Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Your Favourite Performances from 1929 to present are...


Recommended Posts

Lawrence, if I had to pick just one film from your unseen list that I have seen to recommend I might pick Marcel Pagnol's The Baker's Wife.  It is a charming little film.  Nothing earth shattering mind you.  It's story involves a village baker who's wife has just left him.  His work suffers because of his depression and his customers who long for the good old days of finely baked bread conspire to reunite the couple.  Pagnol is really ripe for rediscovery.  I'm trying to track down several of his other films, Harvest (1937) being one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lawrence, if I had to pick just one film from your unseen list that I have seen to recommend I might pick Marcel Pagnol's The Baker's Wife.  It is a charming little film.  Nothing earth shattering mind you.  It's story involves a village baker who's wife has just left him.  His work suffers because of his depression and his customers who long for the good old days of finely baked bread conspire to reunite the couple.  Pagnol is really ripe for rediscovery.  I'm trying to track down several of his other films, Harvest (1937) being one.

 

The Baker's Wife has been on my to-see list for awhile, as it's one of the 1001 Movies to See... Pagnol is also responsible for the Fanny trilogy, which I love, so there's another reason.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

1938 to-see list:

 

They Drive By Night

The Sisters

Mollanard

The Baker's Challenge

The Beachcomber

The Challenge

Trade Winds

Topper Takes a Trip

Blondie

Joy of living

Port of Shadows

The Shining Hour

The Affairs of Anabel

 

 

and others.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

PORT OF SHADOWS will be on TCM later this month.

 

THE BAKER'S WIFE is definitely on my list of must-see films.

 

About some of the other less familiar titles: SUEZ has little relationship to the actual building of the Suez Canal, but it's a fun film if you like Tyrone Power and Loretta's big dress, and Annabella is quite charming. If you like Errol Flynn or Bette Davis, THE SISTERS is very enjoyable, too.

 

TRADE WINDS has a story written around home movies Tay Garnett took of his trip to the South Pacific. Joan Bennett as a murder suspect on the lam, Fredric March as the detective chasing her, Ann Sothern and Ralph Bellamy providing plenty of comedy.

 

THE SHINING HOUR is a "domestic melodrama," aka a woman's picture, directed by Frank Borzage. Joan Crawford is a nightclub dancer who jumps at the chance to marry a nice Midwesterner (Melvyn Douglas) and quit the theatrical profession. Joan's new brother-in-law (Robert Young) falls for her, even though he's married to Margaret Sullavan. As for Joan's new sister-in-law, well, Fay Bainter simply loathes Joan. Joan Crawford insisted that Margaret Sullavan be cast, even though she knew that Sullavan might steal the film. If you like the genre and the stars, it's well done.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are the films from 1938 that were mentioned that I have not seen as yet. 

 

The Affairs of Annabel with Lucille Ball

Blondie with Penny Singleton

Carefree with Luella Gear

The Crowd Roars with Frank Morgan

Four’s a Crowd with Errol Flynn and Rosalind Russell

Give Me a Sailor with Martha Raye

Nancy Drew, Detective with Bonita Granville

King of Alcatraz with J. Carroll Naish

Little Miss Broadway with Edna May Oliver

The Mad Miss Manton with Hattie McDaniel

Merrily We Live with Brian Aherne, Billie Burke, Clarence Kolb and Patsy Kelly

My Lucky Star with Cesar Romero

Paradise For Three with Frank Morgan, Mary Astor and Edna May Oliver

The Shopworn Angel with Margaret Sullavan

St. Martin’s Lane/Sidewalks of London with Charles Laughton and Vivien Leigh

Suez with Annabella

They Drive by Night with Ernest Thesiger

Topper Takes a Trip with Roland Young and Billie Burke

White Banners with Fay Bainter

 

And I would like to see these again …

 

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer for May Robson

Marie Antoinette for Gladys George

A Slight Case of Murder for Ruth Donnelly

Too Hot to Handle for Walter Connolly

Trade Winds for Ralph Bellamy and Ann Sothern

 

I should probably give Holiday another go as well.  I've seen it twice and it didn't do much for me.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

And I would like to see these again …

 

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer for May Robson

 

I picked May Robson as best supporting actress of the year for this film, but I noticed that her performance here got a reaction from noone else. Are there no other Aunt Polly fans here? Robson is perfection in the role!

 

s-l1000.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I picked May Robson as best supporting actress of the year for this film, but I noticed that her performance here got a reaction from noone else. Are there no other Aunt Polly fans here? Robson is perfection in the role!

