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Bogie56

Your Favourite Performances from 1930 to present are...

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My 1935 picks, in approximate order of preference. I had a very difficult time in choosing the best actor this year between my top two choices, knowing that whichever one I finally selected would make my feel like apologizing to the number two pick. With best actress, however, I had no such internal debate. There was only one real choice for me.

 

1935 is my favourite year of the talkies thus far.

 

BEST ACTOR

 

Charles Laughton, MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY

Ronald Colman, A TALE OF TWO CITIES

Boris Karloff, BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN

Fredric March, LES MISERABLES

Peter Lorre, MAD LOVE

 

Honourable Mention: Edward G. Robinson in The Whole Town's Talking, Charles Laughton in Les Miserables, Gary Cooper in Lives of a Bengal Lancer, Franchot Tone in Lives of a Bengal Lancer, Robert Donat in The 39 Steps, Victor McLaglen in The Informer, Paul Muni in Bordertown, Clark Gable in Mutiny on the Bounty, Boris Karloff in The Black Room, Peter Lorre in Crime and Punishment, Charles Laughton in Ruggles of Red Gap.

 

BEST ACTRESS

 

Katharine Hepburn, ALICE ADAMS

Greta Garbo, ANNA KARENINA

Carole Lombard, HANDS ACROSS THE TABLE

Marlene Dietrich, DEVIL IS A WOMAN

Jean Harlow, CHINA SEAS

 

Honourable Mention: Jean Arthur in The Whole Town's Talking, Bette Davis in Bordertown

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

 

Ernest Thesiger, BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN

Roland Young, DAVID COPPERFIELD

Basil Rathbone, DAVID COPPERFIELD

W. C. Fields, DAVID COPPERFIELD

Erik Rhodes, TOP HAT

 

Honourable Mention: Victor Jory in A Midsummer Night's Dream, Cary Grant in Sylvia Scarlett, Basil Rathbone in Anna Karenina, Sir Guy Standing in Lives of a Bengal Lancer, Frank Morgan in Naughty Marietta, Ian Keith in The Crusades.

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

 

Edna May Oliver, DAVID COPPERFIELD

Blanche Yurka, A TALE OF TWO CITIES

Margot Grahame, THE INFORMER (Added Upon Reconsideration)

Isabel Jewell, A TALE OF TWO CITIES

Una O'Connor, BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN

 

Honourable Mention: Hattie McDaniel in Alice Adams, Mary Boland in Ruggles of Red Gap, Ann Shoemaker in Alice Adams.

 

SPECIAL HAM OF THE YEAR AWARD (Two Winners!):

 

Basil Rathbone, CAPTAIN BLOOD

Bela Lugosi, THE RAVEN

 

GOOD SPORT OF THE YEAR AWARD:

 

Margaret Dumont, A NIGHT AT THE OPERA

 

GREATEST SYNERGY OF THE YEAR:

 

Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland, CAPTAIN BLOOD

Robert Donat and Madeleine Carroll, THE 39 STEPS

Gary Cooper and Franchot Tone, LIVES OF A BENGAL LANCER

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Here are the current choices for 1935:

 

Best Actor:

 

Charles Laughton, MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY*

Ronald Colman, A TALE OF TWO CITIES

Paul Muni, BORDERTOWN

Robert Donat, THE 39 STEPS

Fredric March, THE DARK ANGEL

 

Best Actress:

 

Francoise Rosay, LA KERMESSE HEROIQUE*

Katharine Hepburn, ALICE ADAMS

Bette Davis, DANGEROUS

Marlene Dietrich, THE DEVIL IS A WOMAN

Josephine Hutchinson, OIL FOR THE LAMPS OF CHINA

 

Honorable mention: Madeleine Carroll, THE 39 STEPS; Bette Davis, BORDERTOWN; Miriam Hopkins, BARBARY COAST; Carole Lombard, HANDS ACROSS THE TABLE; Merle Oberon, THE DARK ANGEL

 

Best Supporting Actor:

 

Eric Blore, TOP HAT*

Herbert Marshall, THE DARK ANGEL

Franchot Tone, MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY

Walter Brennan, BARBARY COAST

W.C. Fields, DAVID COPPERFIELD

 

Honorable mention: Ralph Bellamy, HANDS ACROSS THE TABLE; Cary Grant, SYLVIA SCARLETT; Cesar Romero, THE DEVIL IS A WOMAN

 

Best Supporting Actress:

 

Blanche Yurka, A TALE OF TWO CITIES*

Edna May Oliver, A TALE OF TWO CITIES

Margaret Lindsay, BORDERTOWN

Peggy Ashcroft, THE 39 STEPS

Janet Beecher, THE DARK ANGEL

 

Honorable mention: Jean Muir, OIL FOR THE LAMPS OF CHINA

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I find great beauty in Harmony Lane, and great performances, particularly by Montgomery and Venable.

