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inglis

How did you all get into classic movies what is you story?

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Thanks for your entry. It does, in fact, mean a lot to me that you appreciate what we had to do. It wasn't easy and often difficult to understand but nonetheless we did what we were told to do. That's simply the way the military is. My one regret, after taking all else into consideration, is that I didn't make it my career. In that event I would have seen most films being released before the general public, just like in WWII! But, the best laid plans of mice and men oft times go astray! with respect to Mr Steinbeck. Thanks again...

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Would you say that directors and producers pushing the envelope of what was considered acceptable/moral/inoffensive was what resulted in the death of the code? I apologize for not knowing more about the history behind Hollyeood, Thanks, Hollis...

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Stoneyburke, I didn't mean to sound a bit bull-headish, regarding your feelings of 2001. I do understand where you are coming from. I feel the exact same way about my favorite movies. Some merely entertain, others visually stimulate. In my opinion, 2001: A Space Odyssey is an intensley stimulating experience to the eye. Lovely to look at. But all that doesn't necessarily translate to me as entertainment, in the traditional show-business sense. It's an ARTIST'S masterwork, such as Ford's The Searcher and Hitchcock's Vertigo. The ARTISTS stimulate, the craftsman entertain. That's just how I feel.

 

Basically, my gripe is that sometimes, whenever somebody has something good to say about "the golden age," (well-deserved, to be sure) they are content to be condescending about everything that has been made, and is still being made in the "modern" landscape of the film industry. The way I see it, the times are different for every era of film, so one She Wore A Yellow Ribbon can be compared to a Tombstone. Both are westerns, but the latter was made with the knowledge gained all the years in between. That's the thing about great art; it is constantly inspired.

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Not at all, Vertigo22. That was just me trying to be more level-headed after all of the bellicosity (is that a word?) of the past year over just such subjects. It just comes down to one's opinion on a movie they like, and people are passionate and not too often open to having their minds changed. I know I am not. The critics and the film schools and the AFI notwithstanding, we all like what we like. I still maintain that film is like Picasso. Some think he is the best thing since sliced bread. I do not!

 

But I appreciate your writing back and understand where you are coming from. I have been listening to people talk about the current Dreamgirls and how while it is an auditory accomplishment, the acting is lightweight and Hudson should in no way get an Oscar for 'acting'.

 

And I do agree, to a point. 2001 was indeed a visual and auditory experience for me, something that before that point I had never experienced. Now, keep in mind that I had my younger brother in tow and he was upset because a bird pooped on his hat, but I managed to lose myself in the movie nonetheless. And so it became a watershed moment in my life. So many movies are just that for some people, they identify with them.

 

Heck, here's another example. I was at a low point in my life when I saw Didi Conn sing You Light Up My Life in the movie by the same name, and the movie 'spoke' to me. I have since come to realize the movie was crap, but at the time it meant something to me and I remember it for that reason.

 

Of course, 2001 will never be a North By Northwest to me (now there's one I can watch over and over, moreso than 2001), and since I am no student of film, NXN/W may not even be a noteworthy film to 'those in the know'. But I happen to like that film too.

 

So, given all the disagreements here, it still all comes down to personal likes and dislikes. Film, it seems, is more available to the common man and thus generates more heated conversations than does an examination of Monet vs another Impressionist. Does that make sense.

 

But yes, you are correct, great art is inspired and it is inspiring. While I bemoan the fact that films like Teeth are being produced, I still defend their right to be produced, just as I thought the art with the poo covered Virgin Mary had a right to be displayed.

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Is there a better film than "Casablanca"? Unless it's "Key Largo" ? or "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest"? And with respect to musicals (not my favorite genre but there are some good ones,) do you know why "The Music Man" is not part of the TCM library? And do you know what's involved in bringing a film to TCM? Thanks for everything, especially the knowledge I've gained from corresponding with you.

..

Hollis

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Where would you rank "Red River" with respect to westerns? I think it might just be the best I've come across. Both John Wayne and Montgomery Clift" gave superb performances...

