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Trivia Quiz for Beginners


FredCDobbs

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> would it have to do with an oscar ? wild guess

 

No, that's not it.

 

Hint: If you find what the two ladies have in common, it can lead you to Karloff as well, but you may have to dig a little deeper to get there.

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Just came across this one: Here goes:

 

Irene Dunne played Anna Leonowens in "Anna and the King of Siam" in 1946.

Deborah Kerr played Anna Leonowens in "The King and I" in 1956.

Boris Karloff is the great nephew of the real Anna Leonowens.

So I guess the common thread is Anna Leonowens.

 

I love this stuff!

 

Best,

Philip

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> Just came across this one: Here goes:

>

> Irene Dunne played Anna Leonowens in "Anna and the

> King of Siam" in 1946.

> Deborah Kerr played Anna Leonowens in "The King and

> I" in 1956.

> Boris Karloff is the great nephew of the real Anna

> Leonowens.

> So I guess the common thread is Anna Leonowens.

>

> I love this stuff!

>

> Best,

> Philip

 

Excellent!! You are right. You are up, if you'd like.

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They all made their film debuts in a Joan Crawford movie. Fred Astaire debuted in Dancing Lady 1933, Joan Fontaine aka Joan Burfield in No More Ladies, 1935 and Mike (Touch) Connors in Sudden Fear, 1952. Do I win the grand prize!!!!

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  • 3 weeks later...

"Wedding Crashers?"

 

 

Nope, not "Wedding Crashers."

 

The issue of the license plate -- AIW610 -- is curious to me, because I don't know what, if anything, it signifies. Hear me out. On the IMDb page for the film in question, we see detailed explanations of WHY certain other plate numbers were used in the movie... but there's no mention of this one. And yet, the plate number is shown sharp and clear in the foreground, as if we are EXPECTED to take notice of it.

 

If any of you Sherlocks come up with the correct answer, I wish you'd explain to me the significance of AIW610. Because, knowing a litle something about this film maker's work, I'm sure it was not simply an accidental bunch of numbers.

 

Cheers,

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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So, Dan, I googled this number, and I get hits for Frank Miller's "Sin City."

 

Since I know nothing about Frank Miller, this movie, or graphic novels in general, that's as far as I got. Is this the one? It so, why are license plates significant? Events in Miller's life? Tributes to friends? Astrology? Numerology? Lotto numbers?

 

I just hate it when things like this crop up, 'cause then I can't stop until I find an answer. Guess I'm just the sad product of a traditional education. Most kids these days wouldn't give a damn if finding the answer required the slightest effort.

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Yeah, I googled it too, and got the same clueless replies.

 

The movie in question is, indeed, "Sin City" (2005). But what is the significance of AIW610?

 

Please note, in the Trivia section of the "Sin City" page on IMDb, we read that both Jessica Alba and Jaime King drive cars with the license plate LEV311. Then we are told that this is in reference to Lynn E. Varley, whose birthday is March 11.

 

Also, we read that the car driven by The Yellow Bastard (Nick Stahl) bears the license plate TYB069... the first three letters, of course, indicating the character's "name."

 

But when Clive Owen jumps into his red Cadillac convertible to chase down the bad guys, we are treated to a nice, clear view of the front license plate, and it reads: AIW610. What does it mean? We're still wondering.

 

You're up at bat, Judith.

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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I don't think I'm going to get very far in this AIW610 thing. I looked on several websites devoted to Sin City, the graphic novel and the film, and gosh, they just go on and on, don't they? I don't have the time or the inclination to steep myself in Basin City lore. There probably are many people who thrive on such things, but in this case I'm not one

 

A general look-up gave me the fact that AIW has something to do with wrestling, and that A1W (the numeral "1") is a prototype nuclear reactor used by the Navy. Not wanting to get too far into the Navy's business through my computer, I didn't pursue that avenue. Anyway, all this probably has nothing to do with the matter at hand. I didn't see anything in the reams and reams of Sin City and Dwight McCarthy sites I skimmed that mentioned those initials, or that number, or their equivalents.

 

It may very well be something really simple, as such things tend to be, like the production company for X Files being "TenThirteen," which is Chris Carter's birthday. This one may be too trivial even for me to want to follow up on.

 

Sorry, Dan.

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Apparently it isn't about wrestling, or nuclear reactors. My poking around has discovered that there is an electronic device, produced by ATI Technologies, called an "All-in-Wonder." Just trying to read up on it gives me a headache, but apparently the AIW X1900 is the latest wrinkle in media devices. I'm guessing that the All-in-Wonder 610 was an earlier version.

 

Robert Rodriguez, who directed "Sin City" (2005), is an electronics maven. He created the film using actors performing in front of a green screen, then created a world of backgrounds electronically. I have no doubt the All-in-Wonder is one of his toys.

 

Dan N.

 

http://dan-navarros-blog.blogspot.com

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"Sin City" was on over the weekend on one of my cable channels. I watched a bit of it. It's not really something I think I could get into - it was very interesting, visually, of course, but all the frantic, violent, overblown plot points -- just too much for linear little me.

 

So very much hitting and maiming and limb-twisting. A guy thing, I guess. I'd actually like to try to get through it again, just for the technical stuff - that was pretty amazing to look at. I've never seen the written version. Does it live up to that?

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"Sin City" was on over the weekend on one of my cable channels. I watched a bit of it. It's not really something I think I could get into - it was very interesting, visually, of course, but all the frantic, violent, overblown plot points -- just too much for linear little me.

 

So very much hitting and maiming and limb-twisting. A guy thing, I guess. I'd actually like to try to get through it again, just for the technical stuff - that was pretty amazing to look at.

 

 

I've had this same debate with my wife. She's appalled at all the violence and bloodletting in SIN CITY (2005), and refuses to watch it with me. But I respond by saying:

 

Hey honey, I wouldn't watch it either... if it was all gore. But it isn't gore, it's a... COMIC STRIP!!!

 

Robert Rodriguez created this film based on the "graphic novels" by Frank Miller. I've seen the "graphic novels" -- they're just comic books, Judith... and believe me, they do not mirror real life. Just as the movie does not mirror real life. It's all a big joke. Gory, yes, but a joke.

 

In fact, here's a stat that will give you pause: Although SIN CITY is rated "R" for lots of violence and some female nudity, how many of you know that there is NOT ONE USE in this film, of the "f" word or any form of it! In fact, the "sh" word is used only once, by Michael Clarke Duncan, and I have a feeling that was an ad-lib.

 

Really! A violent, sexy movie that is out of bounds to unescorted youngsters, and yet makes NO USE of the "f" word. Gotta be a first.

 

I'm such a big fan of the movie now, I can't wait until the sequel comes out. When it does, and if I like what I read from the movie critics, I will not wait for cable, I will go see this one in the theater.

 

Dan N.

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Hello, fellow Trivians. A really nasty virus has been going around NYC and my household, and I've been out of commission for almost a week, first as a caregiver, and then as a victim. Nice to be back among the living.

 

Here's a question:

 

A popular character actor whose career spanned 50 years in film and television attributed his menacing looks, in part, to an incident which occurred during a group activity in childhood. Who is the actor, and what was the incident?

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