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inglis

How did you all get into classic movies what is you story?

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> I found also that many characters

> had decent manners and had a social respect for one

> another.

 

This is a comment that I agree with wholeheartedly.

 

Welcome, kevshrop.

 

I find that the motives of movie characters are more transparent than in real life, and that movies provide me with some relief from trying to decipher the ulterior motives and complicated social workings of present-day life and people.

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Hi, I'm one of those very fortunate teenagers (17 years old) who discovered the magic of classic movies and has been hooked ever since. I recently started watching TCM and now its a daily ritual. I really enjoyed reading this thread, so I finally decided to post and tell you all my story.

 

Kevshrop said:

>Being sick at

>home from time to time also allowed me the

> opportunity to watch old movies

 

That's actually how it all started for me. About 2 or 3 months ago, I got sick and stayed home from school for the day. I've always hated watching tv because the shows they have on are all so poor, but I had such a bad headache I couldn't read. So I was flipping through the channels and found TCM. That day they were playing a lot of Doris Day movies, so I watched a few and absolutely loved them! After that I watched as many musicals and comedies as I could and just recently started acquainting myself with other genres of classic movies.

 

-Elizabeth

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I kind of stumbled on the classic movies. I watched a few over three years ago. A Streetcar Named Desire was the first I remember that hit me like a ton of bricks. The entire cast is amazing. Marlon Brando and Vivien Leigh knocked me off my feet, and I decided to watch a few others. Some of the first movies I saw on TCM were gangster movies starring James Cagney like The Public Enemy, Angels With Dirty Faces, and White Heat, Mister Roberts, The Defiant Ones, The Philadelphia Story, etc... I became permanently hooked after seeing a few days of movies during the Summer Under the Stars festival around 2004.

 

I still have a very long way to go, but I've enjoyed many films so far.

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Thanks for ressurecting this thread!

 

Hmm how did I get into classic movies?

 

There wasn't one slam dunk moment for me. It kinda sorta just happened. When I was younger I watched some westerns with my father and thought "eh this is ok stuff". Now i've never been a sociable person so most Saturdays i'd be home. Well there's a public broadcasting station in Ontario called TVO and every Saturday there's a 2 (sometimes 3) movie block called SATURDAY NIGHT AT THE MOVIES. In the olden days it was hosted by Elwy Yost whose son Graham wrote SPEED, BROKEN ARROW and episodes of the TV series "Boomtown". Anywho Elwy showcased the classic movies and had interview segments with some of the great directors and actors that ever lived. (He donated those interview segments to the MPA) I loved learning about some of the older movies and watching them.

 

Elwy's since retired and SNAM still showcases a lot of old classic movies but sometimes some newer types as well. I'd always try to watch a movie or two especially if there was a classic movie i've never seen.

 

A couple years ago I went to NYC and discovered TCM. I totally fell in love with the classic movies and hoped against hope that it would finally come to Canada and specifically Ontario which it did this past december. Let's just say i've been watching TCM nonstop and the movies are some of the most well crafted and entertaining stuff around.

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Sweetsmellofsuccess - I have a similar story. I too became a classic movie fan after watching "A Streetcar Named Desire" right after Brando passed away in 2004. I thought the film and cast were so awesome and then I started to watch other Brando films like On the Waterfront and couldn't believe what a great actor he was - and how incredibly sexy and handsome he was as well. Since then, I watch tons of classic films and find them way better than current films. I also love to watch TCM!!!!!!

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My father was the one who got me into classic films. The first films I can actually remember seeing were ones that he showed me (Harvey (1950) & Arsenic and Old Lace (1945)).

 

He was also one of the first people with a VHS recorder and constantly recorded and bought old movies.

 

When I was older, he and I used to watch films together on Sunday afternoons. I am also a musician (trumpet, guitar) I used to practice about 4 hours a day back then.

 

Running through modes and scales gets a bit boring after awhile so I would put on movies and play while watching them. Sometimes I would work on timing and phrasing around the way characters talked. Anton Walbrooks speech and delivery in "The Red Shoes" (1948) was always a great one to play along with. I would try to get all his timing and inflections on my instument.

