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What would you like to see on TCM?


marcncleo

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I'd like to second your vote for Roscoe Arbuckle's films, especially his 1930's shorts, made shortly before his death.

 

How about Clara Bow's last two movies, HOOPLA and CALL HER SAVAGE? Or John's Gilberts HIS GLORIOUS NIGHT? Or anything with the cute red head Nancy Carroll?

 

 

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I would like to see, cause I have never seen it, "Its Love I'm After" with Bette Davis and Leslie Howard, with support from Olivia deHavilland. I've heard it is a riot in places, and I'd love to laugh with Bette, for a change. Ive seen "The Bride Came C.O.D", which wasnt too hot, and I really enjoyed "June Bride", and since she didnt make too many comedies to begin with, I'd like to see all the ones I can.

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I second Alix's nomination of Fatty Arbuckle. He must have had something going for him to be named as the Number one Box Office King for several years before la scandal. Also, how about Mable Norman's comedies? She was also a top favorite for many years. And instead of the steady showing of Chaplin, Keaton and Lloyd, why not pop in a John Bunny short from the l900s and Harry Langdon? At one time, John Bunny was named the most famous man on earth--even more recognizable than the king of england and the US president. Give us a chance to see what made these long-gone legends so incredibly popular.

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I agree with you guys - I'd love to see Fatty Arbuckle's films too. I have never seen one, just clips in documentaries, but he looks like a funny guy - I'm sure he could hold his own alongside Chaplin, Keaton, etc. I'd also love to see some of Baby Peggy's movies. She was the number one child star in the world back in the early 20's - she was the Shirley Temple of her day. Today she's known as Diana Serra Carey, and she's a writer. She wrote a fantastic autobiography called "Whatever Happened to Baby Peggy," as well as other books. She just recently finished a biography of Jackie Coogan who was a contemporary of hers, as well as a friend. Looks like a good read.

A film that I love that TCM rarely shows is "Dinner at Eight," with Marie Dressler, the Barrymore brothers, Jean Harlow, Wallace Beery, etc. This is an all-star CLASSIC if there ever was one, and I don't think it's been on TCM for at least a year.

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MovieJoe, thanks for mentioning the unforgettable, the timeless "Dinner at Eight." This is one of my most cherished movies. In doing research on this at Lincoln Center (and some other old flicks) I was amazed at the original cast that was first announced by MGM. John Gilbert was originally cast in the John Barrymore role as the dying alcoholic. Anita Page/Joan Crawford were both named for the Madge Evans role (she's the one who has an affair with Barrymore). And get this: GARBO was announced as playing the Carlotta Vance role that eventually went to Marie Dressler. In the original screenplay, Carlotta is much more glamorous and younger and world-weary. Lewis Stone, MGM's perennial favorite, was supposed to play the dying Lionel Barrymore role. Whew! As you can see, fate was certainly playing a part in finalizing the parts for "Dinner at Eight."

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Patypancake - I agree with you 100% - The cast couldn't have been better. I'm surprised that Garbo was considered for the Carlotta Vance role. I thought the character was SUPPOSED to be an aging diva of the stage - not a young beauty like Garbo. I can't imagine anyone but Marie Dressler in that role. John Gilbert would've been ok, but his namby-pamby voice would've got on my nerves after awhile, and who's better then John Barrymore? "Dinner at Eight" is one of the few films that can be called 'perfect'.

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The number of films Hedy Lamarr made for MGM, WB, and RKO (that is, the ones we can see on TCM) is 16, just over HALF the movies she made. What about the other ones? Ones like:

 

"Ecstasy" (1933)-just mentioned here by nedlato

"Algiers" (1938)-a real good one

"The Strange Woman" (1946)-pretty good

"Dishonored Lady" (1947)-not nearly as bad as some people say it is

"Lets Live a Little" (1948)-not bad

"Samson and Delilah" (1949)-monumental!

"Copper Canyon" (1950)-worth a look

"My Favorite Spy" (1951)-very funny!

"Love of Three Queens" (1954)-or whichever of its many titles you prefer

"The Female Animal" (1958)-kinda depressing for a Hedy fan

 

And lastly, the four she made in Europe before "Ecstasy". I haven't seen these.

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I'd love to see TCM bring back 1944's Jane Eyre. I don't know why Fox has been so slow in releasing this title on DVD, but in the meantime, it would be nice to see a proper airing of this underappreciated film. I remember seeing it on The Movie Channel some 10+ years ago, and it looked a bit panned-and-scanned back then.

