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Your Favourite Performances from 1929 to present are...


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I must have been a weird kid.  I saw both of Hitchcock's gorier films: Psycho and The Birds probably at the end of elementary school or the beginning of middle school and I loved them.  My favorite part of Psycho was when Norman Bates' mom's skeleton turns around after Vera Miles taps her on the shoulder.  My favorite part of The Birds was when they find the man with his eyes pecked out.  My second favorite part was when the bird attacks the little girl as they foolishly leave the school and run outside (why did they leave the school? It never made sense to me).  

 

 

Don't feel too weird there, speed. I saw Psycho and The Birds early as well. They were the first Hitch films I saw, and the foundation for why I like his work.

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Don't feel too weird there, speed. I saw Psycho and The Birds early as well. They were the first Hitch films I saw, and the foundation for why I like his work.

I don't want to deviate from 1936 too much, but I will say that I prefer Hitch's films from the 1940s-1950s, the ones that feature all the glamorous Hollywood stars (if you will).  From Psycho and onward, his films took on a decidedly more violent and horror approach.  They deviated from the glamorous suspense films from the Golden Era.  I suppose this is indicative of Hitch trying to keep up with the times, but I like his more subtle approach when it came to his storytelling and suspense tactics.  

 

Though I do love Psycho but mostly for the music and Anthony Perkins.  How chilling is the last scene when his "mother" says: "Why, she wouldn't even hurt a fly" and that skull face is superimposed over Norman's for a split second?

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SPEEDY:

 

Not a weird kid.  No, I did not tend to watch movies when I was a teenager because until I was 18 there was only one movie theatre, people I knew from school went there/worked there, and after seeing them all day, I was not interested in seeing them in the evening.  I liked to be alone in the evenings.

 

I was also way too busy being a full time student, choir member of several choirs, member of the yearbook committee, volunteering, etc. (man, did I have a busy life when I was in the academic world)

 

Therefore, I did not see many movies made from 1985 until after I graduated from university in 1999.

 

As for Rear Window being my first Hitchcock movie :

 

Raymond Burr died when I was in grade 12.  I knew that he hated his movie career and only felt proud of one big screen movie of his career: Rear Window.

 

Eventually, I decided that I could not consider myself a true Raymond Burr fan and not see this movie.  I loved it and started watching Hitchcock movies all that I could find.  And that movie remains the only Hitchcock movie I've seen on the big screen.  I went into Vancouver to see it.

 

I love The Birds and Psycho now.  But it never occurred to me that Hitchcock would direct a movie like Dial M For Murder or even the comedy Mr. and Mrs. Smith.

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SPEEDY:

 

Not a weird kid.  No, I did not tend to watch movies when I was a teenager because until I was 18 there was only one movie theatre, people I knew from school went there/worked there, and after seeing them all day, I was not interested in seeing them in the evening.  I liked to be alone in the evenings.

 

I was also way too busy being a full time student, choir member of several choirs, member of the yearbook committee, volunteering, etc. (man, did I have a busy life when I was in the academic world)

 

Therefore, I did not see many movies made from 1985 until after I graduated from university in 1999.

 

As for Rear Window being my first Hitchcock movie :

 

Raymond Burr died when I was in grade 12.  I knew that he hated his movie career and only felt proud of one big screen movie of his career: Rear Window.

 

Eventually, I decided that I could not consider myself a true Raymond Burr fan and not see this movie.  I loved it and started watching Hitchcock movies all that I could find.  And that movie remains the only Hitchcock movie I've seen on the big screen.  I went into Vancouver to see it.

 

I love The Birds and Psycho now.  But it never occurred to me that Hitchcock would direct a movie like Dial M For Murder or even the comedy Mr. and Mrs. Smith.

 

I saw Rear Window in the theater last year when it was in theaters two days only last year as part of TCM and Fathom's Classic film events.  It was a great film to see on the big screen.  I've also seen Psycho, North By Northwest, Dial M for Murder and The Birds on the big screen.  The Birds and Psycho are very fun to see on the big screen.

