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Straight Films That Are Actually Gay.


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What always bothered me about this movie is how unrealistic parts of it was. Clearly the Cascades distinctively appear in the background rather than the Appalachians and you know these guys can't make a hunting vacation that many miles away from Pennsylvania in such a short time-frame. I know so many LOVE this film and consider it a classic, but my opinions of it resemble other Best Pics like BRAVEHEART (another fan favorite I get hit with tomatoes over) that had so much better competition against it. However we can start on a whole new topic on seemingly heterosexual "bromances" built on getting drunk and naked with this film included. We can even get into TOP GUN as well where Kelly McGillis serves as the "beard" to make sure all of the guys stay on the "straight" and narrow when they are bro-bonding. 1980s cinema is particularly interesting in the post-AIDS era when screenwriters were, again, trying to make "gay" invisible on screen like it was decades earlier but not doing all that successfully in their constant sea of boy-meets-girl romances dominating the market.

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"The Deer Hunter" follows the Hollywood screenplay tradition in which two men who are clearly in love with each other flirt over the same girl this goes back to the silent era and was a plot device well loved by Howard Hawks and other hyper macho directors. I had not seen the movie in years but caught in on cable - and I yes the geography might be wrong but the Vilmos Zsigmond's cinematography is stunning.  Robert DeNiro looks hot in this movie - and yes he does get that gratuitous naked drunk scene.  I had forgotten about the "bromance" between Mike and Nick who clearly were hanging out at "Brokeback Mountain " with Jack and Ennis ( hmm that would have bee a hot cross over gay ****)

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 "Midway" (2019) there is plenty of brobonding  in the spectacular War World 2 epic from gay director Roland Emmerich.  Yes the men have wives and girlfriend but they mostly stay off screen because the guys have to fight the War and spend time with each other on battleships and submarines.  The cast is filled with cute young actors  like Darren Chriss and Nick Jonas.

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11 hours ago, jaragon said:

 "Midway" (2019) there is plenty of brobonding  in the spectacular War World 2 epic from gay director Roland Emmerich.  Yes the men have wives and girlfriend but they mostly stay off screen because the guys have to fight the War and spend time with each other on battleships and submarines.  The cast is filled with cute young actors  like Darren Chriss and Nick Jonas.

The preview reminds me of Pearl Harbor (2001), which took brobonding to delirious heights. But it looks like this movie also revels in the carnage the way Pearl Harbor did, turning war into a CGI-driven spectator sport. But I guess most war movies do that to some degree, which is why it's not one of my favorite genres. I like looking at cute young actors as much as the next (gay) guy, but it loses its appeal as soon as bodies start flying into the air. The last big one (Dunkirk) used Harry Styles and the tradition of using young "it" guys to pretty up war films goes way back.

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2 hours ago, DougieB said:

The preview reminds me of Pearl Harbor (2001), which took brobonding to delirious heights. But it looks like this movie also revels in the carnage the way Pearl Harbor did, turning war into a CGI-driven spectator sport. But I guess most war movies do that to some degree, which is why it's not one of my favorite genres. I like looking at cute young actors as much as the next (gay) guy, but it loses its appeal as soon as bodies start flying into the air. The last big one (Dunkirk) used Harry Styles and the tradition of using young "it" guys to pretty up war films goes way back.

The movie is rated PG -13 so the carnage is not that graphic- yes most of the cute guys die but hey war is hell. The movie does not  have a central male love story like "Pearl Harbor" but smaller encounters that if this was porn film would have led to a gay sex scene.  The film is a action picture so even the straight romance is kept to a minimum.  The gay director might have given a us a bit more but handsome Luke Evans seems gay coded to me- he has no girlfriend and is always hanging out with a cute younger officer ; )

 

 

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"Jason and the Argonauts" (1963) what is really going on between Hercules ( Nigel Green) and  Hylas (John Carrey)?  Yes I know that Hercules mentions women before they go running off to chase the goats- but he seems really heartbroken when his twink boyfriend disappears.  The gods seems to approve their bromance ; )

 

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Now this would make an interesting movie .......

After Heracles killed Theiodamas in battle, he took on Hylas as arms bearer and taught him to be a warrior, and in time the two fell in love. The poet Theocritus (about 300 BC) wrote about the love between Heracles and Hylas: "We are not the first mortals to see beauty in what is beautiful. No, even Amphitryon's bronze-hearted son, who defeated the savage Nemean lion, loved a boy—charming Hylas, whose hair hung down in curls. And like a father with a dear son he taught him all the things which had made him a mighty man, and famous."[6

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"Ford vs Ferrari" (2019) this movie is about the bromance between car builder Carroll Shelby (Matt Damon) and hot headed driver  Ken Miles ( Christian Bale).  The setting in the ultra macho world of sports car racing so there is plenty of brobonding.  Miles has a wife but she stays at home but Shelby has no female love interest on screen.  The men have a fist fight-wrestling match which really should have led to a sex scene.  If you are more into good looking men in nice suits there are plenty of those too specially Jon Berthal who plays Lee Iacocca. 