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My mother brought home a copy of That's Entertainment! on VHS from our local library when I was ten. Instantly hooked and wanting to know more, we took out every oldie in the establishment over my summer holiday and I became saturated in everything from Robert Donat in Goodbye Mr. Chips to Joan Crawford in Goodbye My Fancy.

 

Currently I own over 800 movies on DVD and at least two thirds of that collection belong to the golden oldies of yesteryear. There's just no denying that movies were...well...different...but also, able to instill more lasting memories through art of performance and just plain art, back then.

 

Today's movies are made for the disposable age, and, as such are disposable themselves. No one will be shopping the local Blockbuster in 2060 for an Anniversary copy of James Cameron's Titanic but I venture a guess that we'll still be celebrating the 140th Anniversary of Gone With The Wind.

 

The movies haven't grown up - they've gone away, replaced by technologically proficient but artistically deficient clones that are - for the most part - flat and uninspired. We don't need more movies today. We just need better ones!

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Back in the late 70 I ws a shift worker and an insomniac. And since both Channel 9 and the ABC used to play old movies all night in those days I inevitably got to watch a lot of classic movies. So watching old black-and-white movies just seemed normal to me.

 

It was actually classic British movies that originally got me hooked, rather than Hollywood movies.

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My mom and dad where WWII vets and since their passing back in the mid 80's, watching the films of that era somehow makes me feel more connected to them since I know that these were the films that they watched before, during and after the war. Also. the stories, performances and plots were so much better than what Hollywood is putting out these days. Agreed?

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> Today's movies are made for the disposable age, and,

> as such are disposable themselves. No one will be

> shopping the local Blockbuster in 2060 for an

> Anniversary copy of James Cameron's Titanic but I

> venture a guess that we'll still be celebrating the

> 140th Anniversary of Gone With The Wind.

 

I dunno, I love classic movies and I didn't think Titanic was bad, although I'd have preferred it with someone other than DiCaprio in the lead. In fact I thought it was a great period piece that did a good job of recreating an earlier era and yet somehow making it enjoyable for younger audiences.

 

Back in 1997 I was actually rooting for the movie before its release, it had been pushed back from a summer release and every trade publication was anticipating another Heaven's Gate, or at the very least, they thought that like Cameron's The Abyss the movie wouldn't find an audience. So yeah, almost everybody expected the movie would be a huge bomb even when nobody had seen it.

 

At any rate, winners of the Best Picture Oscar typically remain fairly visible over the years, which is perhaps why Wings and The Broadway Melody haven't been entirely forgotten.

 

Oh and I seriously doubt we'll still have Blockbusters by 2060. I'm sure by that time all the movies available for home viewing will be distributed electronically through some sort of download or in-demand viewing. There's a very good chance the studios will try to cut the middleman out of the picture, if they can, so that we'll all be renting/buying/leasing movies directly from the studios' home video division.

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NZ, I agree. I watched both Cameron's Titanic and Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut once, but I would never, ever watch either of them again. However, I would watch 2001:A Space Odyssey and Casablanca over and over and over and....

 

dfordoom, my PBS station used to show the Janus films a million years ago. I remember being especially fond of those, they were always so different.

 

HollisinFairhopeAl, I absolutely agree. As was observed here, films had the opportunity to grow and improve, but instead they simply changed and not for the better. Films are now made with an eye towards the almighty dollar. I find it interesting that (in terms of a movie's life cycle) a movie trailer is made (they highlighted the Movie Voice Guy on some show last night), a movie is hyped to the nth degree, it comes out, it usually stinks, and it goes right to DVD, where (wow) extras are included and apparently some people buy it.

 

The next time we hear about the movie is when they give all the awful people connected with the movie an award on some show where some of the awful people are allowed to spew forth toilet humor in primetime and people in evening dress laugh at it.

 

Oh well, rant over.

 

Hollis, I find it interesting that both your Mom and Dad were WWII vets. You must have been very proud of them.

