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He is a really Great Actor, remember Lawrence Of Arabia, Lord Jim, The Ruling Class, they don't have actors like Peter O' Toole anymore. I really enjoy his potrayal of Lawrence in Lawrence Of Arabia. The defiant British Officer.

 

I recently saw Lawrence Of Arabia on TCM in all its splendor. I would love to see more O' Toole films on TCM.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Peter O'Toole is also bloody good in "The Lion in Winter"

The dialog in that is wicked. What a dysfunctional family!!! Peters face was a little more filled out and he looked really great that was. It will make you think your own family isn't so bad after all.

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The Showtime version of LION was all but unwatchable. An exercise in tedium, with Close being its chief drawback (the Slavic actress cast as Alais being the second).

 

That said, the '68 a version isn't a great cinematic experience, either, but the performances...oh, the performances, especially O'Toole's! He deserved the Oscar that year, but to whom did it go?

 

To Cliff Robertson (who spent most of his screen time talking to a mouse).

 

The cheese stands alone.

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Cinesage-

You really thought the remake was bad? I didn't like it better, but it was interesting to compare the performances between the actors--how they handled the same scenes and lines. I have to say I liked the Slavic Alais better than Jane whatever her name was--she at least seemed to have a backbone or as much as the lines would let her have.

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  • 8 months later...

He is wonderful isn't he? I'm looking forward to seeing him in the new movie "Venus". And speaking of Laurence of Arabia, when the film had first undergone restoration and was re-released for a run on the big screen...Peter O'Toole made an appearence on David Letterman's old late night show on NBC. The curtains parted and in came Peter O'Toole astride a camel! Letterman started to carry over a ladder or step stool, but Peter waved him off and proceeded to direct the camel to kneel so that he could dismount properly. He then cracked open a can of beer and gave it to the camel to drink, saying to Letterman something like, "That is what I believe is known as a Stupid Pet Trick!" A truly priceless TV moment!

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I had the pleasure of seeing it in The Senator Theater in Baltimore when it was released after the restoration. There are films that are meant to be seen and then there are films that are meant to be seen in a theater. This one was meant for a theater.

 

TV can do no justice to the scope and size of the film. I don't know what anyone's chances are but if you like the film you need to cancel anything else to see it in the theater.

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I would like to see "The Stunt Man" again. I saw it a year after it first came out and thought it had been a little overrated, but O'Toole was fine as the movie director in the movie. (I guess based on John Huston.) It was an interesting film and it should be better known.

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I would like to see "The Stunt Man" again. I saw it a year after it first came out and thought it had been a little overrated, but O'Toole was fine as the movie director in the movie. (I guess based on John Huston.) >>

 

I would sell my brother to see "The Stuntman" again. A wonderful film, shot on location at the Del Coronado down San Diego way with a wonderful performance by O'Toole and a great soundtrack.

 

An under-rated gem of film from the late 1970s/early1980s.

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Anybody seen the remake of GOODBYE, MR. CHIPS? Terrible movie. But the best acting I've ever seen. O'Toole achieves a level of depth and sensitivity I otherwise would not have believed possible. The hope, frailty and devotion he conveys have never even been equaled by O'Toole himself. Let alone by lesser performers. As others have mentioned, he also shines in MY FAVORITE YEAR, THE RULING CLASS and LION IN WINTER. A superb actor.

 

Red River

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You're quite right, Redriver. O'Toole is very endearing as Mr. Chips despite the hamfisted musical score and overproduced air of that project. Maybe people would like to see for themselves, since Goodbye Mr. Chips (1969) is being shown on Monday, Jan. 8th at 5:15pm.

 

Me, I'd like to see if Becket(1964) w/ Richard Burton and O'Toole's then wife, the good actress, Sian Phillips and Night of the Generals (1967) w/ Omar Sharif hold up in reality as well as they do in my memory. He was quite wonderful in both films, I believe. Funny, the man has looked like death for so long, but among the roaring boys of his generation, Burton, Richard Harris, and Oliver Reed, he seems to be the last man standing--and, I understand, giving a glorious performance in the new film, Venus, opposite the consummate actress, Vanessa Redgrave. Peter O'Toole must be tough as an old boot, and about as hearty too, underneath.

 

Btw, Peter O'Toole's two memoirs, Loitering with Intent: The Child & Loitering with Intent: The Apprentice are both still in print and are good, diverting reads from a colorful writer who, to put it mildly, has drunk deeply from the cup of life.

 

Isn't it time for a month or at least a day devoted to Peter O'Toole, TCM?

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Mr. O'Toole is indeed a splendid actor, and the star of some of my favorite films. He is far beyond perfect and wonderful in MY FAVORITE YEAR (which is one of my favorite films ever). I also am amazed by THE RULING CLASS, which is sadly underappreciated. (Too long and too strange for many, I suspect...)

 

It is a shame he hasn't had more truly good roles, and that he has made some of the truly, truly awful films he has. Still, I'm looking forward to seeing him (eventually) in VENUS. Has anyone seen the print ads for the film, and noticed his oddly feminine eyes? Looks like some bad plastic surgery to me...Sigh...

 

Max

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Max,

My Favorite Year is one of my favorite movies as well. I have only seen it aired once on TCM; I have requested the movie several times because I sadly missed the last half hour of the movie. I would absolutely LOVE to see it again.

Apparently, I am out of the loop with this movie Venus. What is it about? And damn... he's had plastic surgery on those gorgeous eyes??? Well, no matter... he still has the sexy British accent and the exquisite bone structure.

 

What was that movie he was in about a soldier stranded on an island, I think, and he rigged some bombs together and flew a plane or something??

Shirley

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Njteacher,

I think that you're referring to Murphy's War (1971). You can read more about this WWII story at these links:

http://www.tcmdb.com/title/title.jsp?stid=4723

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0067458/

 

Well, from the clips I've seen of Venus, if O'Toole has had recent cosmetic surgery on his beautiful baby blues, he should ask for a refund. His eyes are sad, merry, and intelligent simultaneously. They also appear to reflect every hectic day of his 70 odd years.

 

Another interesting Peter O'Toole movie that should be filed under "interesting failure" for its ambitious, occasionally beautiful, yet confused translation of the Joseph Conrad novel to the screen by Richard Brooks:

Lord Jim (1964)

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moira,

 

I'm glad you mentioned "Becket". The movie used to show up occasionally on my small screen. I wonder who owns the rights to "Becket"? Maybe, HBO...or Showtime? Peter O'Toole steals Richard Burton's scenes and Richard Burton steals Peter O'Toole's scenes...no clear winner by the end credits.

 

moira...with O'Toole and Burton on screen most of the movie, I am (sort of) amazed you remembered anybody else was in the movie. I see John Gielgud was a co-star...jeez, I don't remember him.

 

Rusty

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Rusty,

John Gielgud is one of the main reasons that I liked the movie Becket. He steals the few scenes that he appears in as the king of France. He manages to make King Louis VII both effete, wise and slightly dangerous, since in playwright Jean Anouilh's view, Gielgud is one of the more cleareyed observers of the clash between King Henry and Thomas ? Becket. He sees through the friendship of the two central figures and understands that their relationship is inevitably destructive to one another. I see that Becket is still not available on dvd and Amazon has a vhs of the movie for $40. Jeez, isn't there anyone other than us who'd like to see this movie again?

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