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NipkowDisc

on svengoolie tonite

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7 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yea,   that I either lost that special amulet or forgot to bring it along is very common.   E.g. I'm watching Dark Shadows and that one is used often.   Another one is the 'don't go into that room' or 'stay in this room,,,  you will be safe':   The latter just occurred this week.     Victoria Winters,,,,  stay in this hidden secret room,,,  nope dummy Victoria goes back to the room everyone else knows she was hiding in!

Hey,  but these things are what make horror the most camp genre.    

The Mummy (1932) is one of my favorite horror films. So creepy and steeped in myth, well written and superbly acted. But it irritates me when David Manners takes the amulet given to him by Edward Van Sloan and places it on Zita Johann's doorknob. He was specifically told it was for his protection, that she doesn't need it!

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On 7/18/2020 at 6:47 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

So true.    I find myself yelling at the T.V.   "Victoria,,,,  wake up!!!".    She make one dumb move after another.

 

I could go on and on.  And it's not just Vicky. Imagine a whole town that is oblivious to vampire attacks.  Here is a dark, disturbing stranger in town that announces himself as a long lost Collins relative that everyone accepts. He is never seen in the daytime. He doesn't eat. He is often away at all hours with no explanation.  Poor Willie.

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22 hours ago, Swithin said:

The Mummy (1932) is one of my favorite horror films. So creepy and steeped in myth, well written and superbly acted. But it irritates me when David Manners takes the amulet given to him by Edward Van Sloan and places it on Zita Johann's doorknob. He was specifically told it was for his protection, that she doesn't need it!

An excellent film.  Isn't it true that amulets are often given away to somebody else's benefit? Happened in The Wolfman.

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On Svengoolie tomorrow, Saturday, July 25, 2020:

I'm not sure I've seen this film, even though it comes one of the greatest years for horror films, 1957.

the-land-unknown-1957.jpg

Henry Brandon is in the cast. He's better known for these roles (Silas Barnaby in 1934; Acacius Page in 1958). I guess our Henry went straight from The Land Unknown to playing fish families in Auntie Mame.

barnaby2.gif

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it's a favorite of mine. based on Byrd's story of flying over fertile land in Antarctica...

and shawn smith was hot!

:)

43 Shirley Patterson Photos and Premium High Res Pictures - Getty ...

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On Svengoolie tomorrow, August 1, 2020: 

One of cinema's great troubled love stories (they're not strangling each other, they're trying to suppress the urge to kiss). This is my favorite werewolf movie. Great script with some memorable lines, great cast and characters, great creepiness factor.

werewolfoflondonlarge.jpg

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And the lovely Valerie Hobson.

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And featuring two of the most delightful old dears that ever graced a movie screen.

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2 hours ago, Swithin said:

This is my favorite werewolf movie. 

It's the oldest, isn't it? Did any werewolf movie come before it?

I own it on DVD. It came with my Universal Monsters Legacy Wolf Man set.

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30 minutes ago, SadPanda said:

It's the oldest, isn't it? Did any werewolf movie come before it?

I own it on DVD. It came with my Universal Monsters Legacy Wolf Man set.

 The very first werewolf movie, titled simply "The Werewolf", appeared in 1913. It involves a Navajo woman who turns into a wolf in order to attack white
settlers.

  The 1935 "Werewolf of London" is widely cited as the first film to establish the "classic rules" of movie werewolves. It initially bombed at the box office,
but its influence has since grown and it is now considered a minor classic.

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53 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

 The very first werewolf movie, titled simply "The Werewolf", appeared in 1913. It involves a Navajo woman who turns into a wolf in order to attack white
settlers.

  The 1935 "Werewolf of London" is widely cited as the first film to establish the "classic rules" of movie werewolves. It initially bombed at the box office,
but its influence has since grown and it is now considered a minor classic.

In FW Murnau's Nosferatu (1922), a werewolf is also on the prowl outside the Hungarian inn where Hutter stays at. Since the 1913 film is lost, I think this would be the oldest surviving werewolf depicted on screen that we still have.