 

For my part, I got hooked on movies from the b/w movies on my 13 inch screen when I was a kid. King Kong is my first memory of a movie, and I cried and cried when he died. Thanks to those here, I've been reminded that I watched movies on Channels 2, 9, 11, and 13 via the Late Late Show, Million Dollar Movie and other such wonderful showcases for the movies near and dear to my heart.

 

Until I lost TCM, it was just about perfect.

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ithrowclams wrote "I find few modern actors and actresses that even compare to the older actors or actresses."

 

I think that's just because you don't want you, which is the one thing that I absolutely hate about this message board. Sure, it's a place to discuss classic movies, but nothing, it seems, after a certain point is ever given a chance by anyone. Granted, the films of the 20s through the 50s brissle with a style and technique that is sorely lacking in most of todays movies, yet even the good ones (Goodfellas, The Shawshank Redemption, Schindler's List, etc.) seem to be deliberately diminished by people who can't accept anything more or less than "the golden age of Hollywood." I'm not saying that I haven't guilty of the same thing from time-to-time (Someone tried to tell me once that Hitchcock didn't hold a candle to Steven Spielberg OR George Lucas! Imagine how **** off I got!), but to me, it always seems like there's a biased towards anything that was made after a certain point in time. However, if all you like watching is old movies, then that's something different. Personally, I am a fan of all kinds of film, and am inspired by everyone from Hitchcock, Kurosawa, and Hawks, to Scorsese, Spielberg and Scott (Ridley, that is).

 

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Vertigo22

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Do whatever you can to get TCM back! My tv is turned to cable channel 258 here in South Alabama (where I'm a relative newcomer, having arrived her last February 27th from my home town of Phila, PA) 90% of the time. I am in fact very proud of both my mom and dad. She ran a USO program at Fort Dix, NJ where troops were kept entertained before staging and deployment to Europe (and where she and my dad met) and he was a D-Day vet who earned two Purple Hearts and a Bronze Star w/cluster for service in the Normandy invasion. I miss them both still even though I lost my mom on her birthday in 1987 and my dad on their wedding anniversary ion 1989. How ironic after 44 years of marriage. Thanks for responding and I appreciate your comments. Even if we disagree on certain things, it's how we learn after all, isn't it?

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Oh, and one more thing. Stoneyburke, I don't understand how you feel that 2001: A Space Odyssey is watchable over, and over and over again. It's a brilliant film, no doubt, but I like to think of it as one of those artistic masterworks that should be viewed every once and a while, almost on special occasion. Other films that I feel belong in that category are Hitchcock's Vertigo, John Ford's The Searchers, Steven Spielberg's Schindler's List, etc.

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Depends how you define modern movies. I think of anything after 1967 as being modern, which means I absolutely adore modern movies. I'm not very fond of the Hollywood movies of the past decade though. There have been some great independent American movies, and some great non-US movies, but I think Hollywood has lost it. But there are exceptions. I really enjoyed Lost in Translation.

 

On the whole I find modern American actors annoying. Too smartass. I still think the Method had a fatal effect of American acting. Modern actors take themselves too seriously. But again there are exceptions. I think Johnny Depp is a genius.

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I just do. As has been proven here for about a year now, movies are a very personal, passionate subject.

 

I happen to really like 2001: A Space Odyssey and can watch it over and over. I find the entire movie, music and subject matter, an experience.

 

You don't understand it and that's fine.

 

Mind you, I don't tend to watch any movie over and over and over and over anymore. Thanks to my having the foresight to tape b/w movies from TCM before Cablevision kidnapped it, I now don't have to.

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Re disagreeing and learning from this board -- absolutely true, Hollis.

 

What a nice story. My father is a WWII vet, he was navigator on a C-47 cargo plane and was one of the first planes into Japan at the end of the war. I think I've shared here how the POW soldiers, almost too emaciated to climb up into the plane, wanted to know who won the World Series. The indomitable spirit of man, eh?

 

Nice story on your folks, thank you for sharing. My father also spoke of dancing with Lucille Ball (how cool!) at a USO fete.

