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PTM Syndrome


CaveGirl
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Post Traumatic Movie Syndrome can happen to the best of us.

 

For me, ever since I first saw at around the age of eight, the Don Siegel film "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" from the book by Jack Finney, I get spooked when I drive late at night on highways and see big paneled trucks rolling along.

 

All I can think is "Oh no, the seed pods are coming to town and the alien bodies will be planted in everyone's basement."

For me the scariest scene in movies, is when Becky Driscoll [Dana Wynter] opens up her eyes after falling asleep, and looks at Miles Bennell [Kevin McCarthy] and then you know the change has come and Santa Mira has been taken over by the pods!

 

I am writing those names off the top of my head without checking so correct them if I have misidentified them. My brain is too full now of wondering if my neighbor is currently one of the pod people or not.

 

What is your PTM Syndrome ailment?

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Love the 'original' IOTBS (1956

Had to google it to be sure, but CG you got the character names spot-on! 

Evidently your "memory lapses" are only episodic.  ;)

 

When I was a young child I used to have chronic nightmares. 

Somehow I think the movie THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS (1946) was a great contributor to that. 

I was a fan of "horror" movies at that young age but That movie scared me more than any of the others. 

I think it was because a severed hand with a criminal 'mind' was small enough to easily hide in my room undetected.

In my closet, inside my toy box, under my bed, between the mattresses, under the pillows, disguising itself as a lump in my bed covers, practically anywhere....

Then, in my dark room late at night, after I'd dozed off, it could crawl from its hiding place to my sleeping throat.... and ARRRGHhhhhhh ..... I can almost bring back the horror! 

 

I used to have this obsessive checking ritual.... I'd look at all those places and more before I lay down....but I never felt quite comfortable, as I was sure there was someplace in my room in which a 'hand' could hide that I hadn't checked, or rechecked

 

Frankenstein and the Wolf Man were too big to be undetected, and I could always 'lock' them out of my room.

Dracula could still probably find a way in if he wanted, which is why my room often reeked of garlic. But I was a night owl anyway, and kind of fancied the idea of having vampire powers, so if he did come in for a nibble, I didn't think I would mind too much.  

But a lone and devious hand.... could hide anywhere! I could never be quite sure where. 

 

It got to the point where I was afraid to go to sleep for fear of another nightmare!

 

It took a wise and sympathetic babysitter to 'cure' me of my phobia. 

When I finally mustered up the courage to share with her that I was actually afraid to go to bed, she shared with me a 'secret power' that enabled me to put those kind of nightmares behind me. 

 

For that, and other things, I will be eternally grateful to her!  -_-

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It was an Abbott and Costello film that did it to me . . . when they met Frankenstein.

 

But it wasn't Frankie that sacred me as a kid. It was Lon Chaney whenever he turned into the Wolf Man that had me freaking. Adding to that traumatizing experience as much as Chaney and his makeup was the super scarey Wolf Man theme music by Frank Skinner that played on the soundtrack.

 

The first time I saw the film I guess I was six or so - sitting on my Dad's lap and covering up my eyes with my hands (then peeking between my fingers, of course) every time I heard the Wolf Man music start to play.

 

Remember the scene in which Lou Costello is in Larry Talbot's room and swipes an orange from a bowl and stops to write a note, as the Wolf Man is creeping up behind him? I was vibrating so hard on Dad's lap that he had to stop me from falling off it!

 

Wilbur%2Band%2BWolf%2BMan.PNG

 

Gosh, I had a great time that day . . . even if I did have to change my undies afterward.

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.... it wasn't Frankie that sacred me as a kid. It was Lon Chaney whenever he turned into the Wolf Man that had me freaking. Adding to that traumatizing experience as much as Chaney and his makeup was the super scarey Wolf Man theme music by Frank Skinner that played on the soundtrack.

 

The first time I saw the film I guess I was six or so - sitting on my Dad's lap and covering up my eyes with my hands (then peeking between my fingers, of course) every time I heard the Wolf Man music start to play.

 

Remember the scene in which Lou Costello is in Larry Talbot's room and swipes an orange from a bowl and stops to write a note, as the Wolf Man is creeping up behind him? I was vibrating so hard on Dad's lap that he had to stop me from falling off it!

 

Gosh, I had a great time that day . . . even if I did have to change my undies afterward.

Yup, I do remember that. That was probably my all time favorite A&C film as a kid. Horror and comedy. Vacillating between laughter and fear and back again... What a roller coaster ride! 

