Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

THE LITTLE FUGITIVE


AndyM108
 Share

Recommended Posts

Since this movie's about to begin in 5 minutes, all I can say is:  Don't miss it.  It's the most perfect slice of life film about what it was like to be a boy in the New York City of the 1950's that I've ever seen.  I was there and I know what I'm talking about.  It's an absolute gem of a picture, and I hope they put it into the TCM regular lineup.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since this movie's about to begin in 5 minutes, all I can say is:  Don't miss it.  It's the most perfect slice of life film about what it was like to be a boy in the New York City of the 1950's that I've ever seen.  I was there and I know what I'm talking about.  It's an absolute gem of a picture, and I hope they put it into the TCM regular lineup.

Agree, I was there too, nearer the end of it though, I was born in 1953.  ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree, I was there too, nearer the end of it though, I was born in 1953;)

 

One of the most vivid childhood memories The Little Fugitive recalled was Joey's enterprising method of fundraising, which (a few years later, in Washington) we used to call "bottle collecting".  In the movie, Joey just roams around the beach, picking bottles from trash cans, crevices, and temporarily abandoned picnic areas, redeeming them for a nickel apiece in order to keep riding his favorite pony.  In Washington, we'd just grab them off of our neighborhood back porches during the day, when the occupants were off at work.  We could sometimes make a buck or two over the course of a morning, although in DC we only got two cent a bottle rather than a nickel, so we didn't have it quite as easy as Joey.  I imagine that the Coney Island deposit was set at a nickel in order to deter what otherwise might have been mass littering.

 

But what really grabbed me about this movie was the look of Joey's neighborhood.  I don't know exactly where it was, but in many ways it could have been almost any West Side neighborhood in the Manhattan of that period, before the gentrifiers took over and gave all the Joeys the heave-ho.

 

The little things all rung so true:  The clotheslines stretched across the alleys, the sidewalk graffiti evocative of Helen Levitt's photographs, the generally rundown look of the buildings and the apartment itself, the dirty T-shirts (dirty in great part because of the soot that permeated the city air), canvas sneakers and cuffed jeans....That was the New York I knew as a boy, and I've never seen any other film that depicts it with such a perfect eye for reality.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I loved this movie.

 

Here is my favorite review of it that was posted on the TCM entry for the movie:

 

"lenny

 

love this movie and think tht lenny is HOT back then idk now"

 

It was posted by "katie" on 7/29/12.

 

I presume "katie" is a young girl.

Her comments remind me of how when I was growing up some girls would say Jonathan Taylor Thomas on HOME IMPROVEMENT was "hot" rather than just saying he was "cute." 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the most vivid childhood memories The Little Fugitive recalled was Joey's enterprising method of fundraising, which (a few years later, in Washington) we used to call "bottle collecting".  In the movie, Joey just roams around the beach, picking bottles from trash cans, crevices, and temporarily abandoned picnic areas, redeeming them for a nickel apiece in order to keep riding his favorite pony.  In Washington, we'd just grab them off of our neighborhood back porches during the day, when the occupants were off at work.  We could sometimes make a buck or two over the course of a morning, although in DC we only got two cent a bottle rather than a nickel, so we didn't have it quite as easy as Joey.  I imagine that the Coney Island deposit was set at a nickel in order to deter what otherwise might have been mass littering.

 

But what really grabbed me about this movie was the look of Joey's neighborhood.  I don't know exactly where it was, but in many ways it could have been almost any West Side neighborhood in the Manhattan of that period, before the gentrifiers took over and gave all the Joeys the heave-ho.

 

The little things all rung so true:  The clotheslines stretched across the alleys, the sidewalk graffiti evocative of Helen Levitt's photographs, the generally rundown look of the buildings and the apartment itself, the dirty T-shirts (dirty in great part because of the soot that permeated the city air), canvas sneakers and cuffed jeans....That was the New York I knew as a boy, and I've never seen any other film that depicts it with such a perfect eye for reality.

The Window (1949) a Film Noir does a great job of depicting New York tenement neighborhoods also.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since this movie's about to begin in 5 minutes, all I can say is:  Don't miss it.  It's the most perfect slice of life film about what it was like to be a boy in the New York City of the 1950's that I've ever seen.  I was there and I know what I'm talking about.  It's an absolute gem of a picture, and I hope they put it into the TCM regular lineup.

This is the 2nd time I've watched the Little Fugitive on TCM. A few years ago, TCM showed 3 Morris Engel films. The Little Fugitive is my favorite. Beautiful. Brilliant film. So excited I got to see it again. Lovers and Lollipops and Weddings and Babies were also shown last time. Hopefully we won't have to wait another few years to see this gem of a film again. I grew up in NY and can say yes that's exactly what our neighborhoods looked like. Love The  Little Fugitive and Thanks TCM and MoMA for showing this treasure of a film.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since this movie's about to begin in 5 minutes, all I can say is:  Don't miss it.  It's the most perfect slice of life film about what it was like to be a boy in the New York City of the 1950's that I've ever seen.  I was there and I know what I'm talking about.  It's an absolute gem of a picture, and I hope they put it into the TCM regular lineup.

I couldn't agree more...I enjoyed childhood in the 50's as well and while not in NYC, we too knew the benefits of collecting and turning in soft drink bottles....you could save up to get an ice cream from the ice cream man.   In my neighborhood our mothers sent us out to play in the morning and we didn't return until various calls went out for lunch.   Then it was "quiet time" and then outside until all over the neighborhood fathers returned home.  Our parents would be arrested today for the freedom we experienced then...sad sad world now. 

 

Oh and one more thing I don't believe would occur today...the kindness and understanding of the "pony man" and intuitiveness in getting information so he could locate the little boy's family.   Took a lot of insight and understanding.   Don't think anyone would take the time today...and besides who sees children "free style" anymore. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...