 

I'd love to see Vertigo on the big screen.  When I first saw the film, I didn't think it made any sense, but it was interesting.  Now, each time I've seen the film, I've gotten more and more out of each successive viewing.  I always notice something new when I see the film.  A few years ago, my husband and I stayed a night at the Hotel Vertigo in San Francisco.  This building used to be the Empire Hotel which was used as Kim Novak's apartment in the film.  I even got to stand at the top of the famous square stairwell that inspired Hitchcock to have the same style stairwell built for the famous church scenes.

 

I've seen most of Hitchcock's films except for his early British films and the films made at the end of his career.  What I love is how each of his films are so different from one another.  They use similar plot devices, like the macguffin, but the film itself is a completely different theme, different conflict, etc.

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Lucky you, Speedy.

 

I could go into Bellingham and see those TCM movies on the big screen- meaning that they do play there. I used to go to Bellingham all the time growing up.  Now I have no way to get there unless I was on some sort of bus trip with a group of people as I have no car (not that I ever drove anyway) and never do any international travelling.

 

I`ve had people tell me I should keep up my American passport as it would be easier to go across the border- I was born in the US because my father was American -but it is not high on my to-do list.

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Lucky you, Speedy.

 

I could go into Bellingham and see those TCM movies on the big screen- meaning that they do play there. I used to go to Bellingham all the time growing up.  Now I have no way to get there unless I was on some sort of bus trip with a group of people as I have no car (not that I ever drove anyway) and never do any international travelling.

 

I`ve had people tell me I should keep up my American passport as it would be easier to go across the border- I was born in the US because my father was American -but it is not high on my to-do list.

Ah.  I hope that these TCM/Fathom events expand to Canada some day.  I'm sure there are many people who would be interested in these events. 

 

I don't have a passport at all.  I've been to Canada twice (Vancouver and Victoria), but when I went, a passport wasn't required to travel between the US and Canada.  

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Ah.  I hope that these TCM/Fathom events expand to Canada some day.  I'm sure there are many people who would be interested in these events. 

 

I don't have a passport at all.  I've been to Canada twice (Vancouver and Victoria), but when I went, a passport wasn't required to travel between the US and Canada.  

I am waiting for the day, because there are plenty of bus groups that go into Vancouver for things. Not so much as before we got a new Cultural Centre here and big stars and shows come here.  Mickey Rooney opened the Centre.  Too expensive the tickets were for me.

 

As for international travelling, I have not been on a plane since 2000 when I went to Europe.  I have friends that travel all the time.  But I have never attempted to do this since the twin towers.

 

 

The fact that I did not see Roman Holiday on the big screen really annoyed me,.

 

 

Oh, well.

 

Of the 1936 movies mentioned, the one I would love to see on the big screen the most is Libelled Lady.  It would be a scream. 

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I am waiting for the day, because there are plenty of bus groups that go into Vancouver for things. Not so much as before we got a new Cultural Centre here and big stars and shows come here.  Mickey Rooney opened the Centre.  Too expensive the tickets were for me.

 

As for international travelling, I have not been on a plane since 2000 when I went to Europe.  I have friends that travel all the time.  But I have never attempted to do this since the twin towers.

 

 

The fact that I did not see Roman Holiday on the big screen really annoyed me,.

 

 

Oh, well.

 

Of the 1936 movies mentioned, the one I would love to see on the big screen the most is Libelled Lady.  It would be a scream. 

 

I was going to see Roman Holiday, but because I'm lame, I completely forgot.  I could have gone and intended to go.  The day comes and I go to work, get off work (well before the 7pm start time), went to the store, bought dinner, got home, made dinner, I sit down to eat at about 8pm and all of a sudden remembered: "Crap! I was going to go see Roman Holiday." I compensated by watching my DVD of Roman Holiday instead.  Not the same, but I did watch it.  This year I already saw my first choice, The Maltese Falcon.  The other two TCM/Fathom selections I wanted to see, Breakfast at Tiffany's and From Here to Eternity, are showing in the theater in November and December, respectively, so I have time to wait.

