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The Ultimate Film Noir Thread


speedracer5
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I`m not talking about that post. And sorry, but I had a very scary first date with someone recently who showed me what I was expecting to a romantic comedy and it was a porn movie.  I didn`t realize till the movie started  what was happening, but it was just another example of how a lot of men I know think women with any type of disability  (I have slight cerebral palsy in my right side) should be greatful because they are being shown any attention at all. 

 

Sorry for that experience.    Send that guy a copy of Taxi Driver!     

 

We need to continue to post more and more about noir films here until that picture of Butch Jenkins is off the main screen.

 

That was one annoying kid! 

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One comment about "Barry Lyndon" (1975), One about film noir.

 

"Barry Lyndon" (1975) was a beautiful film (by the copy Comcast recently showed, I don't know if that's still applicable or not).

 

Film noir rarely deals in all good or all bad characters; everyone's a lighter or darker shade of gray; absolutes don't exist in the film noir world.  JMO.

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Misswonderly, your story got me thinking. With FALLEN ANGEL and KISS ME DEADLY as porn titles, and the tendency to shoehorn films of all genres into Film.Noir, wouldn't it be something if there was a.body of films falling into a Porn Noir designation. It would put a new spin into Femmes Fatales and Private ****.....lol.

I just thought of another link between Porn and Film Noir. With the many variations of the parameters of what constitutes Noir, whether expansive or restrictive, I've always said Noir is like the way porn was described in the Supreme Court, "I know it when I see it!"

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I know that his film isn't a comedy, but I always find many of Fred MacMurray's lines in Double Indemnity to be funny.  I don't mean to say that the dialogue is absurd and that's why I find it funny, but rather the lines are so smooth and delivered in such a manner that I find it amusing.  I also think it's funny how he calls Barbara Stanywck "baby" all the time.  Mind you, I'm not laughing at the film as a means of mocking it, I just love Fred MacMurray's dialogue. 

 

I love Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid.  It was such a fun film and Steve Martin did a great job.

 

I also love Who Framed Roger Rabbit? Not sure if we'd classify it as a noir though. 

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Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid is my favourite Steve Martin movie.

 

I've seen all of the movies that are referenced in it which makes me enjoy it all the more.

 

I see what you mean about Double Indemnity and "Baby."

 

I'd have to re-watch Who Framed Roger Rabbit again to see if I would classify it as noir or not.  It has been a few years since I have seen it.

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What is your favorite noir setting?

 

I've always found the creepy amusement park to be an interesting locale.  Even a not-so creepy amusement park can lend to the overall vibe of the movie.

 

I absolutely love the finale scene in the fun house in Lady From Shanghai.  The mirror scene is both visually interesting and suspenseful.  

 

The creepy sideshow amusement park in Nightmare Alley definitely improved the film and gave the film an uneasiness--which was perfect for the subject matter.  

 

The roller coaster scene in A Woman on the Run was very suspenseful and my favorite scene in the entire film.  Ann Sheridan was excellent in noir and I wish she had been given more opportunities in this arena.  I really enjoyed seeing the premiere of this film last year, I wish that TCM would show it again.  Though the actor portraying Sheridan's husband in the film was dull.  I liked him better as the director of Lucy Ricardo's "Vitameatavegamin" commercial in I Love Lucy.  

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Oh, yes, the amusement park is a great locale for film noir.

 

One you haven't mentioned yet is the Hitchcock noir Strangers on a Train.  The merry go round, the tunnel of love, and the murder seen in the reflection of eyeglasses are all carnival related.

 

 

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A persons' home--where they should feel safest is proven not to be so.  Just a few movies illustrating this point:

 

"Double Indemnity" (1944)

"The Postman Always Rings Twice" (1946)

"The Killers" (1946)

"Pursued" (1947)--a western/noir

"Act of Violence" (1948)

"The Set-Up" (1949)

"Lust For Gold" (1949)--another western/noir

 

And many more.

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A persons' home--where they should feel safest is proven not to be so.  Just a few movies illustrating this point:

 

"Double Indemnity" (1944)

"The Postman Always Rings Twice" (1946)

"The Killers" (1946)

"Pursued" (1947)--a western/noir

"Act of Violence" (1948)

"The Set-Up" (1949)

"Lust For Gold" (1949)--another western/noir

 

And many more.

