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Tom, just hazarding a guess but I would say that was Basil himself singing that song.  There seem to be a couple of very small moments where there is a stronger hint of his natural voice.  Good performance.

 

Beautiful little scene, isn't it? It was Rathbone's personal favourite of all his films in which Sherlock Holmes went into disguise.

 

I don't recognize Basil's voice at all in that singing, the reason I posed the question. I'm not saying it isn't his singing, I'm just uncertain. Nice to see, though, that you think Baz did it.

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Beautiful little scene, isn't it? It was Rathbone's personal favourite of all his films in which Sherlock Holmes went into disguise.

 

I don't recognize Basil's voice at all in that singing, the reason I posed the question. I'm not saying it isn't his singing, I'm just uncertain. Nice to see, though, that you think Baz did it.

He appeared in a few other musical performances throughout his career, including a couple of singing Scrooges in the 1950s. He had a great ability to disguise his voice (and appearance). In the Holmes films, he often does that.

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Here are my choices of the 83 films I've seen from 1939 for…

 

Best Supporting Actress of 1939

 

1.  HATTIE MCDANIEL (Mammy), Gone With the Wind

2.  MARGARET HAMILTON (Miss Elvira Gulch/"the Wicked Witch of the West"), The Wizard of Oz

3.  GREER GARSON (Katherine Mary Ellis Chipping), Goodbye, Mr. Chips

4.  BETTY FIELD (Mae, "Curly's Wife"), Of Mice and Men

5.  GERALDINE FITZGERALD (Isabella Linton), Wuthering Heights

 

6.  BUTTERFLY MCQUEEN (Prissy), Gone With the Wind

7.  FLORA ROBSON (Ellen Dean), Wuthering Heights

8.  KAY FRANCIS (Maida Walker), In Name Only

9.  OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND (Lady Penelope Gray), The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex

10. OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND (Melanie Hamilton Wilkes), Gone With the Wind

 

and...

 

MARIE NEY (Patience Merlyn), Jamaica Inn

UNA MERKEL (Lily Belle Callahan), Destry Rides Again

ONA MUNSON (Belle Watling), Gone With the Wind

LAURA HOPE CREWS (Aunt Pittypat Hamilton), Gone With the Wind

GLADYS GEORGE (Panama Smith), The Roaring Twenties

MARJORIE MAIN (Mrs. Dolley), Another Thin Man

JANE DARWELL (Dolly Meriwether), Gone With the Wind

MARIA OUSPENSKAYA (‘Grandmother’ Janou), Love Affair

CLARA BLANDICK (Auntie “Em” Emily), The Wizard of Oz

EDNA MAY OLIVER (Mrs. Sarah McKlennan), Drums Along the Mohawk

IDA LUPINO (Bessie "Broke"), The Light That Failed

PHYLLIS POVAH (Edith, “Mrs. Phelps” Potter), The Women

LEONA ROBERTS (Caroline Meade), Gone With the Wind

GERALDINE FITZGERALD (Ann King), Dark Victory

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NEXT CATEGORY FOR ME: 1939 BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS (next category will be either Sunday or Monday);

 

WINNER: Hattie McDaniel for GONE WITH THE WIND:

 

OTHER NOMINEES: No order; thanks to Princess for her thoughts on multiple nominations for one performer

 

 

Butterfly McQueen in Gone With The Wind

Margaret Hamilton in The Wizard of Oz

Billie Burke in The Wizard of Oz

Marjorie Main in The Women

Virginia Grey in the Women

Virginia Grey in Another Thin Man

Ruth Hussey in Another Thin Man

Flora Robson in Wuthering Heights

Geraldine Fitzgerald in Wuthering Heights

Greer Garson in Goodbye, Mr. Chips

Kay Francis in In Name Only

Edited by GregoryPeckfan
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1939 - Okay, I gave in to peer pressure this time and decided Bela Lugosi and Lionel Atwill are probably not co-leads in Son of Frankenstein, but they're pretty close, darn it...

