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inglis

How did you all get into classic movies what is you story?

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I am ashamed to admit I do not remember the film that got me hooked on classic movies. Though I have been searching for it for the past 5 years and still do not know. It was a wonderful romantic/funny film and I couldn't have been more then 8. But since then I've loved classical films.

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itsart2too2, yes, didn't Wonderama look like fun? On impatience, there was a blurb recently that Americans have a patience factor of 5 minutes, give or take a minute! Hah, that's about right.

 

Thanks, savageknife, I had that site bookmarked a long time ago but lost track of it. I think Fred Hall was the guy who drew four lines on a pad and then made a picture out of them? Oh, and I remember Rootie Kazootie and the Merry Mailman.

 

Guess these Internet memories take the place of sitting and rocking on a porch, regaling all those who will listen on what it was like 50 years ago. FIFTY!!! Holy cow.

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I believe it was West Side Story that got me hooked onto the classics. My mom asked me to watch it with her when I was 14. From then on I found myself watching TCM quite frequently!

 

Angie

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Hi Angie what a great movie to get started with I saw that too when I was young .Thanks for your scoop !

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I got caught up in classic movies when my mom had the tv on and the movie Lili popped up on the screen back in the very early 60s. I was hooked between that and the Wizard of Oz . It started my love affair with the great movies of the past.

I was a lonely child not having many friends and the movies would take me away to places and people I admired, identified with and wanted to emulate.

As time went on, I saved up from my alowance and part time jobs so I could buy all the books about classic Hollywood I could find when my mom and I would haunt the Barnes and Noble book store in NY in the 1970s.

To conclude....I love classic movies, they bring me to a comfort zone of things that I can grasp onto when the real world around us gets harsh and scary and they will never let me down.

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Thanks to Stoneyburke, SavageKnife and all the rest who contributed to the greater NY television experience of the 50/60s.

 

I wrote a much longer post with a few special memories relating to all that was written, but it was lost when I tried to post it. Maybe I'll try again later.

 

Suffice to say, that you've brought back many, many very sweet childhood memories for me.

 

Don't forget the Geeba Geeba puppet from Sandy Becker!

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I first starting watching classics as a child back in the late sixties, early seventies.Back then there were only maybe three or four channels to choose from unlike the many we have today.These are the only good memories I have where I actually bonded w/ my Mom.She would fill me in on the actors, their personal info. who was with who....She knew them all,her father used to own the only theatre in the small town she grew up in so she used to spend all her free time there as a child.I became fascinated and it became a form of escape in my troubled childhood.Some of the first movies I remember are; The Imitation of Life, both versions (Claudette Colbert, Lana Turner), Madame X, Splendor in the Grass,Dark Victory, Rebecca, Wuthering Heights and many,many more.

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I was a lonely child not having many friends and the movies would take me away to places and people I admired, identified with and wanted to emulate ...... To conclude....I love classic movies, they bring me to a comfort zone of things that I can grasp onto when the real world around us gets harsh and scary and they will never let me down.

 

Well said, Romanticatheart! I couldn't have said that any better!!!! That is my sentiment, EXACTLY!

 

Larry

http://lwsroute66.proboards57.com/

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Wow! This thread has opened a cornocopia of childhood memories. Of course I remember Captain Jack, The Merry Mailman, Sonny Fox, Sandy Becker, Chuck McCann and Soupy Sales! How about Shennanigans!, Tommy Seven, Spunky and Tadpole, Colonel Bleep, Squeek and Scratch, Andy's Gang and Winky Dink and You?

 

One of my earliest memories are of the two movies; "The Legend Of Tom Dooley" with Michael Landon, and "Have Rocket Will Travel" with The Three Stooges. I always wondered why I associated these two movies together until I read that they were released as a double feature! My generation was also severly affected by "Old Yeller" and "Bambi"!

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Though I laughed when I read about Old Yeller and Bambi, it's because I always thought that those movies are too sad for childrens movies and everyone thinks I over-react. Disney has several movies where one or the other parent is lost, Bambi, Lion King....Tell me if I've forgotten any.

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Well said. I thinks it is true for alot of us things were not always happy in our lives and the movies were and are a great distraction.

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The reminiscing of children's TV fare in New York came for me at a sad time. One of my favorites coming out of Columbus, OH. recently passed away. His name was Bob Marvin and the character he played was "Flippo, the Clown" on the CBS affiliate. He had a morning show and a Saturday morning show in the 50's and later into the 70's had an afternoon show. He showed cartoons and shorter movies like Tarzan and Jungle Jim with Johnny Weismuller. One of the video clips shown on the news during the announcement of his passing included a guest visit by Captain Kangaroo.

 

The ABC affiliate had an after-school program starring a puppet named Casper, the Camel. He had a live partner named Chuck Newsome and they played cartoons. The puppeteer and voice for Casper was a man from the Dayton, OH. area named Sky Lucy. Between these and The Mickey Mouse Club and Howdy Doody, my entertainment life was complete.

 

If there are any members (or lurkers) here that remember Flippo, Channel 10 is airing a half-hour tribute to Mr. Marvin this Saturday night, 6-17, at 7:30 PM.

 

CharlieT

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I started watching classic movies when I was about 13 around 1983. They use to come on Nickeloden late at night like after midnight. And I think my first movie I saw was His Girl Friday, which to this day is still my favorite movie of all time. I loved staying up to watch the movies they brought on. And they still hold up today.

