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GregoryPeckfan--sorry to be late replying: yes, I was thinking of Bruce Dern in "Family Plot" (1976); thanks for the correction.  :)

 

 

Now, about Charles Laughton in "The Paradine Case" (1947); Yes he hammed it up, but he also helped secure Ethel Barrymore a Best Supporting Actress nomination.  She had only two or three scenes, but she painted a vivid and pitiable picture of a mentally abused wife in maybe ten minutes of film.  With the miles of film that was shot, Barrymore probably had scenes cut from the film.  I prefer to think Laughton overacted to get Barrymore a Academy Award nomination, instead of overacting without purpose.

 

Besides Ethel Barrymore, other favorite female performances in Hitchcock films:

 

Ingrid Bergman in "Notorious" (1946) and "Under Capricorn" (1949).

 

Grace Kelly in "To Catch a Thief" (1955) & "Rear Window" (1954).

 

Tippi Hedren in "The Birds" (1963) & "Marnie" (1964)--Hedren gave graceful performances in both films under stressful circumstances.

 

Nova Pilbeam in "Young and Innocent" (TCM title is "The Girl Was Young") (1937).

No such thing as replying "late" as there is no time limit. in this thread.  My love of Hitchcock is endless and I add different topics from time to time just because I am always ready to talk Hitchcock.

 

Regarding Fonda family, Henry did appear as the title character in The Wrong Man.

 

I have DVDs and VHS of several Alfred Hitchcock movies.  Young and Innocent is one such title.  I re-watched The Paradine Case shortly after Louis Jourdan died.  Ironically, it was the only movie of his that I actually owned.  It was his American screen debut and he was very good in it.

 

Regarding  Tippi and the circumstances under which she made her movies with Hitchcock:  I try not to think about it when I watching the movies.  The Birds is such a great movie that I have no problem with regard to this movie.  But I rarely watch Marnie.

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If you see this episode as you hear the music, everything really comes to life, and moves you deeply.

 

But back to Hitch - did Herrmann score the shower scene in "Psycho"?  That would probably be one of his movie masterpieces in terms of familiarity and "famousness" (I know, not a real word!).  As soon as you hear the first few bars of it, your hair stands on end, lol...

Yes, he scored the entire Psycho movie. :o

 

If famousness is not a real word, then it should be. :)

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GregoryPeckfan--my favorite piece of music he composed was "Storm Cloud Cantata" for the 1956 remake of "The Man Who Knew Too Much: the music and especially the lyrics help the suspense along immeasurably, IMHO; hope you can get the link in Canada. :)

 

 

Yes, I was able to listen to it.  It is a favourite of mine too.

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Some of my favourite Bernard Herrmann scores from non-Hitchcock movies;

 

1. Citizen Kane

2. The Bride Wore Black

3. Cape Fear

4. Garden of Evil

5. 5 Fingers

6. On Dangerous Ground

7. The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

8. The Day The Earth Stood Still

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Some of my favourite Bernard Herrmann scores from non-Hitchcock movies;

 

 

For me, Herrmann's style is so distinctive that I can pick it out when watching a certain show or movie.  I think he scored some of Ray Harryhausen's stuff, too.   And I'm pretty sure I've heard some 'Twilight Zone' music in 'The Fugitive'.

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All the scores by Herrmann are wonderful. I think my favorite is The Ghost and Mrs. Muir ( non-Hitchcock) for the same reasons Eugenia mentioned, so  haunting and poignant. I've read that it was Bernard Herrmann's favorite of all his scores.

 

No matter how many times I've seen Vertigo, it always gives me  goosebumps ( the music score and the film). Herrmann's scores always fit and captured the mood of the films perfectly.

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For me, Herrmann's style is so distinctive that I can pick it out when watching a certain show or movie.  I think he scored some of Ray Harryhausen's stuff, too.   And I'm pretty sure I've heard some 'Twilight Zone' music in 'The Fugitive'.

Herrmann is quite distinctive, I agree.  I can always pick out his compositions within a few notes.

 

All my favourite film composers share this quality.  For example, I know Henry Mancini compositions when I hear them, even if I don't see the credit lines.

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The Capitol Theater shows a Hitchcock in 35mm every year. Although I tired of Hitchcock about 20 years ago, seeing some on the big screen with an audience can make all the difference.

