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Trivia Quiz for Beginners


FredCDobbs

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yes dan, it is frankie darrow!

 

he played a jockey innumerable times. he worked with 'wild' Bill

Wellman. he flipped (usually as a little old lady) on the Red Skelton

show. he played Robert Young as a youngster in 'tugboat annie'.

frequently he was just called frankie in many roles. my post about

'forbidden planet' didn't feel right. i went back and checked some old

magazines and i believe frankie played robbie the robot in the invisible

boy, not in that big space opera. i hope that didn't lead anyone astray.

i believe you're up dan. and boy, it's just as hard doing the questioning.

 

norbell

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I'm bumping this question, because I have a hunch the reason no one has replied is that you all think it's some kind of sick joke.

 

No, it's NOT a joke. I'll repeat my earlier post:

 

Name the movie in which Tarzan's wife sits on an egg.

 

This is an honest, real, genuine, (here, add your own synonym for actual) movie-related trivia question. Any takers?

 

Cheers,

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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> No, it's NOT a joke. I'll repeat my earlier post:

>

> Name the movie in which Tarzan's wife sits on an

> egg.

>

> This is an honest, real, genuine, (here, add your own

> synonym for actual) movie-related trivia question.

> Any takers?

 

How about "Tarzan Finds a Son?" I recall there's something in it about cooking eggs (ostrich eggs, maybe?)

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How about "Tarzan Finds a Son?" I recall there's something in it about cooking eggs (ostrich eggs, maybe?)

 

 

No, not that one.

 

As an additional clue, let me say that my question is posted in the same spirit as the previous question, posted by norbell to this thread. Remember that one? It read:

 

i jockeyed for many roles and worked with 'wild' Bill

before i flipped on seeing Red.

 

In other words, it's whimsical. Use your imagination when tackling my question. If you do, you'll find the answer much quicker than if you stick to pedestrian logic.

 

To repeat:

 

Name the movie in which Tarzan's wife sits on an egg.

 

Cheers,

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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Name the movie where "Tarzan's" wife sits on an egg.

 

 

Well, this question has been up for a week, and not many responded to it. I warned you, it was asked in a spirit of whimsy.

 

The correct answer is: HOLLYWOOD PARTY (1934).

 

If you recall, the great comedians Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy often used Jimmy Finlayson, that irascible Scotsman, as foil for their shenanigans. He would launch a small "war" against the boys, they would fight back in their comical way, and the whole world would laugh.

 

In "Hollywood Party" (1934), Laurel and Hardy were in the cast, but not Finlayson. So, in a scene at the party, the boys get into a bickering contest with Lupe Velez, that fiery enchilada from Mexico. She snaps at them, they snap back, and the battle continues until Laurel takes a fresh egg and deftly slips it onto the chair Lupe is about to sit in. When she finishes her verbal tirade of the moment, she relaxes into the chair, and... SQUISH!!

 

At that time, Lupe Velez was married to... Class???

 

That's right, Class: Johnny Weissmuller, aka "Tarzan!"

 

Cheers,

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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Can you name the non-English language film that is sexy, romantic, satiric, and filled with comic virtuosity... and yet, whoever tried to translate its original title to English did a deplorable job? The English title appears to convey the OPPOSITE of what its original title meant to say.

 

I know, that isn't much to go on. So let me add: It's a love story about two of society's misfits that end up happy together.

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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Can you name the non-English language film that is sexy, romantic, satiric, and filled with comic virtuosity... and yet, whoever tried to translate its original title to English did a deplorable job? The English title appears to convey the OPPOSITE of what its original title meant to say.

 

I know, that isn't much to go on. So let me add: It's a love story about two of society's misfits that end up happy together.

 

 

Another hint: The film in question was directed by Pedro Almodovar.

 

Dan N.

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Carne Tremula?

 

 

I'm not familiar with "Carne Tremula" (1997), and the IMDb does not list an English title for this film. Do you know what it is?

 

Because the point behind my question was that the person/s who translated the foreign-language film title to English did a very bad job of it.

 

Dan N.

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Probably not what you're thinking of, Dan, but it's just my personal beef that I've never been happy with "The Birdcage" as a translation of "La Cage Aux Folles." A more literal translation of the name of the cabaret in the French film would be "The Cage of the Madwomen" (which I think of as "Women's Loony Bin"). I've seen the French film referred to with the English title "Birds of a Feather," which I like better. Just an aside.

 

Please resume deliberations. (Is your question about a French film?)

 

Oops - I didn't read down to the end of your post saying it's a Spanish film. Je m'excuse.

 

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jdb1

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hi dan,

this is a good one,

most of his movies deal with social misfits, but the one i am thinking of is

"atame"

which in english is supposed to be "tie-me-up,tie-me-down"

and although i have never been able to figure out what atame means, i always thought it was "love"

it just looks similar to the french version of "love" which i believe is "ataime"

well now that i have broken down my theory.....

wow long post :)

karith

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Karith... you are RIGHT!!!

 

Thanks for giving me a chance to air my frustrations over the inept translation given to this title.

 

"Atame," in Spanish, literally means "Tie me."

 

If you've seen the movie, you know what that means. The Antonio Banderas character abducts his loved one -- played by Victoria Abril -- and holds her hostage in an apartment next to her own. But he means her no harm. On the contrary, he is in love with her, and is trying to get her to love him.

 

At first she resists. When he has to leave the apartment to go to the drug store, he ties her to the bed so that she can't escape. Later, after the two have truly fallen in love, he has to leave again. "Will you stay, or will I have to tie you down again?" he asks. Victoria, now in love but unsure if she can resist the temptation to flee, says to him: "Atame." Tie me. It is one of the most beautiful moments in this disturbing yet poignant film.

 

But somebody tried to translate the title "Atame" to English, and came up with the hideous "Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!" To my knowledge, that phrase has to do with S & M, not real love. It is a real downer, and not in the least evocative of the film's beautiful message.

 

Your turn, karith.

 

Dan N.

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