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I'm surprised no one has mentioned the tiger sequence from THE WIZARD OF OZ.

 

Or the trapped on the mountain/ice cave scenes from AN AMERICAN IN PARIS.

 

Or the entire role of Peter Lorre in OUT OF THE PAST as the shady hamburger salesman.

And don't forget the deleted love scene between James Mason and Martin Landau in North by Northwest.

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I'm surprised no one has mentioned the tiger sequence from THE WIZARD OF OZ.

 

Or the trapped on the mountain/ice cave scenes from AN AMERICAN IN PARIS.

 

Or the entire role of Peter Lorre in OUT OF THE PAST as the shady hamburger salesman.

 

 

Never knew about Lorre being filmed for OOTP but having his scene cut.    Do you know what scenes would have been around that one or what city it was set in?   I would assume San Francisco since the town of Bridgeport (which I go to once a year),  is barely big enough for a hamburger stand.

 

James, I believe Lawrence was referring to the scene filmed in L.A. and at Tommy's World Famous Hamburger Stand on the corner of Rampart and Beverly Blvd.

 

Lorre is shown scarfing down one of those big juicy Tommy's double chili cheeseburgers with the big beefsteak tomatoes on it while telling Mitchum, who had ordered one of Tommy's equally good chili cheese dogs, that he should steer clear of Jane Greer because she was one crazy dame who'd bring him nothin' but big trouble if he fell for any of her BS.

 

;)

 

(...actually James, and while I suppose I COULD be wrong here, I'm pretty sure Lawrence was jokin' around and just posted his "wanna see list of lost footage" as a spoof...but let's see what he has to say once he revisits this thread and sees what we posted here, 'cause IF his post WASN'T done in jest, then hell YEAH, I TOO would sure like to see THOSE "lost scenes" MYSELF!!!)

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And don't forget the deleted love scene between James Mason and Martin Landau in North by Northwest.

 

I didn't know about that scene, but now that I do, I'm trying my best to forget about it. ;)

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I'm surprised someone hasn't posted this already--but Errol Flynn's 1954 production of " William Tell".  It was the second film he made after he left Warner Brothers (1953's "Crossed Swords" was the first);  Flynn provided half the financing, the rest coming from The Italian Government & some coming from Warner Bros.  He shot 30-40 minutes of footage, then ran out of money and could not get financing to complete the film*

 

Who knows where the footage is?  Naples, Rome, the Warner Bros. vaults?  Maybe someone will find and show it some day.

 

*---Information from Jeanine Basingers' "The Star System", 2008.

 

filmlover, that would be a fascinating find.

 

I found the following speculation about the William Tell footage at http://www.classicfilmtvcafe.com/2013/03/errol-flynns-unfinished-film-story-of.html:

 

According to some sources, the remaining footage of The Story of William Tell is stored in the archives of Boston University. Indeed, the 15-30 minutes of edited footage has become something of an urban legend. In one account, Roddy McDowell bought the William Tell footage from Flynn's widow Patrice Wymore and donated it to Boston University with the stipulation that it never be publicly shown!

 

If true, why on earth would McDowall make that stipulation? This is the film project that financially ruined Flynn and ended any hopes he had of becoming a top star once again. It would be fascinating to see what he and Jack Cardiff had been able to put on film.

 

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I've never heard of the spider pit footage either.  But it also sounds(this topic anyway) like a "careful what you wish for" sort of thing. Sort of like how they thought they were doing us a favor of some kind when, as they were re-issuing well loved and classic vinyl LPs onto compact discs, with including "previously unreleased material".  Like it was some kind of prize! 

 

Well, it turned out that after 30 seconds to a minute of hearing it, you quickly realized WHY it was previously unreleased!

 

I'd bet it'd be close to similar with this "lost footage" stuff.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I'd like to see the cut scene from FRANKENSTEIN where Fritz teaches the creature how to brush his hair and tie his boots.

 

 

Or the "Night of the Dancing Donkeys" number from BROADWAY MELODY OF 1938. I mean, who wouldn't want to see Robert Taylor wearing a Mexican peasant costume, surrounded by dancers in donkey costumes wearing giant sombreros, as he warbles out, in a bad phony accent,

 

"How I miss those hot nights in old Tia-juanaaaaa,

 

When I could dance with me burros whenever me wannaaaa!"