 

I'm actually quite stunned to learn of this movie. I can't conceive of how I managed not to hear of it. The reason being that Stephen Foster is our local legend. The town I live in is adjacent to White Springs, the very small home of the Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center and State Park:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Foster_Folk_Culture_Center_State_Park

 

Growing up and living around here, you hear his name all of the time. Every grade school from several counties around makes at least one, usually more, visits to the Park each year. I'm surprised we weren't all made to watch this film repeatedly.

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I have not heard of Harmony Lane either as well as not having heard of Douglas Montgomery.  Thanks, Swithin.

 

 

As I recall, I think you like the 1933 film of Little Women. Douglass Montgomery plays Laurie in that film -- the boy next door. In 1935, in addition to Harmony Lane, he appeared in The Mystery of Edwin Drood as the brooding and possibly half-caste Neville Landless (half English, half Singhalese). Montgomery appeared in a third film in 1935, of which I know nothing -- Lady Tubbs.

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Le Kermisse Heroique is another movie I have never heard of before.

 

There are two distinct groups of films I've not seen. Those I have not seen, and those I don't know at all.

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Looking back now upon my selection of best supporting actors, it's apparent that I have a thing for eccentrics.

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I haven't seen enough films from this year to be able to create these lists.

 

But these are my picks:

 

BEST ACTOR:

 

Errol Flynn, Captain Blood

 

BEST ACTRESS:

 

Katharine Hepburn, Alice Adams

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR:

 

Fred Stone, Alice Adams

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS:

 

Rosalind Russell, China Seas

 

BEST EXAMPLE OF HOW DENTAL WORK CAN IMPROVE WHAT IS ALREADY CLOSE TO PERFECTION:

 

Errol Flynn's old teeth, Captain Blood

 

WORST DRIVER:

 

Bette Davis, Dangerous

 

BEST DANCE NUMBER:

 

"Top Hat, White Tie and Tails," Fred Astaire, Top Hat

 

BEST DANCING DRESS:

 

Ginger Rogers' feather dress, Top Hat

 

 

 

 

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BEST EXAMPLE OF HOW DENTAL WORK CAN IMPROVE WHAT IS ALREADY CLOSE TO PERFECTION:

 

Errol Flynn's old teeth, Captain Blood

 

 

69c2b3b6a315bac24c8abd31c4d5d1aa.jpg

 

Let's not forget Gable.

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RE: BEST DANCING DRESS:

 

Astaire REALLY HATED TH.AT DRESS.

 

The feathers got everywhere and made him sneeze.

 

I have a book called MOVIES WE LOVE:  100 COLLECTIBLE CLASSICS:

 

 

The author is Frank Miller and there is a forward by Robert Osbourne.

 

Astaire and Hermes Pan wrote up their own lyrics to Cheek to Cheek and serenaded Ginger:

 

 

Feathers,

I hate feathers,

And I hate them so that I can hardly speak

And I never find the happiness I seek

With those chicken feathers dancing

Cheek to Cheek

 

 

 

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LA KERMESSE HEROIQUE (aka CARNIVAL IN FLANDERS) was shown on TCM a couple of years ago. It was famous in its day, then became less well known. A town in Belgium is about to be conquered by the Spanish during the religious wars of the seventeenth century. The men run and hide, but the women find a way to conquer the conquerors.

 

OIL FOR THE LAMPS OF CHINA was shown on TCM three or four years ago. It's based on a best-selling novel by Alice Tisdale Hobart and was directed by Mervyn LeRoy. Pat O'Brien plays an oil company employee in China, and Josephine Hutchinson is his wife. The theme of the film is the sacrifice that the woman is expected to make for her husband and the sacrifice that the husband is expected to make for his employer. The climax of the film is the choice O'Brien must make between helping his wife through a difficult pregnancy and helping to put out an oil fire in a remote location. Although some of the scenes are stagy, this is one of the most intelligent films of the period. The company bosses aren't mustache-twirling villains, but they think nothing of appropriating the invention Pat O'Brien makes, and he doesn't feel that he has been wronged. Hollywood has rarely made good films about big business, but this one is an exception.