 

Actor

Lon Chaney, Jr. - Of Mice and Men***
Ralph Richardson - Clouds Over Europe
Ralph Richardson - The Four Feathers
Basil Rathbone - Son of Frankenstein
James Cagney - The Roaring Twenties
James Cagney - Each Dawn I Die
Louis Hayward - The Man in the Iron Mask
...
Don Ameche - Midnight ; Don Ameche - The Three Musketeers ; Robert Newton - Jamaica Inn
 
Actress
 
Vivien Leigh - Gone With the Wind***
Marie Wilson - Sweepstakes Winner
Claudette Colbert - It's a Wonderful World
 
Supporting Actor

C. Aubrey Smith - The Four Feathers***
Bela Lugosi - Son of Frankenstein
Lionel Atwill - Son of Frankenstein

Humphrey Bogart - The Roaring Twenties
Brian Donlevy - Beau Geste

...
Frank Morgan - The Wizard of Oz ; John Wray - Each Dawn I Die ; Boris Karloff - Tower of London ; Jean Renoir - The Rules of the Game ; George Merritt - Clouds Over Europe ; Henry Hull - Miracles for Sale ; Joseph Schildkraut - The Man in the Iron Mask

 
Supporting Actress
 

Margaret Hamilton - The Wizard of Oz***

Gladys George - The Roaring Twenties

Billie Burke - The Wizard of Oz

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The top five in the Best Actor category are pretty much a dead heat. There are many fine performances in the Actress and Supporting Actress categories, but the winners lap the field. Once again the Supporting Actor category is the weakest, though this year there are many enjoyable performances.

 

Best Actor of 1938:

 

Clark Gable, GONE WITH THE WIND*

Jean Gabin, LE JOUR SE LEVE (DAYBREAK)

James Stewart, MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON

Robert Donat, GOODBYE, MR. CHIPS

Charles Laughton, THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME

 

Honorable mention: Brian Aherne, JUAREZ; Charles Boyer, LOVE AFFAIR; Paul Muni, JUAREZ; Laurence Olivier, WUTHERING HEIGHTS; Claude Rains, DAUGHTERS COURAGEOUS; Tyrone Power, THE RAINS CAME

 

Best Actress of 1938:

 

Vivien Leigh, GONE WITH THE WIND*

Bette Davis, DARK VICTORY

Arletty, LE JOUR SE LEVE (DAYBREAK)

Greta Garbo, NINOTCHKA

Claudette Colbert, MIDNIGHT

 

Honorable mention: Irene Dunne, LOVE AFFAIR; Judy Garland, THE WIZARD OF OZ; Claire Trevor, STAGECOACH

 

Best Supporting Actor of 1938:

 

Bert Lahr, THE WIZARD OF OZ*

Pierre Brasseur, LE JOUR SE LEVE (DAYBREAK)

Brian Donlevy, BEAU GESTE

John Barrymore, MIDNIGHT

Claude Rains, MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON

 

Honorable mention:

 

Ray Bolger, THE WIZARD OF OZ; Thomas Mitchell, STAGECOACH; Thomas Mitchell, GONE WITH THE WIND

 

Best Supporting Actress of 1938:

 

Olivia De Havilland, GONE WITH THE WIND*

Maria Ouspenskaya, THE RAINS CAME

Hattie McDaniel, GONE WITH THE WIND

Margaret Hamilton, THE WIZARD OF OZ

Greer Garson, GOODBYE, MR. CHIPS

 

Honorable mention: Mary Astor, MIDNIGHT; Mary Boland, THE WOMEN; Joan Crawford, THE WOMEN; Geraldine Fitzgerald, DARK VICTORY; Geraldine Fitzgerald, WUTHERING HEIGHTS; Gladys George, THE ROARING TWENTIES; Ona Munson, GONE WITH THE WIND; Edna May Oliver, DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK; Rosalind Russell, THE WOMEN

 

It Ain't What I'd Call Romantic Award to Cary Grant in ONLY ANGELS HAVE WINGS, who only asks Jean Arthur to stay with him after the death of his buddy, Thomas Mitchell, who seems to have been looking after him in a quasi-spousal capacity. Run, Jean, Run!

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While it's widely regarded as the greatest movie year of all time, 1939 falls short when it comes to my purposes in this thread. Everyone has made very interesting choices, but unfortunately I have seen 90% of them already. Out of those few that I haven't, I have a few taped already to watch, which only leaves 2 or 3 to look for, such as The Light That Failed. And that one was already on my radar from the Top Ten Films thread. The only one so far that I haven't seen or haven't heard of is Sweepstakes Winner submitted by Kay. So extra kudos to Kay!