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"Ben-Hur : A Tale of the Christ"  (1925) in this spectacular silent version Ben Hur ( Ramon Novarro) and Messala (Francis X Bushman) do not have the homosexual subtext of the 1959 remake.  But there are plenty of gay touches like the unknown extra who hangs naked in the galley. Is he being punished ? Or his derriere an enticement for the slaves?  This version is a lot fun - with all the gore during the battle scene and the very campy Iras with her outrageous costumes.  The beautiful Novarro gives a star making performance. 

 

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I favor the '25 version over the '59 version because it doesn't drag despite its lengthy running time and there is a lot more heart-stopping action. Even the chariot race in the earlier film is a lot more fun. In the later version, there is one gruesome scene on the ship with some soldier getting his limb hacked off, but the former film is far more gruesome in that respect. Where else do we see a tied up guy at the front of a ship about to be bludgeoned into another ship?

That screencap image of the naked body builder seems to have been popular in many 1970s-80s publications due to possible gay "leather" interest. Of course, nobody was seriously thinking along those lines back in the '20s. You noticed a lot of naked men in paintings depicting great suffering and misfortune, so I doubt any censors were that outraged like they would had a woman been shown full frontal. (Then again, we do see some topless-ness in a Technicolor parade sequence.)

I also favor Novarro over Charlton Heston in the lead, who was still capable of a fine performance on occasion. That is, I always liked him in Planet of the Apes. In Ben-Hur '59, he is good in his suffering moments such as the gallows scenes but is way too stuffy and overly in love with himself throughout the rest of the film. One tidbit I always find amusing is that the actors who over emphasize their "heterosexuality" are often lousy at wooing women on screen. There is zero chemistry between Heston and Haya Harareet's Esther, since the only connection they share is their love of Christ in the final act. I suspect that Jack Hawkins was more Heston's favored "daddy" type over sweaty let's-bro-in-the-sauna Stephen Boyd.

Ramon was closeted so every role had to include a female co-star and he was just as good at it as Richard Chamberlain, Rock Hudson and Monty Clift. I do find him more convincing in his wooing of Dorothy Janis in The Pagan than he is with May McAvoy in Ben-Hur, but that may be due to a stronger comfort level with Janis, much like Clift with Liz Taylor and Hudson with Doris Day. OK... if we want to get really, really technical here... I think Janis and Taylor were "hot" for Novarro and Clift respectively and wouldn't have minded having his "love child" while Day viewed Hudson as her favorite brother who made her laugh.

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10 hours ago, Jlewis said:

I favor the '25 version over the '59 version because it doesn't drag despite its lengthy running time and there is a lot more heart-stopping action. Even the chariot race in the earlier film is a lot more fun. In the later version, there is one gruesome scene on the ship with some soldier getting his limb hacked off, but the former film is far more gruesome in that respect. Where else do we see a tied up guy at the front of a ship about to be bludgeoned into another ship?

That screencap image of the naked body builder seems to have been popular in many 1970s-80s publications due to possible gay "leather" interest. Of course, nobody was seriously thinking along those lines back in the '20s. You noticed a lot of naked men in paintings depicting great suffering and misfortune, so I doubt any censors were that outraged like they would had a woman been shown full frontal. (Then again, we do see some topless-ness in a Technicolor parade sequence.)

I also favor Novarro over Charlton Heston in the lead, who was still capable of a fine performance on occasion. That is, I always liked him in Planet of the Apes. In Ben-Hur '59, he is good in his suffering moments such as the gallows scenes but is way too stuffy and overly in love with himself throughout the rest of the film. One tidbit I always find amusing is that the actors who over emphasize their "heterosexuality" are often lousy at wooing women on screen. There is zero chemistry between Heston and Haya Harareet's Esther, since the only connection they share is their love of Christ in the final act. I suspect that Jack Hawkins was more Heston's favored "daddy" type over sweaty let's-bro-in-the-sauna Stephen Boyd.