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Hollis, I consider Casablanca one of the greats. Some here and some writers do not. But I also have decided that is their right because that is their opinion. It is more peaceful to just talk about why a certain film is beloved to one.

 

For me, I can't even fully explain it. I do know that Ingrid Berman looked like my mother when she was young but that isn't it. Ingrid was also achingly lovely in Notorious, and her kiss with Grant had more fire than her kisses with Bogey. However, Bogey's kisses with Bacall in To Have Or Have Not fairly melted the celluloid (no, I'm not sure that's the right medium).

 

But Casablanca still appealed to me on a Cro-Magnon level. As does Wizard Of Oz, which is my number one favorite movie in all the world, always was and still is, even after seeing all the movies I have seen on TCM.

 

I love Murder My Sweet and I don't understand The Maltese Falcon, still to this day. I like North by Northwest very much, and that is saying a lot for me because I don't like movies in color.

 

I love the Charlie Chan movies but am lukewarm on the Moto movies.

 

Thanks to TCM, I found Warren William and want to marry him if I get to the same afterlife place where he is.

 

All of this just in answer to your first question, and again, it's just my personal feelings.

 

Holy cow, I didn't realize you meant me when you referred to knowledge! I'm not being disingenuous, but I am not one of the better brains on movies here. But Thank You!!! :) I think you're very nice as well.

 

As to bringing a movie to TCM, I believe there are those here who have done it. And some of those on here with film knowledge will blow your mind. I'm not sure when you joined, but if you search on some topics or words that interest you, their posts will make good reading.

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Hollis,

 

When Ted Turner owned TCM and its film library, the film library consisted of all RKO films, pre-1949 Warner Bros films, and pre-1986 MGM films.

 

However, Turner did the merge with Time Warner back in the late 1990s/early 2000s, the film library came under the care and handling of Warner Brothers Studios. For the first time in more than thirty years, the Warners film library was reunited.

 

According to a post from TCMProgrammr about a year ago, TCM now has to rent/lease evry film it shows TCM probably has some sort of "deal, deal" (as Don Rickles would say) with WBros for showing films originally owned by TCM and possibly films from the rest of the WBros library.

 

TCM recently cemented a great deal (from the looks of things) with Sony to show films from the Columbia Studios film library, also things seem to be warming up between Paramount (maybe that regime change was good for something) and TCM and Universal and TCM. Even Disney seems to have joined the 21st century because we are being treated to live action films from the Disney classic library.

 

20th Century Fox has its own movie channel - FMC- and so TCM only rarely (it seems) gets films from Fox.

 

There are a couple of ways to suggest movies for TCM to run. One is the Suggest a Movie tab at the top of the page of the website. Many posters have said that TCM is now running films that they have requested via this tab.

 

Also, those who participate in the TCM Programming Challenge (a new one has started), have had many of our ideas from the last four challenges appear on the TCM schedule as well.

 

It can be complicated trying to keep all the studios and who owns what clear in one's mind. I have a cheat sheet that I put together on my computer desktop so I don't get confused.

 

Welcome and hope that helps!

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Vertigo,

 

I totally agree with you in regards to the message boards and modern films. I have been railing about it off and on for almost a year now. It is one of the quirks of this board that I just don't understand.

 

We are all here because we love classic films and some of us because we love film. I don't understand the need to make a point about how great classic films are by dissing films of today. Classic films (and actors and craftspeople) are great. But there have been some great films made in the last forty years, the last thirty years and so one. There were some great films made in 2006.

 

Hollywood didn't stop making great films when they stopped making black and white films, nor when the code died nor when the studio system finally gasped its last breath.

 

If they had, films wouldn't still be made. Granted, a great deal has changed about movie making (especially from the corporate, blockbuster mentality that runs the game today) in the last twenty five years, yet filmmakers working for studios and working independently still manage to make good films.

 

Anyone who does these days deserves applause because the bottom line is making movies isn't easy.

