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Something's been nagging me on this subject and I just remembered. Bernardo Bertolucci uses several Francis Bacon paintings in the opening titles of "Last Tango in Paris" (1972). And some of them are reinforced in the costumes and lighting throughout the movie. It was one of the most startling opening credits of any movie I had  seen baconbrandoup til then because I was not familiar with Bacon. Since then I have become a huge fan and have read a lot and visited museums with his paintings.

Here are two self-portraits compared with Brando in the film (sorry they came out above)titlessorry they came out above.

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These two sets of images mirror each other in the original paintings by Bacon from the opening credits and in the costumes and poses of Brando and Maria Schneider. 

This is one of my favorite uses of ART in the movies. 

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Image result for edward hoppers third avenue paintings

Image result for edward hopper painting 11am

 

 

I was watching "Force of Evil" 1948 with John Garfield and Thomas Gomez, and the black-and-white cinematography is stark, stunning and reminiscent of Edward Hopper. And then I read that the director Abraham Polonsky gave cinematographer George Barnes a book of Hopper's Third Avenue paintings. And so the inspiration is there. Above is Hopper's "Nighthawks" which is well-known to all art and classic movie fans. Followed by "New York Office."

Although the paintings are in color and the movie in black and white, the tone and shadow and light are very similar. There is a shot where Garfield runs through an empty Wall Street just at dawn. The streets are empty, the skyscrapers form canyons of steel and concrete, and he runs alone, by himself into the city that is engulfing him, literally and story-wise.

I highly recommend this movie for anyone who enjoys fine art influences in classic movies.

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33 minutes ago, marcar said:

I was watching "Force of Evil" 1948 with John Garfield and Thomas Gomez, and the black-and-white cinematography is stark, stunning and reminiscent of Edward Hopper. And then I read that the director Abraham Polonsky gave cinematographer George Barnes a book of Hopper's Third Avenue paintings. And so the inspiration is there. Above is Hopper's "Nighthawks" which is well-known to all art and classic movie fans. Followed by "New York Office."

Although the paintings are in color and the movie in black and white, the tone and shadow and light are very similar. There is a shot where Garfield runs through an empty Wall Street just at dawn. The streets are empty, the skyscrapers form canyons of steel and concrete, and he runs alone, by himself into the city that is engulfing him, literally and story-wise.

Here's an interior.

garfield.png

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Duffy (1968) is a largely forgotten (even by TCM) heist movie starring James Coburn and Susannah York.  Why it's so is beyond me, because it has everything that makes a heist movie great.  It has a tricky, picaresque plot, with engaging characters, exotic locations, including the coolest beach resort ever (a set, built for the movie!), humor, excitement, and a surprise ending where everyone gets what's coming to them, or what they deserve, and leaves you smiling.  But wait, there's more!  It has James Coburn at his coolest, and lankiest, Susannah York at her slinkiest and sylphiest; a super supporting cast including James Fox, John Alderton, and James Mason; the Mod scene of Sixties London, with a chic, sexy music score by Ernie Freeman; and a killer song sung by Lou Rawls! ("I'm Satisfied," which I don't know why is not a standard.)  

And there's even more than that! providing the pretext for this post.  It has absolutely the most incredible, amazing, fantastic, wild, crazy house in all the movies.  It's Duffy's place in Tangiers, which he has decorated with an irreverent, idiosyncratic collection of--well--sculptures.  They look to be almost entirely female nudes, in a style I can only describe as eclectic found-object.  Duffy calls it "Pop-porn."  Here are some examples (as always, I apologize for the poor image quality):

Man contemplating beast:

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Man makes a find:

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Or_gy in a Wardrobe ™:

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Duffy's balcony of earthly delights:

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I don't want to make this post too long, but Duffy's pad is best appreciated by watching the movie.  I've excerpted the arrival of the heist gang at his place:

 

And finally, Lou Rawls' song.  Here Duffy is arriving at the beach resort, unsuspecting of his imminent involvement in the scheme:

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Although George Romney himself appears only briefly in THAT HAMILTON WOMAN, his art has a huge impact on the story, for it's his portraits of Emma that lead Lord Hamilton to fall in love with her.

The last scene of the Lord is heartbreaking: he asks his manservant to straighten a painting only he can see, since it was lost at sea along with many other artworks he had collected.:(

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And speaking of art collecting, Rose Dewitt Bukater is not all that advanced in her taste. By 1912 Degas and Monet were already very well accepted, and while Pablo Ruiz Picasso still shocked quite a few, there was already universal agreement that he was someone worthy of attention.

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  • 1 month later...

I posted about the pic below from His Greatest Gamble (1934).  Wasn't I surprised to see it in Michel Marnet's art dealer's studio in Love Affair (1939) tonight.  The first bone fide case of art recycling I can recall.  I imagine other pics in the studio could be identified from other RKO features.

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971) is about my favorite Vincent Price movie.  It's got tons of style, a chic Art Deco theme in the set design, and a deftly balanced serio-comic tone.  Mr. Price and Virginia North lend just enough extravagance to their performances to lift the movie out of its lowish budget look.  The sets also contribute.  Phibes' lair is an Art Deco wonderland, mechanical band included:

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Joseph Cotten's Dr. Vesalius has a super modern vibe to his place:

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Nice door.  Never seems to be closed.  Eclectic collection.  You get a clear message the Doctor likes collecting, and knows what he likes.  Here's a good portrait:

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Can't tell if it was done for the movie.  Probably not.  But my guess this mural that drops down as a screen was:

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A scene right from a night club where society waters.  Elegance, grace, refinement.  I'd put that up on my walls.