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"Citizen Kane" is a great movie but that an even greater one predates it by nearly ten years. This is Universal's l934 masterpiece, "The Black Cat." Cameraman John Mescall does a magnificent job lighting and photograhing all the bizarre proceedings in the Art Deco castle of Boris Karloff. Director Edgar G. Ulmer also uses his camera like a real person--it glides and peeks and captures everything in magnificent black and white. One curious factoid: before Orson Welles died, he told one of his votaries that there was one silent film that he watched repeatedly before shooting Citizen Kane. The silent movie? Louise Glaum's fabulous "Sex", made in l920 and featuring stunning photography by Charles Stumar with knockout sets, costumes, lighting and an amazing use of shadows and lights. Louise, by the way, is a knockout. I brought my copy through Grapevine Video and watch it regularly.

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My all time favorite wish I could see it is The Silver Cord. I saw this twice back in the 80's on AMC and they haven't aired it since. It's an absolutely classic precode flick and so well done. I wish TCM had the film because it's sad that such an interesting flick sits unaired.

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"The Silver Cord!" Yes! - Good suggestion! - I have only read about this old gem, and have been waiting years to see it. Hopefully TCM will get it someday. It is considered to be a top film of the early 30's. I know that Joel McRae and Irene Dunne are in it, and with Sidney Howard's brilliant writing, I'm sure it's a great film.

Another one that I've only read about but would love to see is "The Yellow Ticket," from 1931. It has a Russian theme, and I know that Lionel Barrymore stars as a Russian dignitary of some sort. Elissa Landi and Laurence Olivier are also in it. Looks like a good one, hopefully someday it'll turn up on TCM!

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One of my favorites is "Inferno". In this film Robert Ryan is at his ill-tempered best as a nasty business man who falls down a slope in the desert and breaks his leg. His wife (Rhonda Fleming) and her lover (William Lundegan) decide to leave him there to die and tell the cops he disappeared into a completely different part of the desert. Rhonda says to her lover: "We're not KILLING him exactly, we're just not SAVING him." Ryan's efforts to save himself and his discovery in a new-born faith in his own abilities make this film a true delight! Also a great confrontation with the evil pair and as a bonus Rhonda Fleming is so sexy that it is entirely believable that a guy would murder for her. Great stuff!

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I've always wanted to see:

NIGHT FLIGHT (1933) this is an MGM film, so i don't know why they don't have it listed in their library. it's not supposed to be very good, but it has a great cast: John Barrymore, Clark Gable, Helen Hayes, Robert Montgomery, Myrna Loy!

CONVENTION CITY (1933) i read in a pre-code book that this Warner Bros. film was destroyed!, but i also read on the internet that some people said they saw it in recent years. it stars Joan Blondell, Adolphe Menjou, Dick Powell, Mary Astor.

LOVE ME TONIGHT (1932) UNEDITED VERSION / all-time classic Paramount musical was originally released at 104 min. but when re-released in the late 1940s/early 1950s was edited to 96 min. because some scenes were too shocking for the censors. i read that the cut footage is lost forever.

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I was visiting another movie-related board, and was reading all kinds of warm sentiments about Laurel & Hardy, their movies, and their long-time fan group, Sons of the Desert (which I'm ashamed to say, I heard about for the first time). It made me realize how few L&H movies I've ever seen. The few I did view turned up as filler in-between TCM features (usually they'd be L&H's sound shorts). I think TCM is the perfect forum for presenting acts like L&H whose careers extend both the silent and talkie eras, as well as both short and feature length formats (much like they did with Harold Lloyd).

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My husband and I would like to see Rod Steigers "Across The Bridge". We were told in the past by TCM that this was a british production and they could not show it. But we have seen other films by the same british production on TCM. It is a fine film. Please don't let it slip by the wayside

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I recently saw on TCM a short or trailer for Bette Davis in "Beyond The Forest".

It touted this movie as a great film noir and Bette Davis at her greatest. But I have never seen this movie shown on TCM. Please show this movie as I am a Davis fan and love film noir.

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orson4ever - I completely agree with you about Laurel and Hardy. I am a HUGE fan of theirs, and it is virtually impossible to see their films anymore. You can find some of them on video, and a new DVD collection has been released of their silents, but no station ever shows them anymore. I suppose TCM doesn't own the rights to their films. They are probably owned by the estate of Hal Roach, since almost all of their films were made at his studio. I have been waiting for TCM to do some sort of tribute to them, similar to the one they did for Harold Lloyd. But I guess it is too much for them to get access to their films. And you stated that you've seen L&H on TCM - I never have - I know they used to be on AMC - back in the old days when AMC was still AMC. But it's really a shame that no station shows their films at all.

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I would like to see 1962's "Walk On The Wild Side" with Barbara Stanwyk, Capucine, Lawrence Harvey, Anne Baxter, & Jane Fonda. The setting is the French Quarter in New Orleans and the story involves the redemption of a prostitute with tragic consequences. The acting is great and who could forget the opening and closing credits with that beautiful black cat strutting across the screen to Elmer Bernstein's beautiful musical score.

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