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How did you all get into classic movies what is you story?


inglis

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I used to watch old movies with my Mother .She was a total movie buff,if she saw a movie that was going to be on T.V. I was going to watch it with her .Madame X was one of the first one's I saw and it just continued from there.Any body else out there with some memories? I would like to hear from you!

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I started out of complete boredom. My junior year in high school my part time job cut back hours. My friends at school were dating and I wasn't. So on weekends I started to watch movies. At that time they weren't all that old, 30-40 yrs.

 

While I never saw a movie 13 times in one weekend like JackBurley did there were a few where I might watch 7-10 different ones. It helped me keep my sanity. It gave me a hobby I still enjoy 30 some years later. At least it's something you can't outgrow.

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Hi there really enjoyed hearing from you ! They had these horror movies when I was a kid on Saturday night ,the show was called Chiller Thriller and that is where I first saw Creature From The Black Lagoon.Have a good day Too Many Notes

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My guess is most of us came up during the days when you saw movies on broadcast television morning, noon and night. When people ask me, "How do you know about so-and-so (Hayworth, Grable, any star from the old days) my stock answer is, "I was raised on the late show," and they understand. Its a shame broadcast TV stations have no interest in running movies anymore. There's probably some industry reason for it, but I know nothing about the TV station business. Are repertory film prints expensive to acquire? Wouldn't it be ironic if Ted Turner were to blame?

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We had "Creature Features" here in Chicagoland.

My mom wouldn't let me stay up late or watch them.

I also couldn't watch the extreme violence of

Batman or Three Stooges.

Talk about a tortured childhood.

: )

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Recording old movies from AMC for one of my sisters.

Ten or fifteen years ago? I don't know.

I'd end up watching a few while recording and, by golly,

some of them were actually pretty good.

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One summer night when I was 10 years old my mom let me stay up late to watch Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid. From that time on, I was in love with William Powell and with old movies. Channel 11 in Fort Worth used to show something out of the MGM vaults every weeknight during my high school years, which gave me a chance to see all of the Thin Man movies and many other gems, including Random Harvest, which would become my favorite and remains so. Those were the ancient days before VCRs, so I actually had to watch them while they were on! Hard to imagine now.

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On VH1 or E! I forget which... they were showing a program called "101 Pop Culture Icons and Unforgettable Moments in Pop Culture History" . I wasn't really paying attention, infact, I believe I was absently cutting paper into tiny little pieces while the commentators were rambling on about some dead people and some lame civil war movie they starred in. Suddenly, I heard a few little somethings that caught my attention, "Oh Rhett, where shall I go? What shall I do?" and "Frankly my dear, I don't give a damn". The next day I begged my mom to take me to Barns & Noble. Once there, I raced to the CD/DVD section, scanned the shelves, spotted the case, grabbed it, and ran to my mom (who was all the way in the back the store) screaming, "MOM! MOM! I FOUND IT! I FOUND IT! I FOUND 'FRANKLY MY DEAR, I DON'T GIVE A DAMN'!!!" Since then "Gone With The Wind" has been one of my favorite films and I will always remember as the one that started it all.

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Ironically, I mentioned this in another thread.

 

My interest in classic films began in the early 1980s with a night time detective series on NBC here in the States called Remington Steele. Most of the cases were solved by the other detective on the series, Laura Holt, played by Stephanie Zimbalist. When Mr Steele (played by Pierce Brosnan) solved a case, however, he often did so by referring to old classic crime detective movies. This sparked my interest in seeing them, thinking that there MUST be something to these old movies!

 

I think my interest in silent movies, however, was more for the historical aspect than the actual storyline aspects; that came later. But now, silents are, by far, my favorites!!!!

 

Larry

http://lwsroute66.proboards57.com/

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Same story as many of you (and probably millions of others). Late nights on Fridays and Saturdays we had classic horror/sci-fi movies hosted by local celebrities (similar to Elvira). I kind of identify with Ed Wood (not the cross-dressing part, but being a misfit who loves old flicks like that)

 

I also am a history buff, so that sort of goes hand-in-hand with old flicks.

 

I'm not one of those, however, that thinks all old movies are classics or even good. I absolutely hate Gone With The Wind (that's because it's more of a girls' movie) and the original Mutiny On The Bounty(because of all the gross inaccuracies and over-the-top acting) - - The Bounty -Mel Gibson/Anthony Hopkins version is the best. Same goes with old movie actors - - I'm sorry but I think Gary Cooper sucked - - the only reason I watch High Noon is because I'm desperately in love with Grace Kelly!

 

SIDEBAR if you're curious - - some of the many inaccuracies in Mutiny On The Bounty

- - All crewmembers of The Bounty were volunteers - - Bligh (or any intelligent Captain) only wanted experienced, expert, and willing crewmen for such a long, arduous voyage - - not criminals or civilians pressed into service.

 

- - Bligh never starved his crewmembers - - what good would it do if all of your crew died before completing such a long voyage. Bligh fed his crew properly, providing plenty of citrus to prevent scurvy, and he also had them exercise every day by dancing (as depicted in The Bounty). Not only did all the crewmen survive the trip to Tahiti, but none were even sick (which was unheard of at the time).

 

Well, anyway, I'm not saying these flicks are good or bad - - I just don't like 'em. Whatever you all like and gives you pleasure is great.

 

Be well, all!

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I enjoyed the film Chaplin (the biopic with Robert Downey, Jr.) and though I wasn't intending to look further into Chaplin after that, I came across David Robinson's bio on him in a secondhand bookstore and picked it up. After I finished that, I decided it was silly to know his life inside and out without having seen one of his films, so I rented The Gold Rush - that was really what started it all. After I rented/bought every extant Chaplin film I could get my hands on, I started watching TCM. This was about 6 years ago, and I've been a dedicated viewer/classic film lover ever since. :)

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I really don't remember the first movie I ever saw, it's been awhile. But my dad and I always watched movies together. We didn't get along very well most of the time, but we could get along for 2 hours or so and watch a movie. He loved "The Mummy" and that is one of my first memories. I was hooked. It was great when I was a kid, movies where on TV all the time then.

 

And when you went to see a movie in a theater, it was so special. A cartoon, a Lowell Thomas news reel, TWO movies. I did embarrass my mom a bit though when the movie "Grand Prix" was on the marquee when I was a kid. I just read it out the way it looked like it should sound, loudly, with a crowd waiting to cross the street. Dad just smiled, mom was not amused. Those where the good old days, for somethings at least.

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Hey, Larry, your andecdote about Stephanie Zimbalist reminded me that I saw her play Tracy Lord in the stage version of The Philadelphia Story back in the late '80's at the Cleveland Playhouse. She was quite good, and looked lovely in the 1940's costumes. It was interesting to see the stage version--there is an older brother character that is completely cut out of the film.

 

Sandy K

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I am wondering what it must have been like for you guys when you first got on board and wanted to connect to people . My forum was posted so I could hear how you all got into the classics so Sandy what is your story .I am here because I have been a stay at home Mom and raising two beautiful children and I love movies and wanted to see what this was all about. I am 48 years old and have missed just chatting to people I don't quite know what to make of your discussion here on this post but one would think its kind of mean spirited since my post is about how you got into movies and itseems that you are aware of it but just not answering to it .So if there is a reason for your rudeness I would like to know

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