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  • 1 month later...

A Month in the Country (1987) tells the story of an English art restorer, psychologically scarred by his service in World War I, sent as part of a government program to a rural church to uncover a medieval mural of the Last Judgement.  There he finds friends, platonic love, and healing.  It's not a monument of moviemaking, and it gets sentimental at times, but it's diverting.  And there's also the mural, painted by real-life artist Margot Noyes.  Although her work appears most influenced by impressionism, which was enjoying a resurgence during the 50s, the years of her art education, she does what looks to me a passable emulation of a mural from that period:

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Jesus on a rainbow is unusual, however.  It's usually a throne.  Here's more:

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The style, influenced by Byzantine art, seemingly crude, unadorned with later Renaissance refinements, is well suited to the stark church militant, with Jesus as the retributive monarch of Heaven.  But, some of the figures are really crude:

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This isn't a fault of the artist.  In the story, the muralist is discovered to have fallen to his death before finishing his work.

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  • 1 year later...

In Ex-Lady (1933) shown Wednesday Bette Davis, in various states of dishabille, portrays an artist wrangling with her lover/husband about how to handle love and marriage and the whole damn thing.  The importance/unimportance of marriage with regard to sex and human relations was a common theme explored in movies in the early thirties before the enforcement of the Production Code, primarily because it was a common theme in plays of the period, which the studios vacuumed up on account of their voracious appetite for material.  Though she is an artist in demand, we see almost none of her work.  But we do see a lot of that of an associate of hers.  A scene takes place in his apartment, where he mounts a show.  It's typical of the way collections of an artist were portrayed in movies of the time.  It's a jumble of all different styles and qualities, as if someone gave a requisition slip to a subordinate and told him to go grab 25 or thirty paintings from the warehouse:

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You don't get a good look at anything, and maybe you don't want to.  But there is one featured that looks good to me:

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The figure has reference to human anatomy, skeletal and muscular, but also has a boneless flexibility.  The pose creates a sinuous energy.  I'm racking my brain trying to think of whose style this is reminiscent of.  The lady viewing the painting is Claire Dodd.

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The Cremator (1969) - Kropkrinkl discusses his terrifying plans for "saving" (killing so that they reincarnate. This saves them in his demented world view) all of humanity against a backdrop of Breughel paintings. An absolutely beautiful film.

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 He is standing of the Right panel of Hieronymus Bosch's "Garden of Earthly Delights". There is also a montage of other Bosch paintings including; "Carrying of the Cross", "Ascent of the Blessed" & others.

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Thanks for your reference.  I see it's available for viewing on YouTube, with subtitles.  I wonder if you know of any movies featuring art created for that movie, as opposed to works by real artists?

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7 hours ago, slaytonf said:

Thanks for your reference.  I see it's available for viewing on YouTube, with subtitles.  I wonder if you know of any movies featuring art created for that movie, as opposed to works by real artists?

The murals in 3 Women (1977).

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Thanks for the heads up, cigarjoe.  It inspired a mini-odyssey about the movie, artist and more.  First, the movie and the murals.  I saw 3 Women (1977) a long time ago when it was available (without charge, of course) on YouTube.  I don't remember a lot about it, except it was a tour de force of performances by Shelly Duvall, Sissy Spacek, and Janice Rule.  And that, notwithstanding M*A*S*H (1970), it is his most subversive movie for it's attack on our understanding of identity and gender roles.  The murals, grotesque, chimeric, tortured, menacing, sexually perverse:

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Done by artist Bodhi Wind, they are the expression of Willie Hart's (Janice Rule) rage against the patriarchal culture of America and the accompanying psychic injury, confusion and horror inflicted on women.  That's just my guess.  

You can find out more about Mr. Wind by searching his name.  His other work is not so disturbing, seeming to be a combination of surrealist, abstract, and cubist elements.  Here is a good link:

https://rutheh.com/2013/04/29/the-extraordinary-art-of-bodhi-wind/

I also stumbled on this Wikipedia page listing artists who created work that appeared in movies.  It's not nearly comprehensive, but it's something:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_artists_who_created_paintings_and_drawings_for_use_in_films

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For some reason I had always considered you a person of refined and discriminating tastes.  You now confirm my intuition.  Age of Consent (1969) along with being a favorite movie of mine is also one with some of the best artwork created for it.  In fact it was one of the movies I referred to in my original post, lo these many pages ago.  So long, that the link to the only pic I could find for it has expired.  But never fear, I now have technology to get pics from DVDs I've made and will post some of 'em.  But first, I'll quote from myself about this movie that competes very strongly with The Red Shoes (1948) for my top Micheal Powell movie:

 Age of Consent, a movie directed by Michael Powell and starring James Mason as an artist who, feeling his wellsprings of creativity dried up, removes himself to a remote retreat, there encountering a young Hellen Mirren, who gets them going again.  Simultaneous with this process, we watch him progressively paint the interior of his hermit shack with playful, unaffected murals.  The art was done by Paul Delprat.  I couldn't find any pics of the shack walls, but there were some paintings-watercolors?-he did which can give you an idea of the mood he created:

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