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Famous lines from movies


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I have only a hazy memory of this, but it sounds very familiar - was it "The Lady Vanishes?" (The acrostic referred to there is an embroidery stitch, not a crossword puzzle.)

 

 

Right on the money, Judith! "The Lady Vanishes" (1938) it is!

 

Your turn, J.

 

Dan N.

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Who said this, and in what film?

 

[Deleted]

 

Nope, scratch what I just wrote, if you read the first version of this post. I got it wrong. The memory is fading fast. I think it should be:

 

"Excuse me a moment, I've got an ear full of milk."

 

(Maybe I should check my own ears for extraneous fluids. Sorry.)

 

Message was edited by:

jdb1

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Dan's got the movie right - "Going Bye Bye," but of course the line was not said by "Laurel and Hardy." It was Ollie, who said it while attempting to keep his dignity after being doused in the ear with milk by his pal.

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Okay, let's try something new. This is a quote that EVERY true film buff knows... but a dilettante may find it difficult to identify. So let's separate the sheep from the goats, right now.

 

Here's the quote:

 

"Robert will be away for the night. I absolutely MUST see you. I shall expect you at eleven. I am desperate."

 

Who said that, and in what movie?

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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Guessing:

Joan Blondell in "Three on a Match"?

 

 

Mmm, I've never seen that one. So obviously I couldn't have taken this line from there. If the line is in "Three on a Match" -- and I seriously doubt that it is -- that would be an amazing coincidence.

 

Think of another movie.

 

Dan N.

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To summarize so far:

 

Here's the quote:

 

"Robert will be away for the night. I absolutely MUST see you. I shall expect you at eleven. I am desperate."

 

We've had some incorrect guesses, but I don't think any of them were said with any certainty... so, let's try to narrow this down.

 

The film in question is in black and white.

It was made before 1950.

The speaker is male.

 

 

Who said that, and in what movie?

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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> To summarize so far:

>

> Here's the quote:

>

> "Robert will be away for the night. I absolutely MUST

> see you. I shall expect you at eleven. I am

> desperate."

>

> We've had some incorrect guesses, but I don't think

> any of them were said with any certainty... so, let's

> try to narrow this down.

>

> The film in question is in black and white.

> It was made before 1950.

> The speaker is male.

>

>

> Who said that, and in what movie?

>

> Dan N.

>

>

Could it be "Laura" with Dana Andrews saying the line? Just a guess.

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Bette Davis in "The Letter". She wrote a letter to her boyfriend saying her husband would be gone all night, telling the boyfriend to be at her place at a certain hour, and saying that she was desperate.

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You played a trick on us.

 

Howard Joyce READS the letter that Bette Davis wrote:

 

See:

 

http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/The_Letter_(1940_film)

 

Leslie: You see, I thought none of you would believe me if I admitted that he'd come there at my invitation. You see, I was planning a surprise for Robert's birthday and I'd heard he wanted a new gun, and oh, well I'm so dreadfully stupid about sporty things and, well I thought I'd talk to Geoff about it and ask him to order one for me.

 

Howard: Perhaps you've forgotten what's in the letter. [reading] Robert will be away for the night. I absolutely must see you. I am desperate, and, if you don't come, I won't answer for the consequences. Don't drive up. Leslie. This letter places an entirely different complexion on the whole case. It'll put the prosecution on the track of - suspicions which have entered nobody's mind. I won't tell you what I personally thought when I read the letter. It's the duty of counsel to defend his client, not to convict her even in his own mind. I don't want you to tell me anything but what is needed to save your neck. They can prove that Hammond came to your house at your urgent invitation. I don't know what else they can prove, but if the jury comes to the conclusion that you didn't kill Hammond in self-defense...

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> Bette Davis' letter in "The Letter".

>

>

> You're on the right track, but no....

>

> Dan N.

 

I named the movie, "The Letter", and you said "no". But it wasn't "no", it was "yes", I was right.

 

We'll get you for that.

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I named the movie, "The Letter", and you said "no". But it wasn't "no", it was "yes", I was right.

 

We'll get you for that.

 

 

Whatever you choose to think, Dobbsy, I am NOT a liar.

 

If you scroll back to my original post, you will see that I indicated that this question was for true cinema buffs and not dilettantes. I even said: Let's separate the sheep from the goats, right now. Do you recall that?

 

And here is the quote, as I posted it in my original message:

 

"Robert will be away for the night. I absolutely MUST see you. I shall expect you at eleven. I am desperate."

 

Your first guess was -- and I quote:

 

"Bette Davis' letter in "The Letter".

 

My answer to that was -- and again, I quote:

 

"You're on the right track, but no...."

 

What did you think I meant, when I said "you're on the right track?" Did you follow up on that? Did you even read what I wrote?

 

Now, let's go back to your most recent message. And once again, to keep the matter straight, I must quote the precise words:

 

"I named the movie, 'The Letter,' and you said 'no.' But it wasn't 'no,' it was 'yes,' I was right."

 

Now then. You did NOT name the correct movie in your original answer. What you said was: "Bette Davis' letter in 'The Letter.'"

 

But it is NOT Bette Davis' letter.

 

The correct answer is: Oliver Peters Heggie (billed as O.P. Heggie), as the defense attorney, in the 1929 version of Somerset Maugham's "The Letter," starring the legendary Jeanne Eagels. He is reading back to her the content of the letter she wrote.

 

But please note that in the 1929 version, the letter includes the words: "I shall expect you at eleven." I was careful to include those words in my original message, BECAUSE THEY DO NOT APPEAR IN THE BETTE DAVIS VERSION.

 

I don't know why the scenarist(s) for the 1940 Bette Davis version of "The Letter" decided to leave out that urgent phrase... but they DID. I included it in my question, to distinguish the 1929 version from the 1940 version. And no one -- not even Dobbsy -- was able to come up with the correct answer.

 

It's possible that the urgent phrase, "I shall expect you at eleven," was omitted from the Davis film because Ms. Davis played the anti-heroine, Leslie Crosbie, with a cool detachment, unruffled at all times. Her portrayal of Ms. Crosbie was totally unlike Jeanne Eagels' portrayal, which was dynamic and frenetic during her most trying moments. It's very much in character for Jeanne Eagels' character to impose a deadline for her lover's arrival. For the Leslie Crosbie character by Bette Davis, such an imposition would have seemed undignified.

 

Here's the thing, Dobbsy: If, in your first reply to my question, you had simply said, "The Letter," then I, as a gentleman, would have been obliged to answer: Yes, that's right. It's the 1929 Jeanne Eagels version of "The Letter." But you didn't do that. You specified the Bette Davis version. And THAT, as we now see, is the WRONG answer.

 

Don't be mad. A couple of weeks ago, one of our Trivia experts, name of Judith (jdb1), posted a question about an actress who was born around the turn of the 20th century, became a big star, but didn't live very long. After a long, agonizing search during which I tried to fit all the clues to Olive Thomas (b. 1894, d. 1920), I finally gave up. Then, to my chagrin, the question was answered correctly (possibly by jdb1 herself, under an alias), and the "actress" was a DOG! Grrr, I burned when I read that.

 

But I notice you didn't write "We'll get you for that" to Judith.

 

The fact is, we have accumulated a very knowledgeable bunch of trivia experts here, and I am very glad to be sharing these groups with you. The more we lock horns, the more we learn about our beloved classic movies.

 

And that's to the benefit of all of us.

 

Cheers,

Dan N.

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