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The werewolf is clearly played by a striped hyena though. 

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In addition to Werewolf of London, directed by Stuart Walker, I'm quite fond of the other movie Stuart Walker directed that year (1935): The Mystery of Edwin Drood. Walker cast a few  of the same actors in both films. Zeffie Tilbury, who plays Mrs. Moncaster in Werewolf of London plays The Opium Woman in Drood. The film opens with Claude Rains waking up in her opium den.

edwindrood2.jpg

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Spring Byington supplies some comic relief in Werewolf of London:

spring-wolf.jpg

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1941's THE WOLF MAN is considered by the majority to be the ultimate werewolf movie, but there's something intriguing about WEREWOLF OF LONDON that makes it stand out on its own.

It's great fun on its own terms, and it's interesting to see Henry Hull in a rare turn as the lead.  Great supporting cast too, including Valerie Hobson and Spring Byington.

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This is an excerpt from a  review on IMDB. I think it's interesting and agree with some of it:

"This film (Werewolf of London) is always being compared with THE WOLF MAN, but nobody points out that the same actor, J. M. Kerrigan, played one of the more important supporting roles in each film - Glendon's assistant in his botany laboratory in this, and Evelyn Ankers' father in THE WOLF MAN. Also, I find the make-up for the lycanthropes here much more realistic than in the Chaney film. You can still see that it is Hull and Oland under the wolf make-up, whereas Chaney is totally unrecognizable. And the characters here remain at least reasonably human, walking on two feet, whereas in the Chaney film, while he does walk on two feet, Talbot is still recognizably human whereas the creature who bit him - Bela the Gypsy - was a pure out-and-out wolf (or maybe a German shepherd masquerading as one!). And these guys wear clothing, and even put on overcoats and hats when they go out to kill; Chaney's Talbot would not appear to, even though the first manifestation of his inner wolf shows him running around the woods in a dark shirt, whereas when he experienced the change, he was wearing a white dress shirt. No such inconsistencies in the 1935 version. Lastly, the musical score is great in THE WOLF MAN, and totally original, but the one for WEREWOLF OF LONDON, is made up of new music and old classical chestnuts, like Brahms' "Sapphische Ode" (also used in THE BLACK CAT). It is effective enough, but not the equal of the Previn-Salter-Skinner score for the Chaney opus. I grew up on, and loved, both of these films in their constant movie revivals throughout the late 1940s and 1950s (until Shock Theater and/or Chiller Theater brought them to TV starting in 1957), so anything I say critical of them is said through affection rather than disappointment or pique, but I think I actually like the Hull film just a little bit more than the Chaney one. Still, there is much to be said for any film that gives us even 7 or 8 minutes worth of Maria Ouspenskaya, so maybe we should just call it a draw."

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I saw most of this on Svengoolie last night, I hadn't seen it in years. I thought it was a very good horror film, it has been unfairly maligned as being inferior to The Wolf Man, but I think it is almost as good. The first attack scene is one of the scarier moments I have seen in a Universal classic. It shows (see below) just the eyes of the werewolf and the quick scene of him chomping down on Henry Hull's arm is pretty graphic for the time. I liked Sven's trivia, including where he clears up a legend that Henry Hull refused to sit for hours for Jack Pierce's makeup and demanded it be toned down. It turns out he asked for this because the script called for him to be recognized by the other characters while in his wolf state. For this to be believable his face could not be totally covered with hair. 

Werewolf of London' or — Howling With Laughter? | by Colin Edwards ...

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On 7/24/2020 at 10:25 PM, Swithin said:

On Svengoolie tomorrow, Saturday, July 25, 2020:

I'm not sure I've seen this film, even though it comes one of the greatest years for horror films, 1957.

the-land-unknown-1957.jpg

 

I saw this movie every day for a week in the theater when I was a small child. My grandmother worked there as a snack bar attendant and as my mother was in hospital giving birth to one of my sisters, nanny was looking after me and so parked me in the movie show every day while she worked.