 

Of the 1936 films we discussed...

 

I agree that Libeled Lady would be fun to see in the theater.  I'd also love to watch The Charge of the Light Brigade on the big screen.  Despite the horrific treatment of the horses, the scale of the battle scene would be fun to see on the big screen.  Though I still cannot fathom choosing the bland and so-so Patric Knowles over the charismatic and charming Errol Flynn.

 

When I first saw My Man Godfrey, I didn't like it.  I loved William Powell, but I found Carole Lombard so incredibly annoying.  Well, as I've seen more Lombard films and understood her shtick and have re-watched 'Godfrey,' I've found that she's grown on me.  I actually find her manic personality to be funny and charming rather than irritating.

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With My Man Godfrey, Libelled Lady, After the Thin Man, and The Great Ziegfeld, I have no hesitation in saying that the Actor of the Year for 1936 is:

 

William Powell

 

You beat me to it, kingrat. I was going to make the same proclamation later this week.

 

In fact, considering the quantity and quality of Powell's output this year, there's no doubt in my mind that 1936 represents the very peak of his career.

 

The irony of this, however, is that tragedy awaited William Powell in his personal life the following year, with the completely unexpected death of girlfriend Jean Harlow.

 

I would like to add, though, that, with the releases of Desire, Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, The General Died at Dawn and The Plainsman, Gary Cooper also had a spectacular year, as well. The problem is, though, that with three of those four films Paramount productions that never come on TCM, posters here are simply not as familiar with Cooper's 1936 output as they are with Powell's.

 

Cooper, like Powell, had an Oscar nomination this year, as well. Powell's Great Ziegfeld won Best Picture while Cooper's Mr. Deeds got Best Direction for Frank Capra. Both actors enjoyed tremendous career status this year.

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Here are my choices of the 79 films I've seen from 1936 for…

 

Best Actor of 1936

 

1.  CHARLES CHAPLIN ("a factory worker"), Modern Times

2.  PAUL MUNI (Louis Pasteur), The Story of Louis Pasteur

3.  WILLIAM POWELL (Godfrey Parke/”Godfrey Smith”/”Duke”), My Man Godfrey

4.  HARRY BAUR (Emperor Rudolph II of Prague), The Golem

5.  WALTER HUSTON (Samuel Dodsworth), Dodsworth

 

6.  CHARLES LAUGHTON (Rembrandt van Rijn), Rembrandt

7.  GARY COOPER (Longfellow Deeds), Mr. Deeds Goes to Town

8.  LESLIE HOWARD (Romeo), Romeo and Juliet

9.  WILLIAM POWELL (Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr.), The Great Ziegfeld

10. ROLAND YOUNG (George McWhirter Fotheringay), The Man Who Could Work Miracles

 

and...

 

WILLIAM POWELL (William "Bill" Stevens Chandler),  Libeled Lady

STAN LAUREL (“Himself”/Alfie Laurel) and OLIVER HARDY (“Himself”/Bert Hardy), Our Relations

WARNER BAXTER (Dr. Samuel Alexander Mudd), The Prisoner of Shark Island

SPENCER TRACY (Warren Haggerty), Libeled Lady

WILLIAM POWELL (Nick Charles), After the Thin Man

C. AUBREY SMITH (John Arthur Mollinucks Errol, Earl of Dorincourt), Little Lord Fauntleroy

OSCAR HOMOLKA (Karl Anton Verloc), Sabotage

WILLIAM POWELL (Dr. Lawrence Bradford), The Ex-Mrs. Bradford

GARY COOPER (Wild Bill Hickok), The Plainsman

JOEL MCCREA (Dr. Joseph Cardin), These Three

LESLIE HOWARD (Alan Squier), The Petrified Forest

GARY COOPER (Tom Bradley), Desire

JEAN GABIN (Wasska Pepel), The Lower Depths

LIONEL BARRYMORE (Paul Lavond/Madame Mandolip), The Devil-Doll

ROBERT TAYLOR (Armand Duvall), Camille

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For those interested, here are the top ten box office stars of 1936, according to Martin Quigley's annual poll of motion picture exhibitors:

 

1. Shirley Temple

2. Clark Gable

3. Astaire and Rogers

4. Robert Taylor

5. Joe E. Brown

6. Dick Powell

7. Joan Crawford

8. Claudette Colbert

9. Jeanette MacDonald

10. Gary Cooper

 

Interesting how so few of those names got on any of our lists for best performances of the year.