 

I haven't seen it, and as you can see by my lack of extensive juvenile winners or even nominees, I seldom choose to watch films centered around kids. There are some good ones, though, and this may be one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't seen it, and as you can see by my lack of extensive juvenile winners or even nominees, I seldom choose to watch films centered around kids. There are some good ones, though, and this may be one.

 

I understand your reluctance, Lawrence, because I feel the same way. But I saw Adventures of Tom Sawyer on TV a lot as a kid and have some feelings of nostalgia about it. I do remember being scared as a kid by Victor Jory as Injun Joe. But I also found Tommy Kelly an engaging Tom and Ann Gillis (still with us today) a charming Becky Thatcher. Best of all, though, I like the combination of grumpiness, warmth and sentiment that May Robson brought to Aunt Polly.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have not seen any of the following 1938 films mentioned on this thread:

 

Going Places

Blondie

Affairs of Annabel

Mollenard

Young Dr, Kildaire

Woman's Face

Port of Shadows

Shining Hour

Paradise for Three

Too Much Johnson

King of Alcatraz

 

The following are but vague memories:

 

Of Human Hearts

Merrily We Live

Goldwyn Follies

Nancy Drew Detective

La Bete Humaine

Shopworn Angel

Mad Miss Manton

Divorce of Lady X

Give Me A Sailor

Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm

Love Finds Andy Hardy (excessively wholesome films might remain a vague memory for me)

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have not seen any of the following 1938 films mentioned on this thread:

 

Young Dr, Kildaire

 

 

 

Well, Tom of those on your to-see list I would recommend Young Dr. Kildare for the sole reason that it is on TCM, Monday, April 11 at 11:30 p.m. as part of their 'the best of the Barrymores.'  It's an early Dr. Kildare that isn't exceptional by any means.  But I thought Jo Ann Sayers was quite good in the small part as 'Barbara Chanler.'  I'm recording the two that follow that I have not seen.  Sometimes there are some good little bits in these Hospital soapers.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Port of Shadows is airing later this month?  When?  I would look it up on the schedule, but I am not a big fan of the new look.

PORT OF SHADOWS (QUAI DES BRUMES) will be on the evening of April 17.

 

I haven't seen it, and as you can see by my lack of extensive juvenile winners or even nominees, I seldom choose to watch films centered around kids. There are some good ones, though, and this may be one.

Lawrence, we are alike on this subject. Brigitte Fossey in FORBIDDEN GAMES (1952) is an amazing exception.

 

Since several of you have indicated that you don't know PARADISE FOR THREE: A poor guy (Robert Young) enters a slogan contest and wins. The rich owner (Frank Morgan) enters under an assumed name and also wins. The prize is a vacation at a ski resort. Edna May Oliver calls ahead to tip off the resort that one of the winners is the boss man. Wait, you've all seen comedies before: you know they're going to get it wrong about who's rich and who's poor. Mary Astor is a gold digger after a rich husband; Florence Rice is the rich guy's daughter (three guesses who she falls for). Edna May Oliver shows up to try to set everything right and of course she gets on a pair of skis and . . . . Nothing new or surprising, but capably done. The weird thing is that this is based on a German novel, and the movie's high jinks take place in Austria. In 1938.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Choices for 1938

 

Actor

 

Jean Gabin, Grand Illusion

Errol Flynn, The Adventures of Robin Hood

James Cagney, Angels with Dirty Faces

Cary Grant, Bringing up Baby

Nikolai Chersakov, Alexander Nevsky

 

Actress

 

Katherine Hepburn, Bringing up Baby

Margaret Sullavan, Three Comrades

Katherine Hepburn, Holiday

Wendy Hiller, Pygmalion

Michele Morgan, Port of Shadows

 

Supporting Actor

 

Marcel Dalio,  Grand Illusion

 

Supporting Actress

 

Olivia De Havailand, The Adventures of Robin Hood

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

For those who care, there is a decent looking version of Adventures of Tom Sawyer on You Tube. There are some subtitles on the bottom of the screen (Russian?), but you can still enjoy the film anyway.

 

This is a quite charming version of Mark Twain's novel, in my opinion, with, among other virtues, one of my supporting favourites of 1938, May Robson as Aunt Polly (watch her timing in the film's final scene, and see if she doesn't make you laugh out loud).

Link to post
Share on other sites

For those who care, care there is a decent looking version of Adventures of Tom Sawyer on You Tube. There are some subtitles on the bottom of the screen (Russian?), but you can still enjoy the film anyway.