 

 

 

And, after all the restorations, they still haven't found the "rally of the cheese-mongers" scene from METROPOLIS.

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 a "careful what you wish for" sort of thing.

 

Sort of like how they thought they were doing us a favor of some kind when, as they were re-issuing well loved and classic vinyl LPs onto compact discs, with including "previously unreleased material".  Like it was some kind of prize........ after 30 seconds to a minute of hearing it, you quickly realized WHY it was previously unreleased!

 

Just because you don't appreciate it doesn't make it a problem for any of us.

 

We like getting the additional footage and music tracks. They don't hurt anything and they are often very interesting to see and hear. All you have to do is shut it off if you don't want them.

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"The Man Who Killed Don Quixote is an unfinished feature film project directed and co-written by Terry Gilliam, based on the novel Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes. A very personal project for Gilliam, Don Quixote is famous for being a long development hell for him, with seven unsuccessful attempts between 1998 and 2014"

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_Who_Killed_Don_Quixote

 

DonQuixote-TerryGilliam.jpg

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The lost footage from 1936's Tarzan Escapes with Johnny Weissmuller and Maureen O'Sullivan.  After a preview showing, it was deemed too scary for young audiences, so they re-shot most of the film.  I understand that the finished, released product only barely resembles the original film.  

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Although I understand the following mentioned footage isn't "lost" or "missing" and is supposedly locked away in Jerry Lewis' roll-top desk or somethin', I wonder how many of you around here would LOVE to watch what Lewis himself has described as one of the worst conceived and executed movie projects ever???

 

(...I'm of course talkin' about "The Day the Clown Cried")

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Although I understand the following mentioned footage isn't "lost" or "missing" and is supposedly locked away in Jerry Lewis' roll-top desk or somethin', I wonder how many of you around here would LOVE to watch what Lewis himself has described as one of the worst conceived and executed movie projects ever???

 

(...I'm of course talkin' about "The Day the Clown Cried")

 

I have a difficult time sitting through a "successful" Jerry Lewis film, let alone an unsuccessful one.

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Just because you don't appreciate it doesn't make it a problem for any of us.

 

We like getting the additional footage and music tracks. They don't hurt anything and they are often very interesting to see and hear. All you have to do is shut it off if you don't want them.

 

I don't recall saying the additional footage or music tracks were ANY kind of "problem".  Just that either isn't really always the "prize" that promoters hope the gullible will believe them to be. 

 

One example might be when (or perhaps if ) the footage was actually lost somehow during the editing proccess, and the movie was released to the general public without it( somehow re-edited  to still connect the story without it), then THAT lost footage is a welcome respite.  Footage that was cut for good reason that somehow and for some odd reason was kept and stored might not be such a great find.  It perhaps may be interesting to film history buffs if that footage contains rare film images of someone who over time grew to legendary status.

 

And as far as them "often" being interesting to see and hear, that would be up to the individual.  I also was relating generally, and not to any specific group of people.  Like that "we" you're obviously a part of  that doesn't mind ANY of the recovered "lost" footage or "previously unreleased" music tracks.

 

In fact, and maybe only speaking for myself, the ONLY "lost" footage I'm interested in as that missing (due to deteriation or damage of some kind)  footage that some thought replacing the empty space with  long shots of movie "stills" placed over the soundtrack ( as in some copies of LOST HORIZON or the Judy Garland version of A STAR S BORN).  Now, THAT "lost footage " would be a plus.  Or ANY "lost footage" that augments the story, and doesn't muddle it any further.

 

 

Sepiatone

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The lost footage of "The Wicker Man" (1973).

Hey, FilmLover, I can totally relate to your comment as I would always go looking for the longer version of TWW back in the day, based on what the running time was. I used to know the different times fpr each version, but have forgotten now. I had both versions [or so I thought till I read your post] and had thought that they did release a boxed set that had the additional footage which I own. Am I wrong? This was in the boxed set which was ostensibly wooden and had a latch on the side with the title burnt into the front. Please help!

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any lost footage from Attack of the 50 Foot Woman (1958) :D

Nip, you mean there is more footage of Allison Hayes calling out to Harry, or beating him up while he is dancing with that tramp, Yvette  Vickers? I'd pay to see that!