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While it's widely regarded as the greatest movie year of all time, 1939 falls short when it comes to my purposes in this thread. Everyone has made very interesting choices, but unfortunately I have seen 90% of them already. Out of those few that I haven't, I have a few taped already to watch, which only leaves 2 or 3 to look for, such as The Light That Failed. And that one was already on my radar from the Top Ten Films thread. The only one so far that I haven't seen or haven't heard of is Sweepstakes Winner submitted by Kay. So extra kudos to Kay!

True.  I have not seen as high a percentage of movies from this year as you have by a long shot, and most of the films I have not seen I had heard of before.  However, this is not true of the many foreign films listed.

 

Kay does indeed list ones I've not seen all of them.  Even if I did not like Pigskin Parade, I want to see everything Judy Garland made, so yes indeed: Kudos to Kay!

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I think it's safe to say that in The Hunchback of Notre Dame Charles Laughton gave the best performance of 1939 NOT nominated for an Academy Award.

 

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Beneath that incredible grotesque makeup, Laughton magnificently captured the torment of Victor Hugo's bell ringer. Some have said that Quasimodo's relationship with the cold blooded, villainous Frollo (Cedric Hardwicke) is analogous to that of a dog eager to please his master.

 

It's a film of so many highlights. However, a particularly special one for me, as far as Laughton's performance is concerned, occurs when Esmeralda (Maureen O'Hara) pours some water into his mouth after his public f l o g g i n g.

 

At first Laughton shows us shame when she steps upon the whipping post. This is the first time that he sees her following his kidnapping of her (at Frollo's order). He initially resists her temptation to give him any water, leaning far back from her as she offers him the water from a canister.

 

But then, after the first drops of the water touch his parched lips, Laughton immediately straightens, a look of appreciation now on his face. Then, in a moment that can rip the heart from a statue, his lips begin to tremble as tears well in his eye. He tips his head backward and gratefully laps at the water the gypsy girl pours into his mouth.

 

Afterwards, finally getting his release from the whipping post, he stumbles, falling at times, until he's back inside the safety of the church.  A beaten, exhausted Laughton closes the great doors behind him, then turns to Frollo looking at him silently.

 

In one of the most heart wrenching moments captured on film, a weeping Laughton simply says, "She gave me water." He stumbles away, only to collapse on the church floor.

 

This "great malformed monster" has been transformed by Laughton into the equivalent of a beaten animal grateful for an unexpected kindness.

 

It's a performance that is both painful and beautiful, a towering achievement from an actor who was always keenly aware of his own ugliness, and was able to convey the sensitivity of a social outcast in his portrait of the hunchback.

 

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"She gave me water."

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While it's widely regarded as the greatest movie year of all time, 1939 falls short when it comes to my purposes in this thread. Everyone has made very interesting choices, but unfortunately I have seen 90% of them already. Out of those few that I haven't, I have a few taped already to watch, which only leaves 2 or 3 to look for, such as The Light That Failed. And that one was already on my radar from the Top Ten Films thread. The only one so far that I haven't seen or haven't heard of is Sweepstakes Winner submitted by Kay. So extra kudos to Kay!

Lawrence, I was thinking the same thing, that we are mainly citing the same group of films, which has not been true in previous years. Is it because the 1939 mystique has led to the showing of more films from that year? Even a film like MIDNIGHT, unknown to me as I was growing up, has had a fair amount of exposure on TCM and elsewhere.

 

Some of the less celebrated films I jotted down but didn't include in the final lists:

 

THE CAT AND THE CANARY - Bob Hope and Paulette Goddard are a surprisingly good couple in this comedy/mystery.

CONFESSIONS OF A NAZI SPY

FIFTH AVENUE GIRL - Ginger Rogers stars as the young woman who pretends to be rich man Walter Connolly's mistress and turns his household upside down. Gregory La Cava directs.

LET US LIVE - Henry Fonda and Maureen O'Sullivan star in this proto-noir, strikingly directed by John Brahm. If you like, say, THEY LIVE BY NIGHT, you should check this one out.

 

All of the actors named perhaps should be added to the honorable mention list.

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Some of the less celebrated films I jotted down but didn't include in the final lists:

 

THE CAT AND THE CANARY - Bob Hope and Paulette Goddard are a surprisingly good couple in this comedy/mystery.