Ramon was closeted so every role had to include a female co-star and he was just as good at it as Richard Chamberlain, Rock Hudson and Monty Clift. I do find him more convincing in his wooing of Dorothy Janis in The Pagan than he is with May McAvoy in Ben-Hur, but that may be due to a stronger comfort level with Janis, much like Clift with Liz Taylor and Hudson with Doris Day. OK... if we want to get really, really technical here... I think Janis and Taylor were "hot" for Novarro and Clift respectively and wouldn't have minded having his "love child" while Day viewed Hudson as her favorite brother who made her laugh.

I agree with you is that the 1925 version plays faster- but I find the chariot race in the 59 version one of the most exciting action scenes in cinema- but I do wonder how they had the horses run over the camera in the 1925 version.  Hur 59 just sputters on after Masala's death and you are right there is zero chemistry between Haya (what ever happened to her?) Harareet and Heston.  Chuck had more sexual sparks with Hawkins specially in his tantalizing visit to his cabin scene.  But Stephen Boyd is the films secret weapon.  There are some weird things about the 25 Hur- specially the hand of Christ bit- I love how his hand goes back to wood working after he helps Hur.  There was not rating board in the 20's so I imagine that's how they got away wit the gore and the female and male nudity.  Novarro was more convincing as the young Hur than Heston- his transformation from pampered prince to religious warrior is more convincing.

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"The Werewolf" (1956)  there is a lot of homosexual subtext in this well made sci-fi horror film.  Steven Ritch plays the disoriented man who walks out of a bar and is accosted by surly stranger who demand money or perhaps something more.  The encounter is shot like a sex scene we only see their feet as they lie on top of each other- they are interrupted by a old woman who seems shocked by their behavior.  Ritch is a werewolf who runs off into the woods pursued by Don Mgowan the town's hunky sheriff. He has a girlfriend but spends a lot of time brobonding with his deputy.  Ritch was turned into a wolfman by a couple of mad scientist who act like a gay married couple .  Ritch who was a married straight man with a kid now turns into a wolfman when ever he runs into someone carrying a gun.  The gay monsters are destroyed at the end but the sheriff promises his deputy that they will get drunk for a week to recover - I'm sure they will end up in cabin on Brokeback Mountain.

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  • 4 weeks later...

There is a  gay subtext to "Damien : Omen 2" the first sequel to the successful horror film  about the birth of the Anti Christ.    Damien ( Jonathan Scott Taylor) , the son of Satan is now thirteen.  He is living with his Aunt (Lee Grant) and Uncle (William Holden ) and cute cousin Mark( Lucas Donat) .   Damien and Mark are very close which worries Aunt Marion (Sylvia Sydney ) She thinks Damien has a "bad" influence on Mark .  Marion is quickly dispatched by the raven who has taken over for the big dog  as Damien's  guardian.   Damien and Mark attend a prestigious military academy which is run by Sergeant Neff ( Lance Hericksen).   Neff seems to a bit too interested in Damien and tells him that if he has any questions about anything to ask him first. The creepy seduction scares  Damien who would rather  be running with his cousin.  Older men keep trying to get into Damien's head ( if not his his pants) like Paul Buttler ( Robert Foxworth) who tells Damien he will soon be initiated into who knows what ( Leather night at the Eagle? )  Mark discovers the truth about his cousin's parentage and wants to break up their teen bromance.   Damien seems to want to take it to he next level and is really heart broken when Mark rejects him.  It's the only moment in the film in which Damien shows any human emotion.  

 

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"Voyage of the Dammed" (1976) there a plenty of stars and subplots in this fact base film about the doomed Jewish passengers aboard a luxury liner trying to flee Nazi Germany in 1936.  Aarom (Paul Koslo) and Joseph (Jonathan Pryce) seem to be a gay couple.  They share a cabin and are always seen together.  They do not have any love scenes and their relationship is rather vague even for 70's - but it's clear they care for each other.  There are too many scenes of the Nazis beating them up but at least in the climax they do take some action.   The film is long and feels more like a mini series than a feature- lots of star power, Lee Grant, Faye Dunaway,  James Mason,  Jose Ferrer and Orson Welles.  

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" The Crimson Kimono" (1959)  Charlie ( Glenn Corbert) and Joe ( James Shigeta) brobonded during the war and now are partners in the L.A. Police department.  They share a nice bachelor pad with separate bedrooms but hey who knows what happens when one of them gets drunk.  Their bond is challenge when they investigate the murder of a stripper and meet Chris (Victoria Shaw) a painter.  "Chris" has ambiguous sexual name and flirts with both men.  Sam Fuller is a macho director so this is the familiar two "straight" men in love with the same woman triangle but they are actually in love with each other plot.  Charlie falls in love with Chris first but Joe is attracted to her too.  Joe is specially upset because he thinks as an Asian he has no right to her and almost beats poor Charlie to death during a friendly martial arts competition. This another one of those closet gay tropes in which men beat each other up instead of just having sex.

