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if you could have lunch...


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How about getting Tallulah Bankhead and Marlene Dietrich together. That would really be something, wouldn't it. Or, how about Mae West and Jean Harlow.

Can I come too? Listening to the two of them dish on each other and themselves and other stars would be a hoot.

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I would like to have lunch with Audrey Hepburn she was very grounded and a great humanitarian and for the men I would like to have lunch with Humphry Bogart just to yak and find out about his acting and his life

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I really like his book, Walking With Garbo. I am reading it again. I have Garbo books open to different pages all over my house! Can't get enough!

 

I would also like to have lunch with Norma and Irving at their home with guests of their choice.

 

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GarboManiac

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Stan Laurel would be great. I'd love to talk about his insights into the comedy-making process. Still, it's difficult to imagine Stan anywhere without Babe.

I'd also toy with the idea of lunching with James Whale -- as long as he weren't too bitchy.

So, all in all, my top two choices would be Chester Morris and/or Richard Barthelmess. Just because no one seems to remember them anymore, let alone invite them to a fantasy lunch.

I'd talk to Barthelmess about working with D.W Griffith; and with Morris (who was a hell of a good actor, by the way) about most anything, although I'd secretly hope to find out whether it's true that Roland West really made a death-bed confession regarding the murder of Thelma Todd. (Surely Chet would be glad to unburden himself after all these years.)

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Boy, he certainly is. And even by TCM, it seems.

Whenever Robert Osborne introduces a film in which Morris starred (The Divorcee, say, or The Big House, or Red-Headed Woman) it seems that Mr. Morris is never mentioned, even though his performance in The Divorcee is every bit as fine as that of Norma Shearer, who won the Oscar for the film. There are words about Shearer, Harlow, Wally Beery and Bob Montgomery, but nothing about Morris, who was one of the top stars of the early talkie period. So come on, Bob (if you happen to come across this), how about some equal time for good ol' Chet.

And by the way, I didn't mean to imply in my last post that Barthelmess wasn't a hell of a good actor in his own right, but my he certainly did get miscast a lot in those early talkies. (Like in"Son of the Gods," where he's supposed to be Chinese, for goodness' sake.) But to see his work in films like Broken Blossoms or especially Way Down East is to understand what Griffith and Lillian Gish (who famously remarked that Barthelmess had the most beautiful face of any man who went before the camera) saw in him.

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Loved Chester in all the movies you listed! Well, at least we remember him!

 

You know a couple of couples I would have liked to have had lunch with, besides Norma and Irving, were Cary and Betty Hutton when their love was new. Who knows, she my have given me a priceless piece of jewelry had I made a casual flattering comment! And, it would have been fun to go out with Frankie when he was dating Gloria Vanderbuilt.

 

I would have liked to have met a couple of heiresses through connections with movie stars!!!

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Katharine Hepburn! No body else! I adore her! And she would make me laugh and it be great to hear her voice first hand! I know I'd have a good time!

Also, I know it has nothing to do with this site but I would live to meet June Carter! She was one of the nicest woman that ever lived!

You know whats awful they both died in 2003! Bad year for me!

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I agree w/ you about Ms.Hepburn, she was a very charming,well-read person, due to the same she always had plenty to talk about.She was considered very liberal for women of her time and she didn't give a darn what people thought about her.That would amke for some great conversation to accompany any meal.

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If I could have lunch with only one person from Hollwood's golden time, I would have to pick the one and only Bette Davis. Not only did she push buttons with actors , she also pushed directors . She knew what she wanted and she went for it. Now that was a woman who deserved respect. She put all of herself in all her movies. I just wish I could have seen her on the big screen.

Thank-You Bob for showing these movies and telling behind the screen

tid-bits. A big Fan

CB

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Cinemabuff, in response to your earlier query to Jack regarding Martin and Blane: They were song writers, Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane, I believe Mr. Martin is still alive, not sure about Ralph Blane. They also worked at Metro in Arthur Freed's division. Began their collaborative efforts on Broadway for 1941's Best Foot Forward, a vehicle for Nancy Walker. Wrote songs for Ziegfield's Follies and Meet Me in St. Louis among others. I love to hear Hugh Martin recount his stories of working with Judy Garland in his melodious Alabama accent. Jack, that would be a very interesting lunch indeed!

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I'm sorry for the delay, 64. I wrote a reply yesterday and when lost it when I hit "Post Message"; then didn't have time to rewrite it. :(

 

Roger Edens was a musical genius who worked as a coach and arranger for MGM. He wrote the introductory lyrics and arranged the "You Made Me Love You" number for Judy Garland to sing for Clark Gable's birthday. He taught Miss Garland how to sing "Over the Rainbow". He was a great piano player and vocal arranger. It's said that he conceived the idea of The Sound Of Music opening; to have the camera soaring over the alps to find Maria singing the opening number. He was a huge influence on the musicals of Arthur Freed. He was rarely on screen, but we see his work and influences in musicals ranging from the early 1930's into the 1960's.

 

Ralph Blane and Hugh Martin were Broadway singers in the 1930's who became a great songwriting team for MGM. Hugh Martin began doing vocal arrangements for Broadway shows like DuBarry Was a Lady; they went to Hollywood with their stage hit Best Foot Forward starring stage sensation, comedienne Nancy Walker (yes -- Rhoda's mother), among others. But they really hit their stride when they wrote the songs for Meet Me In St. Louis. After working separately for some years, they got together again to write the terrific score for the terrible movie Athena. You can hear Mr. Martin accompanying the vocal fireworks of Mr. Blane on the additional tracks of the Athena soundtrack recording.

 

I was going to add Kay Thompson to this lunch table, but it seemed a bit too greedy and she might take over the conversation; so I'll save Miss Thompson for dinner.

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