 

I always felt simpatico with Larry and his angst about 'turning' when the "Autumn Moon Shines Full and Bright." 

 

I used to sometimes pretend that I was a werewolf.  

 

There was a little girl who lived up the street from me. She was a year younger than me, and used to hang around a lot.

One day I told her my secret, and explained why she couldn't follow me around.

But it back fired and she became even closer as we now shared this 'heavy' secret that nobody else knew, and she evidently really liked me and wanted to 'protect' me from myself. 

 

I finally had to 'transform' in front of her... 

 

"Oh no, Kimmy, it's happening.... Arrrghhhhh,    I   Can't   H e l p p p  M y s e l f f f..... I ' m   T  u   r   n  n   i  n  g   I n n  t o o o    a a a   .... Arrrghhhhh   R u n n,  K i m m m y y,  R  U  N N N !!!! 

R U N   H O M E   F O R   Y O U R   L I F E  ! ! !   RRRAAARRRRGHHHH!

 

I can still hear her terrified screams as  she ran away from me into the night!

I chased her down the block, snarling and howling, and watched from the streetlamp shadows as she ran up to her porch, still screaming, and quickly entered her house, slamming the door shut behind her!

 

After that, She  would still try to carefully hang out with me, but only during the day. 

Whenever I got too annoyed with her all I had to do was begin to writhe uncontrollably, and say, 

"Ohhh Nooo, K i m m y y y, . . .  It's Happening.... A G A I N N N !!!" 

 

"But it's daylight and there is no moon?" 

 

"I  K n o w w ,  B u t t t . . . . S o m e t i m e s s . . . . I t t t  H a p p e n s s . . . . T h a t t t  W a y y y ! ! !

R U N N,  K  I M M Y Y Y,  R  U  N  N  N ! ! !"   AAARRRGHHHH

 

Gosh, I wonder now if I might have caused her some sort of PTMD because of that? 

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My mom said I had nightmares after my brother took me to a matinee that showed the earlier film THEM( which was released a few years earlier, so it was some re-release) but I don't remember any nightmares.  But......

 

For ME the BIGGEST fright I got from a movie was from SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER and the horrifying thought that DISCO MUSIC might be here to STAY!  :o

 

AIEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Sepiatone

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My mom said I had nightmares after my brother took me to a matinee that showed the earlier film THEM( which was released a few years earlier, so it was some re-release) but I don't remember any nightmares.  But......

 

For ME the BIGGEST fright I got from a movie was from SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER and the horrifying thought that DISCO MUSIC might be here to STAY!  :o

 

AIEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Sepiatone

I actually enjoyed the Disco Fad, during the short time it lasted in the states... 

But then, in the 70s, I was a wild and crazy sort of guy!  B)

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Love the 'original' IOTBS (1956

Had to google it to be sure, but CG you got the character names spot-on! 

Evidently your "memory lapses" are only episodic.  ;)

 

When I was a young child I used to have chronic nightmares. 

Somehow I think the movie THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS (1946) was a great contributor to that. 

I was a fan of "horror" movies at that young age but That movie scared me more than any of the others. 

I think it was because a severed hand with a criminal 'mind' was small enough to easily hide in my room undetected.

In my closet, inside my toy box, under my bed, between the mattresses, under the pillows, disguising itself as a lump in my bed covers, practically anywhere....

Then, in my dark room late at night, after I'd dozed off, it could crawl from its hiding place to my sleeping throat.... and ARRRGHhhhhhh ..... I can almost bring back the horror! 

 

I used to have this obsessive checking ritual.... I'd look at all those places and more before I lay down....but I never felt quite comfortable, as I was sure there was someplace in my room in which a 'hand' could hide that I hadn't checked, or rechecked

 

Frankenstein and the Wolf Man were too big to be undetected, and I could always 'lock' them out of my room.

Dracula could still probably find a way in if he wanted, which is why my room often reeked of garlic. But I was a night owl anyway, and kind of fancied the idea of having vampire powers, so if he did come in for a nibble, I didn't think I would mind too much.  

But a lone and devious hand.... could hide anywhere! I could never be quite sure where. 

 

It got to the point where I was afraid to go to sleep for fear of another nightmare!

 

It took a wise and sympathetic babysitter to 'cure' me of my phobia. 

When I finally mustered up the courage to share with her that I was actually afraid to go to bed, she shared with me a 'secret power' that enabled me to put those kind of nightmares behind me. 

