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Water is Becoming More Precious by the Day


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I thought we were all going to be flooded out by global warming. Too bad they have to lie about everything like this, people don't believe any of it anymore. If anyone wants more proof just read the thread on global warming, there are dozens of lies exposed, and that is barely a blip of what they have tried to pass off as scientific evidence. This particular article sounds like it was written by vegans against the meat industry pretending to be fact.

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Indeed!

 

All over the world.....

We take it for granted, until we no longer have a safe supply of it.

 

In the mid west U.S. the Ogallala aquifer has been heavily tapped since the mid-1950's. It is essentially fossil water deposited after the last ice age, and most of the recharging playas have been destroyed by irresponsible farming practices.

Point is that much more water is being taken from it than is being replaced naturally, so it's only a matter of time.

 

The old ranchers had it right when they said that no "sod busters" should be allowed west of the 95th meridian.

Very hard to maintain an agricultural lifestyle if you can't consistently rely upon an annual average of at least 20 inches or more of rain. So that whole, vast strip, from Canada to the gulf, was/is semi-arid land, generally unsuitable for dry (non irrigation) farming.

There have been wet cycles of course, but these are generally not the norm.

It was during such a "wet" cycle that railroads, combined with a high demand for wheat, induced large numbers of farmers into the area.

Poor farming practices depleted the soil. When the price of wheat went down, farmers plowed up more land... Then came the "drought" or "return to norm," that the old timers warned about. With the vital top soil grasses removed, it didn't take long for much of the land to dry up and begin to blow away. Enter the man made "Dust Bowl" of the 1930s.

Were it not for the Army of engineers in those days, we'd now be talking about the Great American Desert, instead of the Great Plains "bread basket" that helps feed the world.

Because nature cannot be depended upon, enter the deep water wells that tapped into the vast Ogallala aquifer.

In just a brief 65 years since wet (irrigation) farming was introduced on a vast scale, the great reliance upon water in the mid west has stopped the natural flow of rivers, and drained the massive aquifer into a mere shadow of its former self.

At the current rate of consumption, some generous estimates place the life of the Ogallala aquifer at maybe 50 more years, other more conservative estimates say 25 years. But no one says that it will be around indefinitely.

 

Still cities, and townships encourage ever more growth into the area, placing ever greater demand.

Agriculture and Industry draws ever more water, further accelerating the decline.

When the water is finally gone, there will be a mass human exodus from that part of the mid west.

Agriculture and industry won't stay without water, so jobs will go away. And without jobs and water, most people in those areas will move elsewhere. Emigrating elsewhere will place a strain on those areas as well.

Towns, cities, and counties will go bankrupt. Locally vested pensions will be renegged.

The writing has long been on the wall, but government and people refuse to read and believe it. 

What's worse is when the price of oil spikes high, fracking threatens to contaminate what water is left.

 

We are all a party to this.

I am learning to be ever more conscious as to how many gallons of water it takes to produce a mouthful of almonds. And how many more gallons it takes to grow one ounce of beefsteak.

 

People seem to forget (or never learned) that the Sahara was once a lush and verdant garden. That fishing fleets once plied the Aral Sea. That Mono Lake was once a desert oasis with potable water. That the Colorado River once emptied into the Gulf of California, producing vital wetlands along the way ... ... .... ....

 

Many Americans are good at chiding the impoverished citizenry in poorer countries of the world, by saying "what kind of idiot would try to live in a desert anyway."

And thereby reveal the ignorance that our transient and too often environmentally damaging technologies have allowed us to do just that.... Without energy devouring AC how many would live in Phoenix? Without Hoover Dam, how many would live in Las Vegas?   Without the Ogallala aquifer how many would live west of the 95th meridian in the mid west?

The list goes on, and on.... 

We are so myopic that we take all these things for granted, then will be surprised when the day of reckoning ultimately comes upon us.

But one thing is undeniably certain... without clean air to breathe, clean water to drink, and food, no human or large brained animal life is sustainable on earth.

 

Responsible ranchers and more and more family farmers are becoming ever more aware of the limits of their land.

There is a limit to what is sustainable on earth. And unlimited human growth and unrestrained consumption does not support sustainability.

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People who settles in inhospitable areas such as the desert southwest think they can conquer and subdue nature to do his bidding "making the desert bloom" are idiots. Irrigating from aquifers can only work for so long, the resource should have been used for drinking water only.  

 

 

Oh guess what the craziest "man conquers nature" idea yet to date?  Geeze how about terraforming the Earth FIRST i.e. the Sahara. :blink:

 

(which can't be done)

 

800px-MarsTransitionV.jpg

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Mother Earth does make fresh water scarce in different areas at different times, but as long as we have oceans we will be able to create fresh water for drinking. Either heat salt water and collect it's condensation (much like a still), or freeze it - the ice formed is all fresh water which can be melted and consumed immediately without further processing.

 

Should it come to the above, of course it's price will increase. But there will still be plenty to go around.

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Should it come to the above, of course it's price will increase. But there will still be plenty to go around.

 

Like any other "fossil fuel" clean, fresh water is a limited supply. 

The only good thing about using so much water for agriculture is that at least it goes back to the earth filtered by the soil. (or contaminated by the soil if chemicals are used)

 

This is why fracking is such a horrific idea-soon water will be the most precious fossil fuel. And people need it for DRINKING.

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Should it come to the above, of course it's price will increase. But there will still be plenty to go around.

 

Like any other "fossil fuel" clean, fresh water is a limited supply. 

The only good thing about using so much water for agriculture is that at least it goes back to the earth filtered by the soil. (or contaminated by the soil if chemicals are used)

 

This is why fracking is such a horrific idea-soon water will be the most precious fossil fuel. And people need it for DRINKING.

 

We can live without oil. We can't live without water.

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