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1935--Best Actor: Single Winners are marked with two asterisks:ties with four asterisks:

 

Boris Karloff in "Bride of Frankenstein"****

 

Charles Laughton in "Ruggles of Red Gap"

 

Clark Gable in "Mutiny On The Bounty"

 

Robert Donat in "The Ghost Goes West****

 

Edward G. Robinson in "The Whole Town's Talking"

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Best Actress:

 

Bette Davis in "Dangerous"

 

Mary Boland in "Ruggles of Red Gap"

 

Katharine Hepburn in "Alice Adams"****

 

Miriam Hopkins in "Becky Sharp"****

 

Jeanette MacDonald in "Naughty Marietta"

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Best Supporting Actor:

 

Ernest Thesiger in "The Bride of Frankenstein"

 

W.C. Fields in "David Copperfield"

 

Franchot Tone in "Mutiny On The Bounty"

 

Basil Rathbone in "A Tale of Two Cities"

 

Basil Rathbone in "Captain Blood"**

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Best Supporting Actress:

 

Edna Mae Oliver in "A Tale of Two Cities"****

 

Elsa Lanchester in "The Bride of Frankenstein"****

 

Elsa Lanchester in "The Ghost Goes West"

 

Olivia DeHavilland in "A Midsummer Night's Dream"

 

Margaret Dumont in "A Night at the Opera"

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Winners in Other Categories will be listed later in the week.

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69c2b3b6a315bac24c8abd31c4d5d1aa.jpg

 

Let's not forget Gable.

 

Didn't Clark Gable wear dentures? Thank goodness he got his eyebrows thinned out and wore his hair in a hipper fashion.  I would have never known that was Gable if you hadn't said so.

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1935 was the very first year of the New York Film Critics Circle Awards.  They were handed out in 1936.  It was only much later that they handed out supporting awards.  Here are the 1935 winners and nominees:

 

Best Actor

Charles Laughton, Mutiny on the Bounty and Ruggles of Red Gap*

Victor McLaglen, The Informer

 

Best Actress

Greta Garbo, Anna Karenina*

Katharine Hepburn, Alice Adams

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1935 - Once again the leading actress category is coming out short. This has been happening to me a lot, I'm afraid. Otherwise it was an outstanding year. Incidentally, I noticed that Tom and I picked the same favorites in three out of four categories, (I, too, have a thing for eccentrics.)
 

Actor
 
Charles Laughton - Ruggles of Red Gap
Peter Lorre - Crime and Punishment***
Peter Lorre - Mad Love
Paul Muni - Black Fury
Charlie Ruggles - Ruggles of Red Gap
...
Lionel Barrymore - Mark of the Vampire ; Freddie Bartholomew - David Copperfield (juvenile) ; James Cagney - A Midsummer Night's Dream ; Henry Hull - Werewolf of London ; Charles Laughton - Mutiny on the Bounty ; Victor McLaglen - The Informer ; Paul Muni - Dr. Socrates ; Basil Rathbone - Kind Lady ; Edward G. Robinson - The Whole Town's Talking
 
Actress

Mary Boland - Ruggles of Red Gap
Katharine Hepburn - Alice Adams***
Aline MacMahon - Kind Lady
Claire Trevor - Black Sheep
 
Supporting Actor
 
Edward Arnold - Crime and Punishment
Erik Rhodes - Top Hat
Ernest Thesiger - Bride of Frankenstein***
Roland Young - David Copperfield
Roland Young - Ruggles of Red Gap
...
Colin Clive - Mad Love ; W.C. Fields - David Copperfield ; Dwight Frye - Bride of Frankenstein ; Warner Oland - Werewolf of London ; Lennox Pawle - David Copperfield ; Basil Rathbone - David Copperfield ; Grady Sutton - Man on The Flying Trapeze

Supporting Actress
 
Helen Broderick - Top Hat
Mrs. Patrick Campbell - Crime and Punishment
Elsa Lanchester - Bride of Frankenstein
Edna May Oliver - David Copperfield***
Maureen O'Sullivan - David Copperfield
...
Hattie McDaniel - Alice Adams ; Una O'Connor - Bride of Frankenstein ; Una O'Connor - The Informer ; ZaSu Pitts - Ruggles of Red Gap
 
Best Synergy
 
W.C. Fields and Roland Young - David Copperfield

Charlie Ruggles and Roland Young - Ruggles of Red Gap***

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One thing reading all of your lists today has shown me is that I need to rewatch Alice Adams. I watched it once, probably 20+ years ago. It was okay, but it didn't make a huge impression on me. And I'm a K. Hepburn fan. But I didn't even list her in my nominees for this year.