 

 

The Cat and the Canary is one of my favourite 1939 films and, as you said, kingrat, Hope and Goddard are a strong screen pairing. (They would be even better together the following year in Ghost Breakers, in my opinion).

 

But this film is a beautifully mounted production, with great sets, elegant black and white photography and an appropriately eerie musical score. The film's climax, played straight for thrills, in which Goddard is chased by a killer, is genuinely exciting.

 

tumblr_nl33kjGDlE1tkixzco1_1280.jpg

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Among other things, 1939 is known as the year that was the re-birth of the western as big budget Hollywood entertainment, a genre that would largely rule at the box office for the next 40 years, or so.

 

Westerns had been getting churned out during the '30s but they were almost always quickie Bs shot in a manner of a few weeks, maybe even days. Prior to 1939 the only major A productions of the talkies had been Raoul Walsh's The Big Trail, which failed to make a major star of John Wayne in 1930, and De Mille's The Plainsman in 1936.

 

Perhaps the biggest budget western of 1939 was another De Mille extravaganza, Union Pacific. But the most influential one would be John Ford's Stagecoach, the film which finally did make a star of Wayne, as well as bring the genre further legitimacy by winning an Academy Award for one of its cast members (Thomas Mitchell). The following year another western, The Westerner, would perform the same trick for Walter Brennan.

 

300px-Stagecoach-1939.jpg

 

Other big budget westerns of 1939 would include Fox's Technicolor Jesse James (colossally big at the box office), Warner's vibrant Technicolor Dodge City (with one of the biggest, most elaborate saloon brawls ever staged), Frontier Marshal, Man of Conquest, and the western spoof, Destry Rides Again, which helped re-vitalize the career of Marlene Dietrich, recently branded box office poison. The latter would be James Stewart's sole western until the 1950s, when a more mature, tougher Stewart would become, rather unexpectedly, one of the biggest western stars of the decade.

 

The western was so big in 1939 that Warners even forced a couple of city dudes, James Cagney and Humphrey Bogart, into one of them, The Oklahoma Kid. The following year the likes of W. C. Fields, Mae West and the Marx Brothers would be appearing in western satires.

 

1939.jesse.james.jpg

 

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gal_Stewart_James_4.jpg

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Here are my choices of the 83 films I've seen from 1939 for…

 

Best Supporting Actor of 1939

 

1.  CLAUDE RAINS (Senator Joseph Harrison Paine), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

2.  FRANK MORGAN (Professor Marvel/"Emerald City doorman/Coachman/Palace guard"/"Oz,the first wizard                  deluxe - the great Oz"), The Wizard of Oz

3.  BERT LAHR (Zeke/"the Cowardly Lion"), The Wizard of Oz

4.  RAY BOLGER (Hunk/"the Scarecrow"), The Wizard of Oz

5.  THOMAS MITCHELL (Dr. “Doc” Josiah Boone), Stagecoach

 

6.  BRIAN AHERNE (Emperor Maximilian von Habsburg), Juarez

7.  JACK HALEY (Hickory/"the Tin Woodsman"), The Wizard of Oz

8.  EDWARD ARNOLD (James "Jim" Taylor), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

9.  BRIAN DONLEVY (Kent), Destry Rides Again

10. GEORGE BANCROFT (Sheriff Curley Wilcox), Stagecoach

 

and...

 

LON CHANEY, JR. (Lennie Small), Of Mice and Men*

THOMAS MITCHELL (Diz Moore), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

BELA LUGOSI (Ygor), Son of Frankenstein

JULES BERRY (M. Valentin), Le Jour Se Leve

HARRY CAREY ("President of the Senate"), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