 

According to Arturo the films appraised each year for box office were not those released January through December of any year. They were, approximately, those released from August or September of the previous year to 12 months later. So part of this list is really a reflection of later 1935 box office results, as well. At least, that is my understanding of it.

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Speedracer5--You're not weird.  Hitchcock's two goriest films were among the first ones I saw ("1966's "Torn Curtain" and 1972"s "Frenzy") as well as his lighter ones (i sneaked in to see 1976's "Family Plot"--Hitchcock's last  and a witty and lightweight film to end to his career).  I got a fairly thorough education on Hitchcock and film in general thanks to "The CBS Late Movie" (anyone else remember that?).  I saw all his 40's films (excepting "Rope" & Under Capricorn") multiple times, as well as other films, ("Dial M for Murder" & "The Birds" the most often).  Back to 1936.

 

Bogie56--Tell us about 1936's "The Golem please.  The only film I recollect by that name is a 1960's Hammer horror movie with Barbara Steele, and no Emperor featured in the plot (I Think).  Is this a horror or historical film I've missed??

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Speedracer5--You're not weird.  Hitchcock's two goriest films were among the first ones I saw ("1966's "Torn Curtain" and 1972"s "Frenzy") as well as his lighter ones (i sneaked in to see 1976's "Family Plot"--Hitchcock's last  and a witty and lightweight film to end to his career).  I got a fairly thorough education on Hitchcock and film in general thanks to "The CBS Late Movie" (anyone else remember that?).  I saw all his 40's films (excepting "Rope" & Under Capricorn") multiple times, as well as other films, ("Dial M for Murder" & "The Birds" the most often).  Back to 1936.

 

Bogie56--Tell us about 1936's "The Golem please.  The only film I recollect by that name is a 1960's Hammer horror movie with Barbara Steele, and no Emperor featured in the plot (I Think).  Is this a horror or historical film I've missed??

 

The Golem (1936) is a French film by Julien Duvivier that I caught on tv here in Toronto a while ago.  Not a great print.  It follows the same story as that of the more famous 1920 German silent, Paul Wegener version.

It is a folk story with a supernatural bent.  The Golem is created to protect the Jews who are being persecuted by the Emperor.  Baur plays a very effective baddy in this one.

I wish TCM would dig out some Harry Baur films and devote a day or evening to him.  You should read his biography on the imdb or wikipedia.  He was known as the French Emil Jannings and it is likely he was killed by the Gestapo during the war.

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My all-time favourite Laurel and Hardy feature, Our Relations (1936) will be on TCM in the States on Saturday morning, April 2.  They appear as a set of mis-matched twins.  Now there's a mini series of films for TCM.  They could follow this with Start the Revolution Without Me (1970).

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By the way, I saw Chaplin's Modern Times (1936) for the very first time in the theatre.  In the fall of 1972 Chaplin's films were restored and enjoying a theatrical run.  I also saw The Gold Rush, City Lights and The Great Dictator and a few others.

I had been going to see films like The French Connection, The Godfather and A Clockwork Orange so I expected to see something very antiquated.  Not so.  Those lucky enough to be in the theatre were roaring with laughter.  It was almost like watching a magic act.  Modern Times was so good it seemed very unreal.

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For those interested, here are the top ten box office stars of 1936, according to Martin Quigley's annual poll of motion picture exhibitors:

 

1. Shirley Temple

2. Clark Gable

3. Astaire and Rogers

4. Robert Taylor

5. Joe E. Brown

6. Dick Powell

7. Joan Crawford

8. Claudette Colbert

9. Jeanette MacDonald

10. Gary Cooper

 

Interesting how so few of those names got on any of our lists for best performances of the year.