 

For that, and other things, I will be eternally grateful to her!  -_-

Didn't Bunuel do the thingie that crawled around in "The Beast With Five Fingers", Stephan?

 

Note, I am not referring to the other thingie that your babysitter educated you about.

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It was an Abbott and Costello film that did it to me . . . when they met Frankenstein.

 

But it wasn't Frankie that sacred me as a kid. It was Lon Chaney whenever he turned into the Wolf Man that had me freaking. Adding to that traumatizing experience as much as Chaney and his makeup was the super scarey Wolf Man theme music by Frank Skinner that played on the soundtrack.

 

The first time I saw the film I guess I was six or so - sitting on my Dad's lap and covering up my eyes with my hands (then peeking between my fingers, of course) every time I heard the Wolf Man music start to play.

 

Remember the scene in which Lou Costello is in Larry Talbot's room and swipes an orange from a bowl and stops to write a note, as the Wolf Man is creeping up behind him? I was vibrating so hard on Dad's lap that he had to stop me from falling off it!

 

Wilbur%2Band%2BWolf%2BMan.PNG

 

Gosh, I had a great time that day . . . even if I did have to change my undies afterward.

Tom, they say combining horror with comedy ups the ante on the horror. Maybe it tricks one into a lulled sense and then "POW", Larry Talbot is headed right at you with claws extended. I think the Vampire Killer movie by Polanski also combines horror with comedy as well as your choice, doncha think? I love Costello in that film by the way!

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My mom said I had nightmares after my brother took me to a matinee that showed the earlier film THEM( which was released a few years earlier, so it was some re-release) but I don't remember any nightmares.  But......

 

For ME the BIGGEST fright I got from a movie was from SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER and the horrifying thought that DISCO MUSIC might be here to STAY!  :o

 

AIEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Sepiatone

Men in white suits dancing at disco nightspots is a horrible thing to see, Sepia fer shure!

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Didn't Bunuel do the thingie that crawled around in "The Beast With Five Fingers", Stephan?

 

Note, I am not referring to the other thingie that your babysitter educated you about.

Ha Hah!

 

Regarding Luis Bunuel and TBWFF (1946), as far as I am aware the only affiliation that Bunuel had with the project was when he was approached by director Robert Florey for some ideas. Bunuel was in the states at the time, and according to his autobiography, Bunuel mentioned that he came up with the idea for the library scene where the hand was moving behind the books and Peter Lorre (as Hilary) captures it and nails it down. Both Florey and Lorre liked the idea but supposedly Warner Bros. producer William Jacobs shot it down. However a version of the Bunuel library scene was shot and used in the final cut, and Bunuel, who received neither credit nor money in recompense, contemplated a Warner Bros. lawsuit for awhile because of that. 

However, Bunuel did keep his idea and ultimately used some elements of it in another of his projects THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL (1962). 

As for the 1946 Warner Bros production, it was "based on" (but differs from) a short story by William Fryer Harvey (published as part of a compilation in 1928), the 1946 screenplay was by Curt Siodmak. Jack L. Warner was the executive producer, and the Special Effects were credited to Hans Koenkamp and William McGann. Art Direction credit was given to Stanley Fleisher. As usual for those days there were many involved who received no credit at all for their efforts. In TBWFF this would include (in Art and Visual Effects) Bertram TuttleRussell Collings, Paul Detlefsen, and Mario Larrinaga

 

The primary cast included: Victor Francen (as the original owner of 'the hand'), Andrea King (his nurse), Peter Lorre (as a disturbed musicologist), Robert Alda (an out-of-work composer), Charles Dingle (as a money grubbing relative), and the great J. Carrol Naish (as an Italian Police Inspector).  The eerie music was composed by the wonderful Max Steiner

 

Reportedly this project was disdained by most of the 'creative' parties tasked to make it. But Warner Bros. had purchased the film rights in 1942, and executives were determined to get something back from their investment. 

 

I remember as a child, being on a roller coaster ride with this one. The B&W settings were pretty gothic. Bach's piano music rendered moody & eerie. There were elements that left me wondering if the hand was real, or just a figment of Hilary's imagination. As a kid I felt relieved when the police inspector revealed the the latter, however the film concluded leaving me the impression that it was the former. And that is the impression that stuck with me, and contributed to my sleep phobia.  

There is a time when most children reach a point where they are able to tell the difference between what is real and what is not. Evidently when I first saw TBWFF I wasn't there yet. 

Anyway, to this day it remains near the top of my 'spookiest' movies list. (No doubt due to that indelible childhood impression).

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