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I started watching classic movies when I was about 8 years old, back in the seventies. I started out watching the Sherlock Holmes movies with Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce. WGN, here in Chicago also showed a lot of the classic movies on their Family Classics program on Sundays. I just fell in love with the old movies and have been watching them ever since.

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> Though I laughed when I read about Old Yeller and

> Bambi, it's because I always thought that those

> movies are too sad for childrens movies and everyone

> thinks I over-react. Disney has several movies where

> one or the other parent is lost, Bambi, Lion

> King....Tell me if I've forgotten any.

 

cinemabuff, you are right, those ARE sad movies. But, a movie can be a "safe" way for kids to learn about death and dying. My dad died when I was nine years old, and I really felt like a freak for a while, especially when I couldn't go to the the father/daughter Girl Scouts square dance and other things that "normal" kids did. So, I related to books like The Secret Garden (parents die in fever epidemic), Little Women (father away at war), and movies like DUMBO and BAMBI.

 

Now, THE PARENT TRAP--that movie must've been the bane of divorced parents everywhere. Even though I love that movie! I saw an interview with Lucille Ball where she said that her kids watched THE PARENT TRAP over and over in hopes that she and Desi would get back together. Of course, they didn't. That's one of the reasons why I liked MRS. DOUBTFIRE, as silly as it was--the parents weren't getting back together, the stepfather wasn't an ogre (it was Pierce Brosnan, be still my heart!), it was about a man developing a relationship with his kids.

 

Sandy K

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I also remember watching old reruns of Topper with Leo G. Carroll in the morning. I loved them.

 

I think it came on after the Sandy Becker Show.

 

Anyone remember the cartoon adventures of Crusader Rabbit (and Ragland T. Tiger)?

 

I think that kids today would still enjoy the Might Mouse Show.

 

Yancy Derringer (with his Indian sidekick - Pahoo) was on late Sat. mornings. I loved that he had a derringer in his hat and another up his sleeve. Slick devil.

 

Don't forget the Paul Winchell Show with Jerry Mahoney and Knucklehead Smiff. I always thought his name was Smith. I never thought that Paul W, was very good at ventriloquism, but it didn't really matter. The characters were great.

 

That ventriloquism enthralled me so much that my mother got a genuine (toy) working Jerry Mahoney ventriloquist's dummy.

 

I put on a show with it for my fifth grade class at a talent show we did. I broke everyone up. The class was rolling with my corny jokes that I 'borrowed' from some sophomoric joke books. I still remember a few of them, but I'll spare you the pain. Great memories though.

 

Don't forget Courageous Cat and Minute Mouse, the Dick Tracy cartoons (with Mumbles) and Felix the Cat. I think there was one called the Professor (Or something like that) and a Clown one that came out of the inkwell (name please)

 

As far as movies, I certainly enjoyed being reminded of the Syncopated Alarm Clock. I never knew the name of that song, but it was regular sound in my childhood. The 5 O'Clock Movie, the Million Dollar Movie, The Late Movie - those were all great.

 

My mother explained who Loretta Young was when her show moved to daytime reruns. She played a different role each week. We watched that and The Thin Man series everyday, I believe.

 

Good memories.

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I don't remember Old Yeller as a sad movie. Quite the contrary.

 

As an adult, I realized why. It was shot with lots of bright daylight scenes. Those always seem so happy and positive to me. I wondered how cool it would have been to live where they were and with such a cool dog.

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Wow! Thanks for reminding me of Sherlock Holmes, I used to watch a lot of those movies myself.........Does anyone remember the Charlie Chan movies???? I bet those bring back memories.

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I remember when I was a kid watching the old Late Show on Channel 2 on Friday and Saturday nights. Saturday afternoons was either Abbott & Costello or Tarzan with Johnny Weissmuller. I also remember sitting with my entire family one night and watching the "Diary of Anne Frank" on our 13" black and white TV (I was about 10 years old) back in 1963. It was great sharing that movie with my brother and sisters and my mom, I believe that was the first time I was truly influenced by a movie. Then came the old classics like Yankee Doodle Dandy, Sargent York, Beau Geste, Holiday Inn. The new classics: Mister Roberts, Operation Petticoat, South Pacific, etc. (I know I'm forgetting some good ones) but you get the idea.

 

I remember going on a class trip to see "The Sound of Music" in the old Rialto theater in midtown New York. It was the last of the great old theaters with balconies and mezzanines. That was an experience I'll never forget.

 

Speaking of TV shows - how about Soupy Sales Show with White Fang, Leo the Lion and the corny jokes (At the door: Good afternoon sir, I'm Brown from the Sun. Soupy: And I'm pale from the lack of it). "Laffalafica, they whisper it all over Turkey." Wonderama. Loved Courageous Cat, Felix the Cat, Mighty Mouse and later Moose and Squirrel with an ocassional trip to Fractured Fairy Tales.

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When my Mom and Dad were both working during the War years, our babysitters were the Cambria and Allegheny movies in Philadelphia. My brother and I would come home from school, find 12 cents each on the table, and instructions to go to the movies. We grew up along with Warner Brothers Studios.

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I'm still a teen, but when I was very young I was only allowed to watch classic TV and movies--and kid's shows, of course, since all were usually G-rated. Catching the occasional movie on TCM snowballed and started something big. :)

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