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One thing reading all of your lists today has shown me is that I need to rewatch Alice Adams. I watched it once, probably 20+ years ago. It was okay, but it didn't make a huge impression on me. And I'm a K. Hepburn fan. But I didn't even list her in my nominees for this year.

 

 

I saw Alice Adams recently as part of the Star of the Month look at Fred McMurray.  It was an early film of his and Hepburn gave him a lot of help and advice.

 

If I had not seen it so recently, I would likely not be able to include it this week.  I have seen a lot more movies once and that is it than recently seen. 

 

I see that Peter Lorre is getting a lot of love and that makes me happy. 

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One thing reading all of your lists today has shown me is that I need to rewatch Alice Adams. I watched it once, probably 20+ years ago. It was okay, but it didn't make a huge impression on me. And I'm a K. Hepburn fan. But I didn't even list her in my nominees for this year.

 

I love Alice Adams.  I watch it each time it airs on TCM as I have not yet purchased my own copy.

 

It's also a very early role for Fred MacMurray and I thought he was excellent.

 

One of the best scenes in the film is the scene where the Adams family invites MacMurray over for dinner.  It is insanely hot outside and in their efforts to impress the affluent MacMurray (the Adamses are on a much lower rung on the social ladder than MacMurray) they end up serving a very heavy meal.  MacMurray is noticeably sweating and it is difficult to eat.  Their ice cream comes out as soup.  MacMurray, who really cares about Hepburn, is trying so hard to be a good sport.  While all this is happening, Hattie McDaniel is hilarious as the maid they hire to serve the family and their guest.  She's a very slovenly and is an awful cook.  

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Supporting Actor

 

 Lennox Pawle - David Copperfield

 

 

I've always been curious about Lennox Pawle. Even if he isn't the first character actor from David Copperfield that comes to mind, his simple minded Mr. Dick seems completely Dickensian to me.

 

an-old-and-intimate-friend.jpg

 

I found a little bit about him on the internet. Born in England in 1872, he worked on the stage for most of his life, appearing in about a dozen films, many of them lost. His two most prominent films, aside from David Copperfield, were The Sin of Madelon Claudet and Mata Hari. Copperfield would be his third last film appearance, dying of a cerebral hemmorhage in February, 1936.

 

But I was charmed by an exchange of letters he once had with a theatrical manager, Robert Arthur.

 

Here is their correspondence in its entirety:

 

Regent St., October 2, 1902

Dear Mr. Lennox Pawle,

What are your terms for pantomime?

Yours faithfully,

Robert Arthur

 

Green Club Room, October 4, 1902

Dear Mr. Robert Arthur,

My terms for pantomime are £30 a week

Yours faithfully,

Lennox Pawle

 

Regent St., October 6, 1902

Dear Mr. Lennox Pawle,

Before I paid you £30 a week for pantomime, I should like to see you in pantomime.

Yours faithfully,

Robert Arthur

 

Green Club Room, October 8, 1902

Dear Mr. Robert Arthur,

If you saw me in pantomime you wouldn’t pay me £30 a week.

Yours faithfully,

Lennox Pawle

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I've always been curious about Lennox Pawle. Even if he isn't the first character actor from David Copperfield that comes to mind, his simple minded Mr. Dick seems completely Dickensian to me.

 

 

He appeared on Broadway fairly regularly, from 1910-1932:

 

https://www.ibdb.com/Person/View/55755

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One thing reading all of your lists today has shown me is that I need to rewatch Alice Adams. I watched it once, probably 20+ years ago. It was okay, but it didn't make a huge impression on me. And I'm a K. Hepburn fan. But I didn't even list her in my nominees for this year.

 

I like Hepburn generally, but I do like her more than usual in Alice Adams. I find it to be a curiously touching performance of a character that I could have easily found entirely snooty and unappealing. She's ashamed of her lower-class upbringing, embarrassed by her family, and has developed this clumsily snobbish front that she is constantly tripping over. Class has become such a fixation that she has twisted herself into a neurotic mess, making her seem a bit pitiful. In the dinner party scene with Hattie McDaniel everything goes so wrong she becomes increasingly desperate and dismayed, twisting the scenario into an even greater quagmire of embarrassing fumbles to be politely overlooked. Fred MacMurray's endless patience and passiveness toward her every nervous quip and motion enhances Kate's already wonderful performance, too. He adds a lot while saying very little.

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Here are Danny Perry’s Alternate Oscar choices for 1935.  Winners in bold. 