 

According to Arturo the films appraised each year for box office were not those released January through December of any year. They were, approximately, those released from August or September of the previous year to 12 months later. So part of this list is really a reflection of later 1935 box office results, as well. At least, that is my understanding of it.

 

 

This will likely be partly due to access as you said.  Shirley Temple is a Fox studio star.  Cooper I see on Silver Screen Classics.

 

And then, again, not everyone has seen enough movie recently from this year of movies to be able to do longer list of nominees like I do and Bogie do.

 

Of curse I still have one category to go, but yeah, if TCM does not show them, most voters won't know them

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I guess the reason that I saw most of the Garbo, Bogart, Marx Bros., Chaplin and other classics at the cinema for the first time was because back in the 1970's there were no vhs recordings so the Revue houses in a big city were still quite popular.

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And then, again, not everyone has seen enough movie recently from this year of movies to be able to do longer list of nominees like I do and Bogie do.

 

I've seen 72 films from 1936. I have just been limiting myself to 5 nominees to keep the Oscar format, and to keep things from getting too bloated. I may expand after we get to the 40's. Or not.

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I've seen 72 films from 1936. I have just been limiting myself to 5 nominees to keep the Oscar format, and to keep things from getting too bloated. I may expand after we get to the 40's. Or not.

 

 

I cannot limited myself to 5.  I would try, but Bogie said we didn't have to and since Bogie started the thread, I am relieving myself of the stress.

 

Now, when it gets to later years that won't happen.

 

Of course,  always have less nominees from Best Supporting actress  than others.

 

But, yes I know you and Bogie have seen a lot of movies from all decades. But many of the people who have just joined this thread have not.

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I've seen 72 films from 1936. I have just been limiting myself to 5 nominees to keep the Oscar format, and to keep things from getting too bloated. I may expand after we get to the 40's. Or not.

 

In terms of a contest and trying to create the hype that will surround it I can see why they limit the acting nominees to 5.  But hey, I started keeping longer lists as sometimes I would see a film again and say, "what the heck was I thinking, this isn't very good at all" and then my list would be one-short.  "With the help of a computer", as Dr. Strangelove would say it is quite easy to keep adding and adding and adding to lists of favourites.  You can also search the list by actor instead of by year and get your 12 favourite Spencer Tracy's for instance.   :)

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Forget I said anything. I don't just have **** taste, I'm an idiot as well. :mellow:

 

 

This is a satirical statement, yes?

 

By the way, Speedy and I kind of led the thread astray with our conversation which we both loved, but well, I won't apologize for this as Lorna pointed out, John Wayne said that this is a sign of weakness.  Being Canadian it is inborn, though.

 

So I will say:

 

I'm not sorry we had fun, but  I tried to lead it back to 1936.

 

Let's not have anyone referring to themselves as an idiot except in cases of needing our teenager neighbours knowing how to fix tech problems.  I am a big imbecile then.

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Here the titles I have not seen from 1936:

 

Banjo On My Knee

Beloved Enemy

Crack-Up

Craig's Wife

The Dancing Pirate

Desire

The Ex-Mrs. Bradford

Follow the Fleet

The Garden of Allah

The Ghost Goes West

The Golden Arrow

The Golem

Green Pastures

Intermezzo

It Couldn't Have Happened, but It Did

Klondike Annie

Little Lord Fauntleroy

Love Before Breakfast

The Man Who Could Work Miracles

Men Are Not Gods

Our Relations

Pennies From Heaven

The Plainsman

Poor Little Rich Girl

The Princess Comes Across

The Prisoner of Shark Island

Road to Glory

The Trail of the Lonesome Pine

The Unguarded Hour

A Woman Rebels

 

 

Here are titles I have not seen, but have taped to watch:

 

Lloyd's of London

Rembrandt

Rose Marie

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