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Does anyone know if the original opening morgue scene in SUNSET BLVD. is still around? The one where Bill Holden's Joe Gillis recounts to the other stiffs the circumstances of his demise, and which supposedly caused unintended laughter from a few preview audiences, and then in turn causing Billy Wilder to cut the scene and replacing it with Gillis floating face down in Norma Desmond's pool.

 

(...'cause I'd like to see that!)

Dargo, as I recall it is included in the dvd of "Sunset Boulevard" which came out back a while ago. I own it and bought it for just that reason. It has an ambulance scene and something in a hospital maybe. I need to go root it out and watch again. Reminded me a bit of the missing footage of Kevin Costner where he plays the stiff in the opening scene of another famous film.

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Nip, you mean there is more footage of Allison Hayes calling out to Harry, or beating him up while he is dancing with that tramp, Yvette  Vickers? I'd pay to see that!

no, more exciting footage of harry in the palm of her hand. :)

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I am totally in line with you on this CG

 

KG (1933) has got to be my favorite film of all time.

Ever since I first saw it as a kid I have been mesmerized by it!

Even though I "own"  it, and have recorded it several times from TV, I am still drawn to watch it whenever it is on. I just never seem to tire of the original Kong! 

 

An incredible ground breaker in so many ways.... special effects, Willis O'Brien's stop motion animation, Max Steiner's innovative score... 

 

When I was in HS, on one weekend afternoon, I went to see a "Special" matinee showing of it at my local theatre.

It was a "restored" version at that time and included a couple of minutes of the most "violent" & "titillating," footage that had been removed by U.S. censors... You know, those controversial scenes with Kong putting people in his mouth, and stomping on them with his feet, and partially disrobing Fay Wray and sniffing her garments while on his mountain cliff.  I know, pretty tame by today's standards, but after 1934, evidently some production code puritans controlling Hollywood considered them just too risque for sensitive North American audiences to view. Thank god the UK film industry was not so repressed. 

 

Anyway, nothing on TV can compare to watching my old favorite on the really big-screen with a live audience to share the thrills, and those few added minutes of footage was a real plus!.  :)

 

Several years ago I purchased the King Kong DVD Collection and decided to use my DVR to edit in the "lost spider pit" sequence (lovingly recreated by Peter Jackson and his 2005 crew) into where it should fit in the currently most complete "restored" version.

I'm sure others have also done this, and my personally "restored" version does look pretty seamless and watchable, and will have to do until something better comes along????  

 

Here's to hoping that the original "lost" footage will eventually show up, from anywhere...  :unsure: But I sadly remember reading that after the first "shocking" test screening that Merian C. Cooper himself cut that scene and personally disposed of it, purportedly because he believed that it distracted from the films pacing, rhythm or progression, or some such rubbish. :angry: 

If so, I wonder if he ever regretted that act?  <_< 

 

If all that is accurate then only a relatively small test screening audience ever actually saw the original "intact" film. And like yourself, I would have loved to have been among those privileged few. 

But who knows? As you, and I, and Peter Jackson, and all Kong lovers continue to hope....  Maybe, one day, it may yet be discovered....  And... we may still be alive to actually see it?

Wow, Stephan it must feel great to have recreated the spider pit scene. And if they can find the missing Dreyer footage, who knows.

I think that the original King Kong is by far the most frightening for the very reason that it is not the most realistically filmed. No amount of realism can substitute for the more frightening dreamlike qualities of the original. It is like a very bad nightmare realized in slow motion. Thanks!

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CaveGirl--There is a documentary on YouTube called "The Enigma of The Wicker Man" which was released in 2001, and it says part of the film was probably permanently destroyed.  Remember the scene with the snail & Christopher Lee talking in the apple orchard?  There was a good six-eight minutes that was edited out and ended up thrown away (the studio making TWM was bought out right after production had finished--and the new owners tried to not release TWM plus one other film (Don't Look Now, 1973).  They failed.  The longest version that's available now is 102-104 minutes; but thanks to inter-studio politics, there may never be a Truly complete TWM.  The documentary says what happened better than I can. Christopher Lee, Diane Cilento, and others involved in the production of TWM speak.  Excellent documentary.  Hope I answered your question.

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