 

1935 Best Actor

W.C. Fields, The Man on the Flying Trapeze* 

Robert Donat, The 39 Steps

Leslie Howard, The Scarlet Pimpernel

Boris Karloff, Bride of Frankenstein

Charles Laughton, Mutiny on the Bounty

Peter Lorre, Mad Love

 

1935 Best Actress

Katharine Hepburn, Alice Adams* 

Bette Davis, Dangerous

Miriam Hopkins, Becky Sharp

Margaret Sullavan, The Good Fairy 

 

 

And here are Michael Gerbert’s Golden Armchair choices for 1935:

 

Best Actor

Fred Astaire, Top Hat*

 

Best Actress

Ginger Rogers, Top Hat*

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Best Ensemble of 1935

 

The Cast of A Night at the Opera

 

 

If I had added this category since the beginning of this thread, the Marx brothers and friends would probably have won multiple times. They are great in this, as usual, and it's tough to single out individuals. Groucho, Chico, Harpo, Kitty Carlisle, Allan Jones, Walter King, Sig Ruman, and of course Margaret Dumont, all make the film an enjoyable time.

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Best Ensemble of 1935

 

The Cast of A Night at the Opera

 

 

If I had added this category since the beginning of this thread, the Marx brothers and friends would probably have won multiple times. They are great in this, as usual, and it's tough to single out individuals. Groucho, Chico, Harpo, Kitty Carlisle, Allan Jones, Walter King, Sig Ruman, and of course Margaret Dumont, all make the film an enjoyable time.

 

"When a woman has dinner with me I expect her to look me in the face. That's the price she has to pay."

 

George S. Kaufman and Morrie Ryskind are credited as scenarists. Undoubtedly there's a lot of Groucho there, too. But let's not leave the men responsible for the material off the credit list either.

 

By the way, I used that line when I took a woman dining once. Got a big laugh, especially since I tried it with the Groucho delivery. (I only steal from the best).

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Following the lead of Larry's specific  awards per day - much easier on my typing skills :

 

Here is my Best Ensemble Category:

 

Top 5 only then winner listed afterwards: not alphabetical: in order of entry in my notebook:

 

 

THE 39 STEPS: Donat, Carroll, Watson, Tearle, Ashcroft etc.

TOP HAT:  Astaire, Rogers, Blore, Horton, Rhodes, Broderick

DAVID COPPERFIELD: L.Barrymore, Rathbone, Bartholomew, Young, Fields, Lanchester etc.

MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY: Gable, Laughton, Tone, Crisp, etc.

CAPTAIN BLOOD: Flynn, DeHaviland, Rathbone, and Atwill

 

 

 

WINNER:

 

TOP HAT:

 

Benini!

Tap dancing over Gingers's bed

Mistaken identity

Eric Blore referring to himself in the plural

Eric Blore insulting an officer who he thinks does not understand English

The feather dress in Cheek to Cheek - yes, I am counting the feather dress as its own cast member status

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Here are my choices of the 65 films I've seen from 1935 for…

 

Best Supporting Actress of 1935

 

1.  MARGOT GRAHAME (Katie Madden), The Informer

2.  JESSIE RALPH (Nurse Peggotty), David Copperfield

3.  MAUREEN O'SULLIVAN (Kitty), Anna Karenina

4.  ZASU PITTS (Prunella Judson), Ruggles of Red Gap

5.  ALISON SKIPWORTH (Mrs. Williams), Dangerous

 

6.  MARY BOLAND (Effie Fould), Ruggles of Red Gap

7.  ROCHELLE HUDSON (Cosette), Les Miserables

8.  MARGARET LINDSAY (Dale Elwell), Bordertown

9.  ANN DVORAK (Jean Morgan Collins), G-Men

10. JESSIE RALPH (Mrs. Phoebe Brockwell Tembleton Fisher), Enchanted April

 

and...

 

ROSALIND RUSSELL (Sybil), China Seas

MARGARET DUMONT (Mrs. Claypool), A Night at the Opera

BLANCHE YURKA (Madame Defarge), A Tale of Two Cities

UNA MERKEL (Kitty Corbett), Broadway Melody of 1936

EVELYN VENABLE (Mildred Palmer), Alice Adams

MARGARET LINDSAY (Gail Armitage), Dangerous

ELIZABETH ALLAN (Clara Copperfield), David Copperfield

HEATHER ANGEL (Mary McPhillip), The Informer

CARLOTTA MONTI (‘Ambrose’s Secretary’), Man on the Flying Trapeze

MARGARET LINDSAY (Kay McCord), G-Men

ELLIOTT MASON (Mrs. MacNiff), The Ghost Goes West

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