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Famous lines from movies


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How about this...

 

"you take the blonde I'll take the one in the turban.....grooowwwfff">>

 

Cheyanne,

 

That would be Igor (long I) to Victor Frankenstein in Young Frankenstein.

 

One of my favorites.

 

You have a Private Message by the way.

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hey dan-

 

duh i just rented this last week.....

my memory is terrible.

scarlett johansen- in woody allens "matchpoint"

i hope. cause i just put all my eggs in one basket...if this is wrong i got nothin

:)

karith

 

 

Don't apologize, karith... because you are RIGHT!!! Scarlet Johansson it is!

 

Your turn, k....

 

Dan N.

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who said this and in what movie.

 

" I'm gonna kill you. I am going to kill you. Not now. Not tonight. That would be too easy."

 

karith:)

 

 

If memory serves, this line is spoken by one of my favorite actors: Clive Owen, in the 2004 thriller "I'll Sleep When I'm Dead."

 

Cheers,

Dan N.

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No guesses lately, so I'll have to bump this one. It is really too good to die on the vine.

 

The "famous line" is:

"Oh yes. The purest Anglo-Saxons are found in the Kentucky mountains."

 

You don't have to tell me who speaks the line... because the person is uncredited. But it's a significant movie. What's the title, and WHY is it significant?

 

Here's the scenario: A Jewish-American entrepreneur is conducting a search for a certain "somebody." He suggests his wife's cousin, "twice removed." But his Irish-American assistant says, no... it has to be an Anglo-Saxon. So the impresario calls his secretary and asks where they can find an Anglo-Saxon. She answers with the above line.

 

Don't worry, this movie is not about prejudice. These are people just trying to come up with ideas that will please the American public.

 

The film is funny as hell... and it is significant for one important reason.

 

Name the film, and tell us why it is significant.

 

Cheers,

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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i know this is probably wrong, but this is all i got...

it reminds me of a movie i saw a long time ago.

i think it was "dames"

i can't remember too much about the film i was just a id when i saw it..

but there ya go

karith:)

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i know this is probably wrong, but this is all i got...

it reminds me of a movie i saw a long time ago.

i think it was "dames"

 

 

No, it's not "Dames" (1934). But at least one of the players in "Dames" -- Zasu Pitts -- also appears in the movie in question.

 

Dan N.

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A week has passed since I posted this query:

 

 

Okay, this line is short, but it's funny... especially in context.

 

"Oh yes. The purest Anglo-Saxons are found in the Kentucky mountains."

 

You don't have to tell me who speaks the line... because the person is uncredited. But it's a significant movie. What's the title, and WHY is it significant?

 

 

The correct film title is PROFESSIONAL SWEETHEART (1933). It is significant because it was Ginger Rogers' first starring film.

 

Ginger was a busy girl in 1933, appearing in ten (10!) films released that year, beginning with 42ND STREET and finishing the year in a flourish, with FLYING DOWN TO RIO, her first film with Fred Astaire. They went on to make ten movies together.

 

In PROFESSIONAL SWEETHEART, Ginger plays a spoiled radio star named Glory Eden, who is promoted by her sponsor as "The Purity Girl." But Glory doesn't want to be "pure" -- she wants to have fun, have romance, have a ball at ritzy night clubs etc.

 

To reign in her passions, her sponsor (Gregory Ratoff) conceives the idea of getting her a boy friend -- for a fee, of course. Sort of a "professional sweetheart." He recommends his wife's cousin; but Frank McHugh, as his personal assistant, jumps in with: "No no. He's got to be an Anglo-Saxon."

 

Ratoff wonders: Where can I find an Anglo-Saxon?

 

Yeah, it's that kind of movie. The higher-ups are clueless as to what is going on in the real world. They do find Glory a professional sweetheart -- Jim, played by Norman Foster, who was Claudette Colbert's hubby at the time -- but Jim truly believes that Glory is the purity girl she portrays on radio, and the two of them are married before he wises up.

 

Some very, very funny scenes in this film. It exists, it gets shown on Turner Classic Movies, but so far there's been no hint of a DVD release. Wonder why not?

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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