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WATERLOO BRIDGE-BETTE DAVIS FILM


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Exactly what I said in the post I accidentally deleted: she confessed in order to preclude the possibility of doing what she was oh-so tempted to do: marry the boy and (in a sense) ruin his life. That his mother could be so gracious, loving, and still welcoming after that (knowing the danger was past; Myra "could've married him," but didn't and wouldn't) was extremely touching. Yes, she was mercenary at first (although manipulating men with sex is nothing new), but love lifted her.

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"She could have just fled and never talked to them again."

 

Then we would have no movie.

 

How about having her ask the young guy for money for sex during the first five minutes? Then the movie could end right there.

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"In Vivien's Myra, she is sympathetic from the beginning, without ever really deviating from who she was."

 

In Vivien's Myra, there was no clue that she was a prostitute. She was a very nice girl all the way through, until she read that her boyfriend was dead and then she decided that was a good reason to become a prostitute, which is downright silly.

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SPOILER WARNING, SPOILER WARNING, SPOILER WARNING, SPOILER WARNING... ONLY READ IF YOU ALREADY KNOW THE ENDING OF THIS FILM

 

They just played the original here a few days ago and I have a question about "codes". The final scene of Leigh remake had the trucks coming, etc, etc... and I am wondering, was suicide not allowed to be shown on film then? Also, did the original end the same way?

 

Thanks,

Monty

P.S. - did I warn about the spoiler enough?

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Discussions like this are why I love the boards and TCM so much. I'm sure if I mentioned "Waterloo Bridge" around the water fountain where I work I would get a lot of blank looks...Knowing what we know about James Whale from the "Gods and Monsters" movie, I wonder if the effeminate looking Douglass Montgomery was a protege of his...he seemed very made up but not unlike Maurice Chevalier or Buddy Rogers in films of the early 30's.

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*SPOILER BELOW* *SPOILER BELOW* *SPOILER BELOW* *SPOILER BELOW*

*ENDINGS DESCRIBED BELOW* *ENDINGS DESCRIBED BELOW* *ENDINGS DESCRIBED BELOW*

 

Montgomery4me,

Showing someone committing suicide by stepping in front of a truck was pretty much of a no-no under the production code, so no, we don't actually see Myra (Vivien Leigh) being run over, (thank goodness), but you know what's happening. Oddly, even though the production code boys were against suicide in general, they let it pass when it was clearly implied that the suicide was a payment for "the wages of sin". Go figure. In the '31 version, Myra gets nailed by a bomb dropped by a zeppelin on Waterloo Bridge, just after promising to marry the Douglass Montgomery character, who is going back to the front.

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Jd's Mom,

In the James Curtis bio of James Whale that I mentioned earlier in this thread, the author, who describes the film's production in great detail, doesn't even think that Whale particularly liked or respected the actor Douglass Montgomery very much, but I suppose his appearance may have contributed to his being cast in this part.

 

I thought that the story was involving enough that I forgot about his appearance except that his glossiness was a nice contrast to Mae Clarke's frayed persona and it emphasized what I figured was probably a five year age difference between the two characters, though perhaps they were meant to be the same age. Do others think that Myra was chronologically older than the boy, or did she just have alot more miles on her?

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Whew, Waterloo Bridge was fantastic! Mae Clarke was wonderful, so fresh in her opening scenes, making her later ones all the more moving. I loved her yawn and "ahhm...maybe I mentioned it." She indeed had the perfect face for the role, too, as was noted earllier in this thread. Moirafinnie, great background info on her, Whale and the production of the film--I want to go to Amazon now and buy the Curtis book.

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Shades of the Alexandre Dumas, fils' La Dames aux Camilles. The older prostitute wooed by the young male ingenue. She tries to put him off, but his enthusiasm and na?vet? are seductive. At least his parent figure (in this case, his mother) was more kind and understanding in Waterloo Bridge...

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Hi JDsmom! This has been a fascinating thread. I have not seen "Gods and Monsters" so I really don't know anything about Whale beyond the few of his movies I've seen.

 

As for blank looks, boy do I get my share when I say some guy that's been dead 40 years is my "favorite actor". Lol!

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Hi back at you.Yes, I love TCM and all the posters, even the hot topics what's your rant ones. I am 51 and knew I was different when I was 8.I made"feather" boas out of crepe paper to look like Ginger Rogers, and when my mom wouldn't let me stay up late to see a Jimmy Stewart-Carole Lombard movie, I cut the description out of the t.v. guide and framed it on my bulletin board. What some posters don't realize is how grateful we should all be to TCM. For years, before TBS Superstation started showing golden age movies in the mornings, you couldn't find them where I live...it's just nice to see them and talk with intelligent people about them

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I know what you mean. :) I can remember quarrelling with my Mother because I wanted to watch the Jimmy Stewart movie on one station and she insisted on seeing some contemporary TV show. (She won---she owned the only TV and the house around it. Hee!) If I have kids one day it might be the opposite situation. ;)

 

Miss G

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