 

One movie where a man's castle was anything but is The Prowler.    Not to give away the plot but the male owner of the house doesn't get much screen time!

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Another great locale for film noir is the gas station/store or diner:

 

Films I enjoy that take place at important intervals at this locale include but are not limited to:

 

They Drive By Night

Out of the Past

The Petrified Forest

The Killers

The Postman Always Rings Twice

 

 

 

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Another great locale for film noir is the gas station/store or diner:

 

Films I enjoy that take place at important intervals at this locale include but are not limited to:

 

They Drive By Night

Out of the Past

The Petrified Forest

The Killers

The Postman Always Rings Twice

There are two California diner locales featured prominently in a couple of noirs from 1945: MILDREN PIERCE and FALLEN ANGEL (not to be confused with a later tv movie about child porn).

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Little off the subject, but we have the Highway Patrol DVD set and watch them fairly often.  Always interesting to see the little diners and service stations in them.  Appears they were all real.

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I know that his film isn't a comedy, but I always find many of Fred MacMurray's lines in Double Indemnity to be funny.  I don't mean to say that the dialogue is absurd and that's why I find it funny, but rather the lines are so smooth and delivered in such a manner that I find it amusing.  I also think it's funny how he calls Barbara Stanywck "baby" all the time.  Mind you, I'm not laughing at the film as a means of mocking it, I just love Fred MacMurray's dialogue. 

 

 

Me too, speedy, I think it's hilarious. Especially the way he says it, sort of crisp and fast. 

 

In fact, a lot about Double Indemnity makes me laugh. I love the movie, I think it's a great noir. And I hope I'm not of those obnoxious people who laugh when watching old movies just because they don't get it, they can't "go with" the fact that people spoke and dressed and even acted a bit differently than they do now, so they laugh. I don't do that.

But, I do think there's some stuff in DI that's kind of over-the-top. In a good way, of course. Two examples, both involving Barbara Stanwyck's character:

 

It's just hilarious when she first appears. She slinks along at the top of the stairs, first in that bathrobe get-up, and then, making her entrance in that slinky outfit with the blonde hair and the ankle bracelet. There's just something so classically "femme fatale" about this, it's funny. I only felt this way after I'd seen the film a few times.

 

Then there's that scene in the little grocery store where they meet whenever they want to make their dastardly plans. The final one, where Phyllis shows up in those dark glasses, and they're both sneaking around, murmuring to each other over the canned peas, is downright funny. If they wanted to avoid attracting attention, they picked a pretty odd way to do it. Those dark glasses, hovering over the breakfast cereal section or whatever, always makes me laugh.

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Me too, speedy, I think it's hilarious. Especially the way he says it, sort of crisp and fast. 

 

In fact, a lot about Double Indemnity makes me laugh. I love the movie, I think it's a great noir. And I hope I'm not of those obnoxious people who laugh when watching old movies just because they don't get it, they can't "go with" the fact that people spoke and dressed and even acted a bit differently than they do now, so they laugh. I don't do that.

But, I do think there's some stuff in DI that's kind of over-the-top. In a good way, of course. Two examples, both involving Barbara Stanwyck's character:

 

It's just hilarious when she first appears. She slinks along at the top of the stairs, first in that bathrobe get-up, and then, making her entrance in that slinky outfit with the blonde hair and the ankle bracelet. There's just something so classically "femme fatale" about this, it's funny. I only felt this way after I'd seen the film a few times.

 

Then there's that scene in the little grocery store where they meet whenever they want to make their dastardly plans. The final one, where Phyllis shows up in those dark glasses, and they're both sneaking around, murmuring to each other over the canned peas, is downright funny. If they wanted to avoid attracting attention, they picked a pretty odd way to do it. Those dark glasses, hovering over the breakfast cereal section or whatever, always makes me laugh.

 

Lol.  The scene in the grocery store when MacMurray and Stanwyck are trying to look inconspicuous is hilarious.  MacMurray is so tall and towers over all the shelves and Stanwyck in that cheesy wig (well I suppose it's supposed to be her real hair in the film) with the dark sunglasses is hilarious.  They are the least inconspicuous people in the store! I always laugh for some reason when that woman interrupts their scheming to ask MacMurray to grab her a box of baby food.  I can't remember if that's the first grocery store scene or the second.  Why did they pick a place with so many witnesses? Anyone would be able to remember a large, broad shouldered 6'3 man accompanied by a petite, blonde woman. 