 

This year they're showing STRANGERS ON A TRAIN, one of my favorites due to Robert Walker's portrayal against type (his real voice!) and of course the carousel included in the fantastic climax.

 

I believe it's the carousel still operating at Griffith Park. (well, plus a well constructed, but badly proportioned model)

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Favorite British-produced Hitchcock films:

 

1.) "The Lodger" (1926)

 

2.) "The Lady Vanishes" (1938)

 

3.) "Young and Innocent (TCM title "The Girl Was Young") (1937)

 

4.) "Murder!" (1930)

 

5.) "Blackmail" (1929)

I picked top 5.  Sadly, I have been unable to watch The Lodger.  I have never found a copy of it.

 

Thanks for your list.

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It would be easier for me to list the films I don't like.  However, my top 10 favorite films, in no particular order, except for Number 1, are:

 

THE BIRDS

 

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT

DIAL M FOR MURDER

NORTH BY NORTHWEST

SABOTEUR

PSYCHO

SPELLBOUND

TORN CURTAIN

STRANGERS ON A TRAIN

SHADOW OF A DOUBT

 

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It would be easier for me to list the films I don't like.  However, my top 10 favorite films, in no particular order, except for Number 1, are:

 

THE BIRDS

 

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT

DIAL M FOR MURDER

NORTH BY NORTHWEST

SABOTEUR

PSYCHO

SPELLBOUND

TORN CURTAIN

STRANGERS ON A TRAIN

SHADOW OF A DOUBT

Hello John.

 

Yes, I find that it sometimes easier to list what you do not like when you like most of an artist.

 

Thanks for your list.

 

Torn Curtain is a bit dated because of the Iron Curtain, but it has  that unforgettable scene when Paul Newman kills a man with a knife, showing how difficult it is to kill someone with a knife and not be killed yourself.

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GregoryPeckfan--In the States, "The Lodger"  (1926) has multiple copies on YouTube; also, Vimeo.com used to have at least one good copy (I first saw TL on V)--hopefully you can find TL on one of these sites. :)

Yes, THE LODGER is in the public domain, so there are a lot of copies floating around. The only problem is that a lot of them are very poor quality, so if you find it and it looks terrible, that may just be that particular copy.

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GregoryPeckfan--In the States, "The Lodger"  (1926) has multiple copies on YouTube; also, Vimeo.com used to have at least one good copy (I first saw TL on V)--hopefully you can find TL on one of these sites. :)

I'll see if I'm allowed to watch it in Canada.  Thanks.

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THE LODGER (1927)

 

I just finished watching a copy of this on Youtube.

 

Is this soundtrack the only one available regardless of the quality of the print?

 

There were two songs -one near the beginning and another near the end - where there were modern day lyrics.  This was very distracting!

 

I am glad that I saw this movie, but I had to have some of it on mute.

 

Thanks for the help in seeing this version of The Lodger.  I appreciate it very much.

 

 

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GregoryPeckfan--About the soundtrack, No.  The versions of "The Lodger" (1926) I have seen were either totally silent or had an instrumental only score; the one I remember best was heavy on the pipe organ and piano.  The best restoration of TL I've seen was done by Lobster and The British Film Institute (BFI).

 

 

Edit: The version of TL I saw on "CiNENET"s YT channel is heavy on the violins (ala Psycho) and sound track uses a full orchestra (I Think).  Also, the character Daisy has a music-hall song near the end; that would account for 1900-1920 style lyrics.  If you were talking about a rock music soundtrack, I don't know of one.

 

Also, on the afore-mentioned channel--Hitchcock's other silents ("Downhill", "Easy Virtue" both 1927, and others) are available to watch.

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GregoryPeckfan--About the soundtrack, No.  The versions of "The Lodger" (1926) I have seen were either totally silent or had an instrumental only score; the one I remember best was heavy on the pipe organ and piano.  The best restoration of TL I've seen was done by Lobster and The British Film Institute (BFI).

 

 

Edit: The version of TL I saw on "CiNENET"s YT channel is heavy on the violins (ala Psycho) and sound track uses a full orchestra (I Think).  Also, the character Daisy has a music-hall song near the end; that would account for 1900-1920 style lyrics.  If you were talking about a rock music soundtrack, I don't know of one.

 

Also, on the afore-mentioned channel--Hitchcock's other silents ("Downhill", "Easy Virtue" both 1927, and others) are available to watch.

