Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Was anyone else bothered....


Recommended Posts

You remember that little vignette (is that the right word?) that used to play at the start of every movie TCM ran of the el train?...for years and years I would listen and be lulled into classic movie watching mode as the el bumped along...around the start of the year they changed it to something more "modern" with music and graphics and I was absolutely stunned! I couldn't believe it! Even now, months later, it makes me cringe and I wish they would bring back the el! No offense to the people who made the vignette, I just don't like change! My husband, not a classic movie fanatic like myself, thinks its so funny that it bothers me so much. So I'm wondering if anyone else out there feels the same way.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, the new lead in to the films is irksome. I enjoyed the voyourestic peek into the people's windows. I take the el on the uptown #1 line in the Bronx and I catch a similar glimpse as I ride by. This was a unique symbolic way of saying to us you will now catch a glimpse of our story's characters lives. Robert Osborne and others at TCM are you listening? Bring back the el intros.

Link to post
Share on other sites

YES!Thank you! That's exactly what I mean...If they ever change the intro for Silent Sunday Nights, I think I'll have a nervous breakdown. I love that intro too. And its been playing for years, you get so comfortable with those little intros. I'm glad I'm not the only one who misses the el...:)

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are referring to the currently used graphic of the building with the slow pull back (the one that has the age warnings), yes, I liked the el train better when it did that function (that was a clip from "Somebody Up There Likes Me"). But if you are referring to the one that comes after the slow pan of the building (the one with the graphics of the taxi, and other city stuff and ends with the TCM initials), I am okay with that one because it tells me that film is owned by TCM and I think the graphics are okay.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I mean the one that comes before....I think its really the sound that the el makes as it bumps along is what I love so much. I don't know...its a weird thing to miss so much. But I also liked the voyueristic little glimpses into the windows too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

filmloverI like the "TCM owns this movie" graphic as well. I prefer it to the oblong Turner graphic with the horns. I don't know why, but I do.

 

But please TCM don't change the early morning "Sunny Side of Life" movie intro! I'm a notorious night owl who winds up staying up overnight in time to see the first movie of the new day and that "look for the Sunny side of life" jingle is rather calming and familiar. I love it.

 

And I was disappointed when TCM changed the train opening to the building one. But then I'm one of those people who romanticize trains, so that could be it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

All the paintings that were used for the Sunny Side of Life were by Edward Hopper. Check out a book of his or look online and you will see the ones they have used. I really got to appreciate his work from the TCM intro. (He is also the artist who painted the man and woman at the counter in the corner diner, which has been reused by many others including the filmed shot used for the ending of the late night intro with the neon "Open All Night".)

Link to post
Share on other sites

The website said of Nighthawks (the Up All Night diner painting)

"But of this picture Hopper said: `I didn't see it as particularly lonely... Unconsciously, probably, I was painting the loneliness of a large city.' "...The info is interesting because I have always felt that loneliness when looking at that his paintings, before I knew they were done by the same person and before the earlier post told me his name. Thanks for the info!!...I will absolutely study him some more.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I liked the el train, but I like TCM's newer vignette even better. I think it's kind of fun to have several of them. When I pull out a recorded DVD to watch, I never know which one is going to start the movie off. But whether it's the el, the skewed skyscrapers, the Sunny Side of Life, or the jazz band, I literally run to the TV like a kid hearing the ice cream truck coming down the street.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I love Edward Hopper's art, so Sunny Side of Life is my favorite TCM intro. But I've never been able to identify all of the specific Hopper works used in it. Here's what I do know, or can guess -

 

"Chop Suey" is obviously one. See Hopper's original at --

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/H/hopper/chopsuey.jpg.html

 

The image of the woman reading in the train car is adapted from "Compartment C, Car 293," painted in 1938. See Hopper's original at --

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/H/hopper/hopper_car_293.jpg.html

 

The opening shot of the rooftops might have been generated from the view outside the woman's window in "Morning Sun," painted in 1952. See Hopper's original at --

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/H/hopper/morn_sun.jpg.html

 

The final image, showing the storefront, appears to be adapted from a portion of 1930's "Early Sunday Morning". See Hopper's original at --

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/H/hopper/earlysun.jpg.html

Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the el train, brings back so many memories plus my favorite sound in the world, next to a baby's cry, is the sound of a train so it just "works" for me. Sunny Side of Life is too beautfiul to ever take off the air! Thanks for the info about the artist that I did not know. I'm going to look him up now. One ad that they do not show enough of is the TCM 'credit list' - the one where the names are 'doing something' amusing. I'm sure you know the one I mean. I really enjoy that one - "more" would be nice.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always loved that "Sunnyside of Life" segment for the Hopper-esque world it showed. But the funny thing of it is, the painting they end with of the drugstore was controversial in its day because of the Ex-lax sign in the window and what it referred to. It makes me laugh every time I see it because on one hand, I believe that TCM may be using that image as a metaphor, for those in the know, of TCM being a "relief" from regular TV, with their logo appearing in the window. On the other hand, some may remember the original Ex-lax sign, and equate TCM's logo with what Ex-lax induces. Either way, a very odd Hopper painting to use in that fashion.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...