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"Jesus Christ Superstar" (1973) now looks gayer than ever.    Norma Jewison's adaptation of the Webber-Rice rock opera emphasizes the bromance between Jesus and Judas.  Judas specially acts like a scorned lover who betrays Christ more  out of jealousy than for political reasons. The disciples are attractive bunch in the last supper looks more like a prelude to a Fire Island **** than religious ceremony.  Mary Magdalene is around but Jesus doesn't seem to be interested in her in one way or another. Judas and Mary Magdalene both sing about "How They Don't Know How To Love Him" to Jesus.   The men who persecute Jesus from the Jewish priest to Pontious Pilate all seem interested in the man not the spiritual leader. Pontius Pilate is played by a gay actor which might explain his performance .  Herod's song is the most obvious gay sequence which look like something staged by Ken Russell.  Herod is a chubby bisexual dude who presides over a very flamboyant court.   The finale is staged like stage show at gay disco. 

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Intriguingly it was filmed in the late summer and fall of 1972, a few months after Cabaret hit it big at the box-office. Note that some of the shirtless guys are sporting face-paint, channeling their best Joel Grey. Also a bit of Fellini's Satyricon mixed in too. It appears that the popular trend in seventies religious films, including Franco Zeffirelli's Jesus of Nazareth, was to show everybody not on God's side enjoying life more than those who are on God's side. Oh... and Jesus must always have blue eyes.

However I was watching some vintage footage of Billy Graham's popular young people's religious "concert tour" from the summer of 1972 (held right about the time this movie started production) and noticed how up-to-date and contemporary it was with rock music and teenage boys attending with longer hair than usual. It was an interesting period... the early seventies... when being religious was considered cool and not necessarily a sign that you were overly conservative in all of your social and political views. You could still be hippy-ish.

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20 hours ago, Jlewis said:

Intriguingly it was filmed in the late summer and fall of 1972, a few months after Cabaret hit it big at the box-office. Note that some of the shirtless guys are sporting face-paint, channeling their best Joel Grey. Also a bit of Fellini's Satyricon mixed in too. It appears that the popular trend in seventies religious films, including Franco Zeffirelli's Jesus of Nazareth, was to show everybody not on God's side enjoying life more than those who are on God's side. Oh... and Jesus must always have blue eyes.

However I was watching some vintage footage of Billy Graham's popular young people's religious "concert tour" from the summer of 1972 (held right about the time this movie started production) and noticed how up-to-date and contemporary it was with rock music and teenage boys attending with longer hair than usual. It was an interesting period... the early seventies... when being religious was considered cool and not necessarily a sign that you were overly conservative in all of your social and political views. You could still be hippy-ish.

I never thought of "Satyricon" but that must have been an influenced on the visual design.   Jesus does have beautiful blue eyes.   The film male costumes are a reflection of the period- the movie was aimed at the youth audience - and they do wear that sexually ambiguous flower children look. 

 

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"The Canterville Ghost" (1944) in the middle of this delightful fantasy about group of American soldiers encountering a ghost in England- there is an elaborate dance number in which soldiers dance together- the two dancing partners are amazing but I was surprise this sort of same sex dancing was perfectly acceptable. The other gay angle in the movie is that the troops all sleep together in their period underwear.

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56 minutes ago, jaragon said:

"The Canterville Ghost" (1944) in the middle of this delightful fantasy about group of American soldiers encountering a ghost in England- there is an elaborate dance number in which soldiers dance together- the two dancing partners are amazing but I was surprise this sort of same sex dancing was perfectly acceptable. The other gay angle in the movie is that the troops all sleep together in their period underwear.

It's been awhile, but I seem to recall that the prisoners in Stalag 17 danced together too.   I think it was pretty common in times of war for those seeing action, and the folks back home, as the gender imbalance of those populations was significant.

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1 minute ago, txfilmfan said:

It's been awhile, but I seem to recall that the prisoners in Stalag 17 danced together too.   I think it was pretty common in times of war for those seeing action, and the folks back home, as the gender imbalance of those populations was significant.

Yes I think it was a reflection of the time- and female shortage during war time- but the interesting thing about the number is that there are women to dance with- the two men's boogie number is showcased- and nobody blinks

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3 minutes ago, jaragon said:

Yes I think it was a reflection of the time- and female shortage during war time- but the interesting thing about the number is that there are women to dance with- the two men's boogie number is showcased- and nobody blinks

That does put a different spin on it then.  I haven't seen the film before.

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