CEDRIC HARDWICKE (John Frollo), The Hunchback of Notre Dame

EMLYN WILLIAMS (Joe Gowan), The Stars Look Down

WALTER HUSTON (Torpenhow), The Light That Failed

NIGEL BRUCE (Dr. Watson), The Hound of the Baskervilles

ROMAN BOHNEN (Candy), Of Mice and Men

BRIAN DONLEVY (Sgt. Markoff), Beau Geste

EUGENE PALLETTE (James "Jim" Clinton), First Love

LEIGH WHIPPER (Crooks), Of Mice and Men

CEDRIC HARDWICKE (Dr. David Livingstone), Stanley and Livingstone

WALTER HAMPDEN (Claude Frollo, “the Archdeacon”), The Hunchback of Notre Dame

HARRY DAVENPORT (Doctor Meade), Gone With the Wind

CHARLES WINNINGER (Washington “Wash” Dimsdale), Destry Rides Again

C. AUBREY SMITH (General Burroughs), The Four Feathers

PAUL HENREID (Staefel), Goodbye, Mr. Chips

SAM JAFFE (Corporal Gunga Din), Gunga Din

THOMAS MITCHELL (Clopin, King of the Beggars), The Hunchback of Notre Dame

LYN HARDING (John Hamilton Wetherby), Goodbye, Mr. Chips

MILES MANDER (Lockwood), Wuthering Heights

EDMOND O’BRIEN (Pierre Gringoire, #7419 Beggars Union), The Hunchback of Notre Dame

 

*I think I am probably the only person to put Lon Chaney, Jr. in the supporting category for Of Mice and Men.  I saw it again quite recently but perhaps this is good reason to give it yet another go.  

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Here are my choices of the 83 films I've seen from 1939 for…

 

Best Supporting Actor of 1939

 

C. AUBREY SMITH (General Burroughs), The Four Feathers

 

Great collection of names, Bogie.

 

Alexander Korda's handsome production of The Four Feathers is one of the best of the British Empire epics, set in India or, in this case, Africa, during the '30s, with quite stunning Technicolor and intelligent performances. And it has perhaps the quintessential performance of C. Aubrey Smith's career, as the retired army general sitting around the table with his cronies, forever telling tales of the Crimea when "men were men," and re-iterating his version of how he lead the legendary charge at Balaclava. The film is worth the price of admission alone for the scene in which Harry Faversham (John Clements) finally gets Smith to admit what really happened at the charge. "Confound the man," Smith proclaims, "I'll never be able to tell that story again!"

 

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The Cat and the Canary is one of my favourite 1939 films and, as you said, kingrat, Hope and Goddard are a strong screen pairing. (They would be even better together the following year in Ghost Breakers, in my opinion).

 

A reminder of the 1927 film, with Laura La Plante:

 

llp.png

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Here are my choices of the 83 films I've seen from 1939 for…

 

Best Supporting Actor of 1939

 

1.  CLAUDE RAINS (Senator Joseph Harrison Paine), Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

 

Claude Rains was in the midst of a remarkable series of films and performances when Warners loaned him to Columbia to play Senator Paine. Much as I like Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, the final resolution, I have always felt, is classic Hollywood happy ending.

 

SPOILER ALERT: The young senator Smith has really lost in the battle for public opinion, if it were not for the convenience of Senator Paine having melodramatic conscience pangs in public, trying to shoot himself and blurting out for all to hear about the political corruption, of which he is playing a large part. Oh well, that Capra's for you. Rains, however, is still wonderful in his role.

 

But I'd like to make mention of another 1939 Rains films that occasionally comes on TCM, Daughters Courageous. This is largely an ensemble piece with almost the entire cast from the previous year's Four Daughters reunited, once again under the sensitive direction of Michael Curtiz. It's a different story and set of characters, even though there's a certain sameness about many of them.

 

But this time Rains has a far larger role than in the previous film, as a wanderlust father who, after 20 years of world travels, returns to his small town family, hoping to be accepted back into the family fold once again. Only there are complications, of course, the understandable resentment of his four daughters for having abandoned them years before, not to mention the fact that his wife (Fay Bainter) is about to marry again, and to a businessman (Donald Crisp) far more responsible than he has ever been.

 

If it sounds like a soaper that's because it is, but quite beautifully presented, in my opinion. John Garfield is back, playing another character with a chip on his shoulder. There's also the Lane Sisters and Gale Page as the wholesome daughters, along with the ever reliable May Robson.

 

Above all, though, I think that it's Rains's performance that particularly distinguishes this film. His character has charm and is a real story teller, if given the chance, but he's also tired and lonely. He's hoping that he can win his family back to him again with that considerable charm. I think this is one of Claude Rains's most engaging performances, even if it is less celebrated than many others (such as Senator Paine).

 

Daughters Courageous is a warm piece of sentiment. And just when you think you have the direction of the story figured out, it has an ending that I suspect will surprise you. For those who have yet to see it, this is a 1939 film that I heartily recommend the next time it's scheduled to come on TCM. Fans of Claude Rains, in particular, will not be disappointed.