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I got into classic movies when I was about 10, that was 52 years ago, when Mom was too busy in the kitchen to check out what I was watching on the 3:00 afternoon movie. That is about the time-frame that I saw many of TCM's offerings for the first time. As years passed I got into the various 'fad' movies, like sci-fi, war, and musicals, but since my teen years were pretty short due to marriage at 17, my life filled with diapers in the 60's, so I relied on cable to see the newer ones, but I soon found myself preferring the afternoon, or late night re-runs even with the commercials. Having seen approximately 7 decades of movies now, I see the changes that have come about more readily than some. Each decade brought new ideas, and sad to say, to me, not better, just new. I still have pay channels, and see the newer movies, but it's rare to find one that equals the 40's and 50's in drama and comedy. The few I've watched I have commented on, but not all, because some of them are so disappointing that I'll just seem like a real boor if I comment, as with Chicago, and Moulin Rouge (I think I made a few enemies then). I love all types of movies, and actors (both sexes). I have my favorites, and my total dislikes. Except for advertised blood and guts horror films, I will give any other movie a chance. I'll often turn one off after about 1/2 to one hour, including PPV, or rentals, but I do try. Movies and books have always been my main form of entertainment, and when they go sour, I'm unhappy. I have to say that at least 70% of todays' movies are not good, I didn't say bad, I just mean not entertaining to me. Now and then you come across a great film, but in my case, most of the time, those are the slow box office ones, like 'Frequency' or 'Crash'. In any case, I'm still looking and hoping.

 

GO BEARS !!!

 

Anne

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I can't disagree with anything you've said and thanks for the lovely compliments (see, I'm in touch with my feminine side!) I do find you knowledgeable as your postings more than indicate. It's really a pleasure to be able to speak (as it were) with others all around the country. I love almost any film dealing with WWII since my mom and dad were so heavily involved in it and it somehow on an unknown level, makes me feel more connected to them, especially now that they're both gone. I also can watch, without reservation, almost any film starring Claude Raines, Bogey, Burt Lancaster re: Elmer Gantry, Ingrid Bergman, Lauren Bacall, Katherine Hepburn and Cary Grant (especially his earlier work) Jimmy Stewart and Jean Arthur and others too numerous to mention. It truly was the "Golden Age" of Hollywood! Thanx for writing. I hope we get the chance to speak again.

 

Hollis (Fairhope, Alabama by way of Philly, PA)

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Wow, what a fountain of film knowledge you are, I'm genuinely impressed. and thank you for the info you've provided. I hope it leads to us being able to view more films that aren't currently part of the TCM library. I will in fact "suggest a movie" using the link provided. I wasn't aware it was for use other than to request a film already on file. Thanks again, and I hope 5to speak with you again.

 

Hollis

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Anne, so nice to read you lauding "Frequency"; I feel it was one of the greatest "little" films of the last 10 years! And definitely one of the strongest "good" roles of Dennis Quaid's career!

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Hollis,

 

Thanks for the compliment. I am one of the regulars around here so I hope we will be chatting often.

 

Welcome and glad to have you on board!

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In December TCM came to Seattle and taped a very special short piece about me and why I love classic film....so I will save my reasons untill after it airs.....It should start playing sometime after March......I talk about alot of the reasons why I love classic film....If my piece goes over well, other people might have a chance to have their love for TCM and all things classic taped and shown on TCM....lets cross our fingers!

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Hollis:

 

You want film knowledge? This is the place. There are lots of people here who have a undefined wealth of knowledge and if they don't know right off they sure know where to find it. Many have a genre they know particularly well. If you have questions this is the place to ask.

 

lzcutter is a film editor so she also has a vast technical knowledge as well.

 

Welcome on. Have fun.

 

Chris

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I got into old movies by watching old sci-fi, horror, Abbott & Costello and Bowery Boys' movies as a kid on NY broadcast TV in the mid-70s. Then one night when I was about 14, there was a Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers marathon on. After seeing those movies I wanted to be Astaire and be with Rogers. Starting going to the Regency Theater, the Thalia, Carnegie Hall cinema in NY and seeing old films. The Joseph Papp theatre showed all of Garbo's silent movies with a live piano player in the early 80s. Seeing those silent movies and her up there bigger than life was an experience I will never forget.