The movie was absolutely thrilling to me - every single day.

I copied it from a DVD borrowed from my library a while back and it now holds a sentimental spot in my personal library.

The dinosaur pictured here was the star of the movie and is SO fake-looking now. But it convinced a little kid very well in 1957.

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On 8/2/2020 at 7:37 AM, Det Jim McLeod said:

I liked Sven's trivia, including where he clears up a legend that Henry Hull refused to sit for hours for Jack Pierce's makeup and demanded it be toned down.

Ugh as soon as I heard Svengoolie's feature I KNEW Cortlandt Hull just had to stick his 2¢ in somewhere.

I worked with Cortlandt for about 5-6 years and he is the ultimate horror fan boy, crafting mannequins of classic horror stars since he was a teen. Every picture/article about his work MUST mention his relation to Henry Hull-ho-hum.

17-Cortlandt_Ripleys_2016_NEW_MASTER_col

Cortlandt is a handsome, well spoken, charming guy on his own and doesn't need to ride his long gone relative's coattails. If you ever get the chance, his work is now available for viewing all year long at the Historical Museum. Sure beats waiting in line for HOURS in inclement weather to see it in it's original location on his front lawn. (although snaking through the little shed was scary in itself)

https://www.preservehollywood.org/gallery.html

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On Svengoolie tomorrow, August 8, 2020:

51WpzfmAgGL._AC_.jpg

Another film in the Nazi mad doctor genre, like King of the Zombies and She Demons. Apart from that, I don't remember much about it.

zombie-approaches-camera.jpg

hqdefault.jpg

 

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On 8/1/2020 at 10:14 AM, Swithin said:

Spring Byington supplies some comic relief in Werewolf of London:

spring-wolf.jpg

Never seen this one. But it CAN'T (IMHO) be as bad as that gosh-awful Warren Zevon tune!  :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

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On 8/1/2020 at 10:14 AM, Swithin said:

Spring Byington supplies some comic relief in Werewolf of London:

spring-wolf.jpg

Yes, besides Mrs. Moncaster and Mrs. Whack. 

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On 7/31/2020 at 4:16 PM, Swithin said:

On Svengoolie tomorrow, August 1, 2020: 

One of cinema's great troubled love stories (they're not strangling each other, they're trying to suppress the urge to kiss). This is my favorite werewolf movie. Great script with some memorable lines, great cast and characters, great creepiness factor.

werewolfoflondonlarge.jpg

henry-hull-werewolf-of-london-1935-unive

latest?cb=20131231172146

And the lovely Valerie Hobson.

untitled.jpeg

And featuring two of the most delightful old dears that ever graced a movie screen.

Ten years I was married to Moncaster. Ain't seen him in twenty. He run away to Australia. Oh, what a man he was. Used to come home from his work all tottered up, hit the baby with a plate, threw the gravy in the grate, spear the canary with a fork and make me black and blue from head to foot and all because I forgot to have cracklin on the pork. Here's your room, Sir.

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6 hours ago, NipkowDisc said:

now that's a TV set.

:)

hqdefault.jpg

Now THAT'S a phone!

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On 8/7/2020 at 11:25 AM, Sepiatone said:

Never seen this one. But it CAN'T (IMHO) be as bad as that gosh-awful Warren Zevon tune! 

Probably his best known record.  And you remain hard to please. :)

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On 8/7/2020 at 10:30 AM, Swithin said:

On Svengoolie tomorrow, August 8, 2020:

51WpzfmAgGL._AC_.jpg

Another film in the Nazi mad doctor genre, like King of the Zombies and She Demons. Apart from that, I don't remember much about it.

zombie-approaches-camera.jpg

hqdefault.jpg

 

that's not really all that bad a movie. I think I might watch it. some mad scientist turns recently dead guys into radioactive zombie-robots.

the film could of used a dead wife surprising her husband.

:D

 

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