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Trivia Quiz for Beginners


FredCDobbs

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Judith, you've got it!

 

FOUL PLAY (1978) is correct!

 

To recap: "Twosomes" is the name of the cocktail bar where Gloria Mundy (Goldie Hawn) picks up Stanley Tibbetts (the hilarious Dudley Moore). And the number 121TCE is the license plate of the limousine registered to the Archbishop of San Francisco. It is such a big clue to the unraveling of the murder mystery, I was sure some of you would guess the answer right away.

 

Pope Pius XIII, played by Cyril Magnin (who made only one other film before he died), is the key character in the mystery, though he never says a word.

 

Nice catch, Judith... Your turn now!

 

Dan N.

 

http://dan-navarros-blog.blogspot.com

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> "What did Oliver Hardy and Audie Murphy have in

> common?"

>

>

> Oliver Hardy and Audie Murphy were both Freemasons.

>

> Dan N.

 

Some creative answers below which are techincally not wrong, but the one above is answer I was looking for. You guys are so silly.

You're up, Dan.

JDB

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OH, I know! I know! It's that wonderful scene from History is Made at Night, wherein Charles Boyer shows Jean Arthur how he can turn his hand into a puppet! Advised by Senor Wences, who would later show and voice a similar character, called "Johnny," on the Ed Sullivan Show.

 

That is the sweetest moment.

 

Right?

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Whence this quote?

 

All my laurels you have riven away... and my roses; yet in spite of you there is one crown I bear away with me. And tonight, when I enter before God, my salute shall sweep away all the stars from the blue threshold! One thing without stain, unspotted from the world in spite of doom mine own... and that is... my white plume.

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Ayres... Thanks for the kind words. But you know, when I saw that question of yours go up on the screen, my eyes just about leaped out of my head. See, I studied Rostand's "Cyrano de Bergerac" in high school and I knew that quote by heart!

 

Well, anyway, it saved me a lot of research.

 

I'll think up another question soon.

 

Dan N.

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Okay, here's one that might challenge our trivia experts.

 

This is an actor born to a wealthy South American family who debuted in Hollywood during the mid-1920s (silent films) but whose career, which never quite attained "stardom" as we like to think of it, nevertheless spanned a quarter-century into sound movies. In one of his last roles he reprised a bit he had done in an earlier classic film, some 25 years before.

 

He had shed his baptismal name for a typical Hollywood anglo monicker. Handsome, with some histrionic talent, our man was also an accomplished ballroom dancer. Definitely hispanic, this fellow looked absolutely "gringo" throughout his career, therefore befitting his anglo professional name.

 

He made English and Spanish language films, though possessed of a thick Spanish accent and, in fact, was featured in a Hispanic remake of a classic English horror film.

 

Who is he?

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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Nope.

 

Gilbert Roland was born in Juarez, Mexico... not in South America, as was the person in question. Also, it's true that GR adopted an "Anglo" name for the movies -- first name in honor of John Gilbert, last name in honor of Ruth Roland -- but if you read the clues, you will note that our mystery person "looked Anglo" all through his film career. GR, on the other hand, was always hispanic-looking.

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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