 

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Claude Rains was in the midst of a remarkable series of films and performances when Warners loaned him to Columbia to play Senator Paine. Much as I like Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, the final resolution, I have always felt, is classic Hollywood happy ending.

 

SPOILER ALERT: The young senator Smith has really lost in the battle for public opinion, if it were not for the convenience of Senator Paine having melodramatic conscience pangs in public, trying to shoot himself and blurting out for all to hear about the political corruption, of which he is playing a large part. Oh well, that Capra's for you. Rains, however, is still wonderful in his role.

 

 

Claude Rains managed to pull off that ending IMO.  A lesser actor may not have been able to achieve that.  I'm so with him in those intense moments that it was quite easy to overlook the convenience of the resolution.

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Claude Rains managed to pull off that ending IMO.  A lesser actor may not have been able to achieve that.  I'm so with him in those intense moments that it was quite easy to overlook the convenience of the resolution.

 

That's why I made the comment, Bogie. Rains is so good in that scene, and you can get so captured by his sudden outburst, that you can easily overlook the contrivance of the writing. Rains's performance is crucial in helping to sell the ending.

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Tom and Bogie, thanks for all the love directed to Claude Rains. Peering into my crystal ball, I get the definite impression his name will be mentioned frequently as we visit the films of the forties. DAUGHTERS COURAGEOUS is a film worth seeing, for all the reasons mentioned by Tom in his excellent review.

 

Tom, I also really enjoyed your discussion of the resurgence of the western in 1939. Most of us have seen westerns we liked a lot more than JESSE JAMES, but it's hardly a surprise that the 1939 audience liked Tyrone Power and Henry Fonda in Technicolor.

 

Bogie mentioned a film I'd like to see, THE STARS LOOK DOWN, and several of you have mentioned one I saw on TV several decades ago, THE LIGHT THAT FAILED, and would love to see again.

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Tom and Bogie, thanks for all the love directed to Claude Rains. Peering into my crystal ball, I get the definite impression his name will be mentioned frequently as we visit the films of the forties. DAUGHTERS COURAGEOUS is a film worth seeing, for all the reasons mentioned by Tom in his excellent review.

 

Tom, I also really enjoyed your discussion of the resurgence of the western in 1939. Most of us have seen westerns we liked a lot more than JESSE JAMES, but it's hardly a surprise that the 1939 audience liked Tyrone Power and Henry Fonda in Technicolor.

 

Bogie mentioned a film I'd like to see, THE STARS LOOK DOWN, and several of you have mentioned one I saw on TV several decades ago, THE LIGHT THAT FAILED, and would love to see again.

 

I'm on the lookout for the original British version of The Stars Look Down which has a slightly different beginning and ending and does not have the voice over narration by Lionel Barrymore.  I'll let you guess which version is the slightly 'happier' one.  There is a good description of the differences on wikipedia.  

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While it's widely regarded as the greatest movie year of all time, 1939 falls short when it comes to my purposes in this thread. Everyone has made very interesting choices, but unfortunately I have seen 90% of them already. Out of those few that I haven't, I have a few taped already to watch, which only leaves 2 or 3 to look for, such as The Light That Failed. And that one was already on my radar from the Top Ten Films thread. The only one so far that I haven't seen or haven't heard of is Sweepstakes Winner submitted by Kay. So extra kudos to Kay!

 

Maybe it's reassuring in a way.  We are on the right track.  And we can always find reasons to watch them all again.

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Another good 1939 effort to which no one has made reference is The Real Glory. A Sam Goldwyn production, Henry Hathaway directed this historical adventure, set in the Philippines in 1906 at a time when various nations, including the U.S., were flexing their imperialistic muscles there.

 

Gary Cooper plays a doctor with a humanitarian streak in him, as part of a soldiers three formula (shades of Lives of a Bengal Lancer and Gunga Din), his two buddies here being David Niven and Broderick Crawford. Andrea Leeds is the leading lady. Cooper is always good as a larger than life hero, but this film also allows him to show some sensitivity.

 

The film is noteworthy for action scenes that are more realistic in their presentation than most other films of this period, dealing, in particular, with a Moro uprising against their American imperialists. The film presents the Muslim Moros as fierce fanatics, almost mythical in their brutality and courage, who scare the local Filipino populace.

 

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