 

This is a quite charming version of Mark Twain's novel, in my opinion, with, among other virtues, one of my supporting favourites of 1938, May Robson as Aunt Polly (watch her timing in the film's final scene, and see if she doesn't make you laugh out loud).

I have seen this film before and enjoy it.  I have seen a lot of films based upon Mark Twain regardless of the era.  I just did not include anyone in my lists.  I  have pared down my list of films of 1939 seen recently enough films to 46.  I've seen more than that, but this is more manageable in what for me, despite 1940s being my favourite decade, is my favourite movie year of all.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For those who care, there is a decent looking version of Adventures of Tom Sawyer on You Tube. There are some subtitles on the bottom of the screen (Russian?), but you can still enjoy the film anyway.

 

This is a quite charming version of Mark Twain's novel, in my opinion, with, among other virtues, one of my supporting favourites of 1938, May Robson as Aunt Polly (watch her timing in the film's final scene, and see if she doesn't make you laugh out loud).

 

It's a very sweet film. Btw, the Bronx-born Tommy Kelly, who played Tom Sawyer, died in January 2016 aged 90.

 

c7889ce39eb5c537dc0860fa174b786d.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have wanted to see George Cukor's A Woman's Face for number of decades. So I'm always trying not to listen too much to the plot.

 

Silly me, I just found out a couple of years ago that Ingrid Bergman did this movie originally in Sweden. So now I've got two reasons not to want to spoil the plot.

 

When I lived in France they used to show her Swedish movies on the late show.

That's when I saw the original Intermezzo.

 

It's hard to believe that she was more beautiful before the Hollywood Glamour treatment, but she was.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have wanted to see George Cukor's A Woman's Face for number of decades. So I'm always trying not to listen too much to the plot.

 

Silly me, I just found out a couple of years ago that Ingrid Bergman did this movie originally in Sweden. So now I've got two reasons not to want to spoil the plot.

 

When I lived in France they used to show her Swedish movies on the late show.

That's when I saw the original Intermezzo.

 

It's hard to believe that she was more beautiful before the Hollywood Glamour treatment, but she was.

 

I try not to read too much about plots to Errol Flynn films I haven't seen.  I haven't seen all of them yet, and if I am not too careful, I'll read the entire plot of all of the ones I am missing before I see them.  Sure, some of them I have seen other versions.  But others are not.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not going to make any special recommendations of the real films I listed. None of them inspire me much; except the Ralph Richardson ones, I suppose. Instead I'll give another shout out to Too Much Johnson, the first Orson Welles project that was never finished or released.

 

It's important to point out a couple of flaws. The first is that film needs some serious editing down. Many scenes were re-shot so many times it becomes a bit tiresome to watch them. How many times do we need to see Jo Cotten looking around and walking through boxes? Many of these repetitions could be easily taken out, but this is not the major flaw, anyway.

 

The major flaw is the horrid new soundtrack that the film has been given. Whoever composed it didn't seem to realize that this was a comedy, but that aside I really can't imagine any sort of film that that music would be welcome in. It was the pits. I did what I always do in such situations: replaced it. Instead I listened to a record of barrel organ music that worked so well I'd almost consider syncing it to the film if I had the resources and know-how. The point is: try to find something more upbeat.

 

Get over these two hurdles and the film is most enjoyable. Joseph Cotten surprised me with how athletic he was in handling these silent-film fashioned leaps across building tops and such. I always knew Orson Welles was a big Buster Keaton fan, it's really made clear by this film which just radiates fun-had-by-all.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have wanted to see George Cukor's A Woman's Face for number of decades. So I'm always trying not to listen too much to the plot.

 

Silly me, I just found out a couple of years ago that Ingrid Bergman did this movie originally in Sweden. So now I've got two reasons not to want to spoil the plot.

 

When I lived in France they used to show her Swedish movies on the late show.

That's when I saw the original Intermezzo.

 

It's hard to believe that she was more beautiful before the Hollywood Glamour treatment, but she was.

 

I watched both of the versions of A Woman's Face last week.   Bergman is very good in the original and made my performance list.  I've seen her in 3 pre-Hollywood Swedish films and this was her best.  The story and plot and production values are better executed in the remake but some of the acting from the lesser characters is just too corny.  All in all I preferred the original probably because it wasn't as ambitious and therefor succeeded better at what it was trying to achieve.  A bit more modest.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Bogie56 changed the title to Your Favourite Performances from 1929 to present are...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...