FORCE". I just love those old early model B-17's, and they are all over the place in this movie.

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Dear MikeDouglas

 

Nice to hear from you again. I think the current membership of the DOROTHY JANIS FAN CLUB stands at 3 members. I would offer you our secret handshake, but thats hard to do over the internet.

 

As for history, I sometimes feel that trying to make sense out of history is like trying to do a jigsaw puzzle with 90% of the pieces missing. I'm not sure that the remaining pieces even belong to the same puzzle.

 

Regards

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