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lzcutter is a film editor so she also has a vast technical knowledge as well.>>

 

Chris,

 

I don't know that I would call it vast but it has served me well over the years. :)

 

Thank you for the compliment. Other very knowledgeable folks about the industry are Cinesage, Jr, Markfp2, JonParker, CoffeeDan and Path40a.

 

Kyle in Hollywood can tell you where to find most anything you are looking for on this website.

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To be honest with you, I don't have a story to how I became a classic film fan. I like all kinds of films, I like old films and new films and that's it. I just love movies, I have loved movies ever since I was a kid, old and new. I don't have a story to how I bacome a classic film fan, I just love movies, old and new, that's my story.

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What made me a classic movie fan, is that one day I was flipping the channels and I came across the Universal horror classics( Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolfman, etc.) and I watched all them, all the way through. And since then I've been watching all kinds of classic movies.

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Dear Izcutter,

 

I can't spend as much time at thr keyboard as I'd like due to my disability, but when I am online, this is one of my favorite places to visit. I love classic films and have the TV tuned to TCM 99% of the time. Does it sound strange that I'm less than totally concerned about the fate of the world or the current political situation, and would rather immerse myself in escapism? I don't know but TCM is the best place to do so. I've found countless films that I never knew existed and have come to appreciate many, many films that I never thought I'd watch in the proverbial million years! Believe it or not, for a long time I shied away from "Mildred Pierce" just because of the title, never realizing what a totally engrossing film it is! How foolish can a person be, and at my age? It makes me wonder if I've had a bit of undiagnosed ADD or something similar! Thanks for taking the time to reply and educating this classic film novice ( as far as what's behind the scenes and what makes these films so special!) and welcoming me to the family. Talk with you again sometime I'm sure. Bye for now...

 

Hollis

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> It can be complicated trying to keep all the studios

> and who owns what clear in one's mind. I have a

> cheat sheet that I put together on my computer

> desktop so I don't get confused.

 

I don't suppose you'd know whether Paramount still owns rights to I Walk Alone (1948) or if that was part of the films sold to MCA/Universal? :)

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There were three water-shed moments in my life, that resulted in me become a classic movie fan...

 

1. Godzilla 1985 - The first movie I can ever remember seeing. Not only did it open me up to the rest of the Japanese sci-fi and fantasy genre, I became fascinated by the same kinds of films that were being made in America, and abroad, particularly King Kong, Gorgo, and... (oh, and by the way, Godzilla introduced me to a gentleman by the name of Akira Kurosawa, as well)...

 

2. The Universal Horror movies - The first one, was Creature From The Black Lagoon, the second was Dracula and the third was Frankenstein. This broke open the flood-gates to all sorts of horror films, from Hammer's gems, to silent classics, to modern-day slasher and gore-fest, and ultimately, and perhaps, inevitably, they lead me to...

 

3. Alfred Hitchcock - The first film, being Psycho, I was REALLY hooked when I caught a few of his films (namely, Lifeboat, Strangers On A Train and The Trouble With Harry) as part of the old AMC's film preservation festival, honoring the Master of Suspense. Then, I saw the documentary, Dial H For Hitchcock, followed by Rear Window (my absolute FAVORITE movie of all-time), and I was hopelessly hooked. "Who out there was greater than Hitchcock," I thought. After that, I went on the search, and that's how I became a classic movie fan.

 

Message was edited by:

Vertigo22

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Me too! And I'm almost 54 now, probably a lot older than you, but the original Bela Lugosi, Boris Karloff, and Peter Lorre films along with others, were the ones that drew me to classic films, And in that genre, color would have destroyed the feel of the movie, Black and white seemed to be the perfect fit for their dark, foreboding nature of those movies. Check out "I Walked with a Zombie", and "White Zombie" if you haven't already seen them, I'm sure you'll like them.

 

Hollis

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Just had to reply to this thread and pay homage to my dad ~ when I was about 8 years old or so, I learned I was always in for a treat when he would say: "Want to see a good movie?" He was never wrong... And so my love of the classics has remained until this day.

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