Nice to know there are other soundtracks.

 

Yes, the version on watched on YT was the one you mean and later era music -to this film, I mean - is the 1920s type.  But it always throws me off when lyrics are added to a silent that are inappropriate to the theme of the genre.

 

This is supposed to be a scary film - and it is when there aren't lyrics - not a romantic "date' movie where women have to drag their husband/boyfriend to see it.

 

I have read the source material.

 

I do enjoy the Laird Craiger version in 1944.

 

I'll check out the other Hitch silent I haven't seen yet.  Must be night, dark, etc. to watch online.

 

I was up really late last night because I had choir rehearsal and then watched The Lodger.

 

Many thanks again.

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FAVOURITE HITCHCOCK-INSPIRED AKA HITCHCOCKIAN MOVIES:

 

What are your favourite Hitchcockian movies that were actually NOT directed by Hitchcock but feel like they were?

 

 

Here are mine:

 

1. CHARADE - I watch this several times a year

2. ARABSQUE - I know it is not as good as Charade, but remember my moniker on this site

3. THE BRIDE WORE BLACK -seen only once so far, soundtrack by Bernard Herrmann

4. THE GAZEBO - we never see or hear him, but he is a character in the movie

5. DIABOLOQUE - Hitchcock tried to get the rights to this book to do the film

 

 

 

 

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HITCHCOCK AND DAVID O SELZNICK QUARTET OF FILMS:

 

It is well known about Selznick winning the award for Best Picture for Rebecca and that the two men did not get along and that Selznick's 'O' in his name and Hitch's opinion of the producer was the inspiration for the "O" in Cary Grant's name Roger O Thornhill in North By Northwest - monogram ROT.

 

When Eva Marie Saint asks Thornhill what the "O" stands for, Grant says "Nothing."

 

 

What do you think of the four movies these  men made together?

 

Alphabetically, they are;

 

NOTORIOUS

THE PARADINE CASE

REBECCA

SPELLBOUND

 

 

I am asking about the films themselves.

 

My personal preference  in regards to these movies are:

 

Notorious - love

Rebecca - love

Spellbound - love

The Paradine Case - not a big fan

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In order of preference:

 

1.) "Notorious"--Love this film; at once a  melodrama, cynical Post WW II noir, and love story, Hitchcock style.  Beautiful photography.

 

2.) "Rebecca"--An enjoyable watch, although Joan Fontaines' nameless heroine gets on my nerves: she's more than made up for by Judith Anderson as Mrs. Danvers.

 

3.) "The Paradine Case"--underrated Hitchcock, IMHO.  Marvelous camerawork and supporting performances by Ethel Barrymore & Charles Laughton.

 

4.) "Spellbound"--The psychiatry aspect hasn't aged well.  Salvador Dalis' dream sequence is the films' highlight.

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In order of preference:

 

1.) "Notorious"--Love this film; at once a  melodrama, cynical Post WW II noir, and love story, Hitchcock style.  Beautiful photography.

 

2.) "Rebecca"--An enjoyable watch, although Joan Fontaines' nameless heroine gets on my nerves: she's more than made up for by Judith Anderson as Mrs. Danvers.

 

3.) "The Paradine Case"--underrated Hitchcock, IMHO.  Marvelous camerawork and supporting performances by Ethel Barrymore & Charles Laughton.

 

4.) "Spellbound"--The psychiatry aspect hasn't aged well.  Salvador Dalis' dream sequence is the films' highlight.

Yes, psychiatry angles were very popular in a certain era and most of them make me cringe as I was a psychology major and people don't respect Freud the way the used to in the field.  I have problems with movies set in sanitariums unless they are a film noir or I am attracted to one of the actors - like with Spellbound.

 

Spellbound I love for the chemistry between the actors, and the fabulous dream sequence you mentioned.

 

Another sanitarium based movie I love - no relation to Hitch, of course - Harvey starring James Stewart as Elwood P. Dowd.

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FAVOURITE SUPPORTING ROLES IN HITCHCOCK MOVIES:

 

Inspired by a discussion in Bogie56's thread about favourite performances in 1930s movies during award season about Joan Crawford being thought of in Grand Hotel as either a leading actress or a supporting actress, I thought about supporting roles in Hitchcock movies that always have caught my attention.

 

 

I'll write about mine later.

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