 

As was my television, Hollis. But other than Warren William's films upcoming in March, I really am not missing TCM too much. I spent waaaay too much time taping films, and have run out of space to store them besides. It is a matter of principle, and when a corporation owned by the greedy SOB who owns the NY Knicks tries to FORCE me to get digital cable ahead of the crooked government's mandate that is FORCING me to get digital cable in 2009, I refuse to acquiesce.

 

I wasn't much of a hippy in the 1960s, so I view this as my own littler personal rebellion. Of course, the greedy SOBs don't lose anything, but I still consider it a personal victory.

 

Other than missing WW......... :(

 

But thanks to Snarfie, I have his pulchritudinous profile available with the click of a keystroke. :)

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The "Modern Era" has produced films like Ben Hur, Lawrence of Arabia, Taxi Driver, The Godfather, The Bridge on the River Kwai and Schindler's List. Witness The Lion in Winter , Reservoir Dogs, A Bronx Tale, Goodfellas, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest and there's no denying that classic films are still being produced. And with actors like Nicholson, DeNiro, Pacino, Hoffman, Streep and yes, Depp and DiCaprio more classics will show up among the drek that seems to be the mainstay of current Hollywood releases. But the "Golden Age" was the groundwork that established Hollywood and paved the way for the present day. Can you imagine where baseball would be if it weren't for Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Lou Gehrig and Jackie Robinson? Any respect paid to the "Golden Age" is more than well deserved!

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StoneyBurke, My dad was a Combat Engineer who landed at Normandy on D-Day after preparation and staging in England for almost a year. I don't know if I mentioned it but my mom ran a USO program at Ft Dix, NJ where troops were entertained before staging and deployment to Europe (and where they met!) My dad earned two Purple Hearts and a Bronze Star w/an Oak Leaf Cluster. I couldn't be any more proud of him and his service. Plus, he enlisted on his own as opposed to being drafted. I'm a Viet Nam vet serving from 69 thru 76. Like my dad I was also awarded a Bronze Star and a Purple Heart although I feel like I was only doing my job, what else can a person do when a comrade is in danger, let him die to save yourself? Not a chance. You do what you have to do, plain and simple. I have no regrets with regard to what I did during my military service. Simply stated, the Classic films of the WWII era somehow make me feel more connected to Mom and Dad since they were the films they watched. Agreed? I hope you still have your parents, I miss mine terribly. With all best regards, Hollis in fairhope, Alabama...

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I don't know how they couldn't be thought of as Modern Era films given their release dates. I guess it depends on how you define the Modern Era. When would you say it began? I'm curious to know. Thanks for responding, Hollis...

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> I don't know how they couldn't be thought of as

> Modern Era films given their release dates. I guess

> it depends on how you define the Modern Era. When

> would you say it began? I'm curious to know. Thanks

> for responding, Hollis...

 

I'd say 1967. The end of the Production Code. The release of Bonnie and Clyde. I'm intrigued as to why you'd consider 1950 movies modern? The movies of the 50s are certainly different from those of the 40s, but the movies of the 40s have a totally different feel from the movies of the 30s. To me the change after 1967 seems truly revolutionary, truly radical.

 

That's in the US. I think the modern era starts a bit earlier in Britain, with the British New Wave of the early 60s. And in Europe it probably starts around 1959, when Godard and Truffaut released their first movies.

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Hollis, I have an especial appreciation for those who landed at Normandy, and wish none of them had to lose their lives in the way they did. I am glad your dad made it back.

 

You also have my appreciation and admiration for being a Viet Nam vet. I still remain, to this day, horrified as to the way Viet Nam vets were treated on their return to the U.S. and cannot visit the wall in Washington D.C. without dissolving into tears. I see too many parallels with the current war in Iraq and hope it is soon over and all the valiant men and women there return to their respective shores.

 

Yes, agreed.

 

Although the relationship between my father and I is contentious (he still, at 91, is irascible and abusive) I do try whenever I can to connect to him.

 

Again, thank you for sharing so personally on this board.

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