 

The other scene that also cracks me up is the "man from Oregon" on the train.  It probably makes me laugh because I'm also from Oregon so it's funny to hear small cities like Corvallis and Klamath Falls mentioned in a big film.  I know he's from Medford, which is the biggest city in Southern Oregon, but I doubt many are familiar with that city.  I've always wondered though why the Oregonian couldn't recognize Walter Neff in Barton Keyes' office.  He may not have seen his face, but he should have been able to recognize his voice and his tall stature and build. 

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Yes, well Speedy there is a reason why the grocery scene was chosen for Martin  to appear in for Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid.

 

And of course, if you are expecting people to behave like real life in genre films like film noir......

 

Let me remind you about horror film characters hiding in the shed.

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The Street With No Name has some unintentionally funny scenes in it.

 

Widmark has a nasal problem.  Here he is a tough guy - and remember this is the man who did Tommy Udo - and everyone is afraid of him.

 

But can you really be afraid of anyone who has clogged sinuses?

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Me too, speedy, I think it's hilarious. Especially the way he says it, sort of crisp and fast.

 

In fact, a lot about Double Indemnity makes me laugh. I love the movie, I think it's a great noir. And I hope I'm not of those obnoxious people who laugh when watching old movies just because they don't get it, they can't "go with" the fact that people spoke and dressed and even acted a bit differently than they do now, so they laugh. I don't do that.

But, I do think there's some stuff in DI that's kind of over-the-top. In a good way, of course. Two examples, both involving Barbara Stanwyck's character:

 

It's just hilarious when she first appears. She slinks along at the top of the stairs, first in that bathrobe get-up, and then, making her entrance in that slinky outfit with the blonde hair and the ankle bracelet. There's just something so classically "femme fatale" about this, it's funny. I only felt this way after I'd seen the film a few times.

 

Then there's that scene in the little grocery store where they meet whenever they want to make their dastardly plans. The final one, where Phyllis shows up in those dark glasses, and they're both sneaking around, murmuring to each other over the canned peas, is downright funny. If they wanted to avoid attracting attention, they picked a pretty odd way to do it. Those dark glasses, hovering over the breakfast cereal section or whatever, always makes me laugh.

Spot on missw. You had.me chuckling here at work.as.I read this. Great film, DOUBLE INDEMNITY, excellent.writing, acting and directing.

 

Btw, have you seen the porn takeoff of DI, DOUBLE *********? Hilarious, but slightly different, although the Phyllis Dietrichson character has the same hairstyle, glasses and ankle bracelet.......and nothing else!

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The Street With No Name has some unintentionally funny scenes in it.

 

Widmark has a nasal problem. Here he is a tough guy - and remember this is the man who did Tommy Udo - and everyone is afraid of him.

 

But can you really be afraid of anyone who has clogged sinuses?

This film.also has a porn version, THE STREETWALKER WITH NO NAME. You should see the Betty Garde character!
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Has anyone seen The Burglar with Dan Dyrea and Jane Mansfield?

 

 

Does it air on TCM at all?

 

 

I had not even heard of it until it was mentioned in a trivia thread where no one could come up with the answer.

 

MOVIES-TV shows The Burglar about once or twice a month as part of their Saturday Night Noir series.    Nice 'underground' film.  I don't believe TCM has shown it.      Martha Vickers is also in the film.    She was Carmen in The Big Sleep.   I'm nuts about her.   Not so much because of her film roles (but that first scene with Bogie and her in The Big Sleep is iconic),    but because of the still photos that she took while under contract with Warner. 

 

Anyhow not a great film but worth seeing as a late entry in the noir cycle.    

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MOVIES-TV shows The Burglar about once or twice a month as part of their Saturday Night Noir series.    Nice 'underground' film.  I don't believe TCM has shown it.      Martha Vickers is also in the film.    She was Carmen in The Big Sleep.   I nuts about her.   Not so much because of her film roles (but that first scene with Bogie and her in The Big Sleep is iconic),    but because of he still photos that she took while under contract with Warner. 

 

Anyhow not a great film but worth seeing as a late entry in the noir cycle.    

 

TCM has shown The Burglar. More than once.

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