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I'm 25. And yes, I agree that it's hard to find anyone in our age bracket who really enjoy classic films and TCM. I've tried to convert some of my friends, but they really are happier watching more modern films. To each his own, but they don't know what they're missing out on!

 

I've been in situations with people 20 to 30 years older than I, and whenever I mention my love of classic movies/stars, etc, they look at me with the most bewildered expression on their faces and say, "Wow. That's so odd." It's almost a little insulting--almost as though every 20-something should be exclusively interested in modern movies!

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Hey There

 

I am 21 !!!!

Love classics and have been collecting black and White Films since i was about 15 or so.

 

My fav actresses and actors are

 

Claudette Colbert

Irene Dunne

Norma Shearer

Jean Arthur

Joan Crawford

Robert Young

Robert Montogmery

Barbara Stanwyck

Cary Grant

James Stewart

 

And lots more.....

 

If you'd like to talk or trade movies email me at

 

Iluvirenedunne4ever@yahoo.com

 

Sidney

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It's clear you are in the minority in your age group. My 18 yr old son and 15 yr old daughter are pretty much alone in their fondness of old movies.

 

I hope you might think of older people's expressions as one of a pleasant surprise. They probably seldom come across anyone that knows anything of these movies. I'm sure once you get to talking to them they will be delighted in the conversation.

 

As someone else said - no age limits, only one's love of classic films is required. Glad you are here.

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I'm 43 and I've alway loved moies, but until the Advent of DVD rarely sought them out. I've really grown fond of Film Noir's and Westerns, I find myself mostly buying older classic films over recent ones. And I recently Subscribed to TCM even thou my Cable company uses extorsion by putting it on a special Tier for $7 a month on top of the ridiculous prce they already charge

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Our cable company doesn't even allow us to subscribe to TCM at any price! Ergo, I'm with Dish Network because they DO carry TCM. I even called the cable company to complain and they said it's our City Clerk's option to pick programming for our community. When talking to the City Clerk, she said we're presented with a programming package with no choices. So much for trying to get to the bottom of the TCM on cable dilemna!

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I'm with Dish Network, too, because I got tired of my cable company's general lousy reception and their continuously escalating price and yet downsizing of channels. Now, with the satellite, it is so much better because I think TCM broadcasts in digital. And one of the great benefits is I have the DVR receiver that Dish offers that allows recording from two channels at one time (and keeps up to 100 hours in its memory, if I want it, which I do because I find it easier to record the TCM films to DVD after I make sure looking at it quickly on the DVR that I didn't miss the beginning or ending due to a previous film running overtime or the film itself being longer that expected).

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Norma Shearer:

I'm not in my 20's, but I am so glad that there are younger people like you who love them. I've always liked old movies and my spouse only likes the old war movies. As I've lamented over the years about how there may come a day when old movies aren't shown on any TV station, my spouse's reply has been, "Well, probably so. You're the only weirdo I know who likes old movies." I don't think it's weird to like them -- at any age. What I think is weirder is for somebody NOT to love them. So, I pin my hopes on you. It's up to younger viewers like you who will keep them rolling.

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When the cable companies first started out and when the old big satellite dishes first started out, there were some strange laws that allowed the local city government to make decisions about these things and control cable TV and forbid sat TV.

 

I recall when a motel in a small town decided to by-pass the local cable company and put in a big satellite dish, with a cable running to each motel room, the local city government tried to make the motel take out the dish. I don?t remember how that was finally resolved.

 

 

Some cities banned satellite dishes all together, claiming they were a ?blight? on the city, since they were ugly. But the real reason was supposed to be the x-rated channels that people could get on sat but they couldn?t get it on cable TV. The old laws allowed the dishes in the counties, but not in the cities if the cities wanted to pass local laws against them.

 

Then they developed the small satellite dishes in the 1990s, and people started hiding them in their back yards in cities, where their cities had laws against satellite dishes.

 

Then the ?dish police? would go driving around, snooping in everyone?s back yard, trying to find out if they had a secret small dish. Some guys enclosed their small dishes inside plywood boxes, with a hole at the top, and the cops would go into neighbor?s houses trying to get high up enough to look down into the plywood boxes to see if there was a small satellite dish down inside them.

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Thank you movieman1957!

 

It's always surprising to me when I mention certain movies to older people and they have no idea what I'm talking about. I know I mentioned "Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte" to someone and they thought I was talking about Baby Jane. They didn't remember Charlotte.

 

I am in the minority of my friends, but I've just started calling myself eccentric. They tease me about being a snob. My friends enjoy those Will Ferrell or Quentin Tarintino movies. You know, cool, hip and edgy kind of humor and horror stuff. Eternal Sunshine and Garden State are pretty popular with them as well. I sat through Anchoman with my friends and the whole time I kept thinking "I can't wait to get home and watch what I taped off TCM today!" Ha!

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I'm 44 and have finally figured out that those who refuse to watch old movies think of film as produce. If it isn't new, or fresh, it's no good. Irrelevant. They are no more interested in watching an old movie than they are in reading an old newspaper. I've dealt with this attitude in people of all ages.

 

Same with black and white film. ("Whatsamatter? Couldn't they afford color film?") If its B&W, it must be old. And since its old, it doesn't matter. Or else its one of those arthouse bores. (And there they stand a 50/50 chance of being right.)

 

Classic film lovers appreciate cinema as art, as history. Those who can't watch older movies tend to want simple, passive entertainment (with lots of action) and place more importance on being current in pop culture.

 

There also seems to be some correlation between educational level and appreciation of older films. I've noticed that those who have an open mind toward classic movies tend to be more thoughtful, more erudite in general, than those who say they "just can't stand old movies."

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I love Tarantino, but "Anchorman" was just horrible. I had heard repeatedly about what a great comedy it was, so I Netflixed it (yes, "netflixed" is a verb, because i say so), and watched it with my girlfriend. Neither of us laughed once.

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I am 45 and have been a classic movie fan for many years. My stepson is in a "film studies" class in school. He said the other students and even the teacher dismiss films made before 1999 as being too old. Thankfully, I have gotten him to appreciate classic films to some degree, although its limited to mostly classic horror and "cult" films. At least it's a start.

 

Anyhow, as for me TCM and FMC are essential channels to have in my "favorites" line-up. I also rent far more classic films from NetFlix than the newer ones. I'm currently enjoying Margaret Rutherford's Miss Marple films from the early 60.

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falkfan,

It's interesting how the pendulum swings. When I took a film class in college in 1973, the only movies we watched and discussed were very EARLY films. It was, at that time, a risky move for the college and I guess it was the only way they could justify even offering a class in film. It satisfied an English requirement (I guess because we wrote about what we had seen and discussed). I remember watching Nosferatu, Metropolis, The Blue Angel, La Dolca Vita, and the other 2 or 3 slip my mind. The professor never made any mention of a film from the 40's, 50's, or 60's; I suppose being careful not to tread on non-academic ground.

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I have taken a few cinema classes in college within the last couple of years, and now they offer a lot more in cinema class, from the silent to present, each class for a specific area, the silents, or from the 1940s, gangster movies, censored movies, from directors, etc. I have taken 4 different classes and enjoyed each one of them.

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