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Trivia Quiz for Beginners


FredCDobbs

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>

> But somebody tried to translate the title "Atame" to

> English, and came up with the hideous "Tie Me Up!

> Tie Me Down!" To my knowledge, that phrase has to

> do with S & M, not real love. It is a real downer,

> and not in the least evocative of the film's

> beautiful message.

>

> Your turn, karith.

>

> Dan N.

 

Dan, I agree that the English title is not the greatest. It sounds like one of those 1960s comedies which tried to be so clever, using exclamation points in the title. However, I guess I don't have S&M on the brain, because that title brings to my mind the idea of commmitment phobia. But that wouldn't have drawn in much of an audience, would it?

 

OK, karith, tie us up with a brain teaser!

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Carne Tremula is translated Live Flesh and is also about

social misfits finding acceptance but might be more accurately translated

as Trembling Flesh, but Atame! (Tie Me Up, Tie Me Down)is the more obvious choice with the less than desirable translation.

 

Thanks for the great questions! :)

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hmmmm

well i thought this was easy.

 

this movie is noted to be "culturally significant" due to the fact it features a women to women kiss.

 

karith

 

 

karith... Can you clarify if this is supposed to be the FIRST fem-fem kiss ever, in the movies? Because I think I've seen f/f kisses in silent films.

 

I know that in the early talkie THE OFFICE WIFE (1930), Dorothy Mackaill and Joan Blondell share a quick kiss on the lips, but it's no big deal. They are playing sisters. Is that the one you mean?

 

Dan N.

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this movie is noted to be "culturally significant" due to the fact it features a women to women kiss.

 

 

Just thought of another one. In the 1926 comedy, Laura LaPlante plays a double role... and one of the most famous scenes is where the two women come together and share a kiss on the lips.

 

Of course it is Laura kissing herself, in double exposure. Is THIS what you mean by "culturally significant?"

 

Dan N.

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Can you name the musical film in which the leading man originated his role on Broadway, and which was co-directed by two men who also took supporting roles in the film?

 

 

Here's another clue:

 

The film in question introduced to the movie-going public a man who would become famous as a raconteur and, eventually, a talk show host.

 

Name the film.

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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I'm gonna bump this question, 'cause it's too good to die on the vine:

 

Name this movie... and I've given you three (3) good clues:

 

1. It's a musical film.

2. It was co-directed, and its two directors took supporting roles in the film.

3. It introduced to the public a future famous raconteur and talk show host.

 

If you want more clues than that, you'll have to chance a guess.

 

Okay?

 

Dan N.

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So This Is Love - Merv Griffin?

 

 

Nope, not "So This is Love" (1953). That would have been a good answer if it had been co-directed... but it wasn't. Gordon Douglas directed it alone. AND... he was not a supporting actor in the cast.

 

BTW: Did you know that Merv Griffin always claimed that, in that picture, he and Kathryn Grayson shared the FIRST open-mouth kiss, in movie history? I've watched the movie since I heard him say that, and darned if it doesn't look like he's right.

 

Back to business: I said I'd provide more clues. Okay, here goes.

 

The movie in question stars the same actor who originated the role on Broadway... but NOT the same ACTRESS. And that seems strange, because the actress in the stage version was the very capable and very talented Barbara Stanwyck.

 

Okay... what's the title of the movie?

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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> I'm gonna bump this question, 'cause it's too good to

> die on the vine:

>

> Name this movie... and I've given you three (3) good

> clues:

>

 

1. It's a musical film.

 

"The Dance of Life"

 

> 2. It was co-directed, and its two directors took

> supporting roles in the film.

 

John Cromwell

A. Edward Sutherland

 

> 3. It introduced to the public a future famous

> raconteur and talk show host.

 

Oscar Levant

 

And Hal Skelly was the actor who appeared in both the stage version ("Burlesque") as well as the film.

 

This was a great question, Dan! If you hadn't given the Barbara Stanwyck clue I'd never have gotten it. :)

 

Di

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"The Dance of Life"

 

> 2. It was co-directed, and its two directors took

> supporting roles in the film.

 

John Cromwell

A. Edward Sutherland

 

And Hal Skelly was the actor who appeared in both the stage version ("Burlesque") as well as the film.

 

 

RIGHT!!! "The Dance of Life" it is!

 

You're up at bat now, Di.

 

Dan N.

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Oh, dear! I didn't mean for you to wait for me. My ability to access the net is sporadic at best and would make it difficult if not impossible for me to provide anything remotely challenging as far as trivia goes. If that means I should stop guessing, I will and no hard feelings. :)

 

So...anyone else who has some trivia please feel free to take my turn.

 

Di

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Um, uh, SueSue...

 

I don't mean to be presumptuous, but you may have confused this board with "Classic Film 21 Questions."

 

On THAT board, it is kosher to plant clues, one phrase at a time. But on this board, we usually begin by asking a complete question to start things off.

 

If anyone here thinks I'm out of line, by all means let me know. But a look at PREVIOUS questions posted to THIS board will show what I mean. All the questions are complete at the inception, not cryptic blips like

 

Hint: Snipped Stockings

 

Dan N.

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