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Trivia Quiz for Beginners


FredCDobbs
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No!

One of the greatest lines (and truths) ever said in a movie:

 

That's the loveliest ring you ever bought me. Now that I have this, you needn't buy me any more rings.

Well, if you don't want anymore . . .

What I'd really like now is a nice diamond necklace.

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By the way, I love "Stalog 17"!! Are we going to finish mine now??

 

Recap:

1. In what movie did this ?Dame? fall for man who tried to ?poison? his mother?

2. A church pew and a "bendable" tree!

3. Red dye.

4. "eee gads"

5." That's the loveliest ring you ever bought me. Now that I have this, you needn't buy me any more rings.

Well, if you don't want anymore . . .

What I'd really like now is a nice diamond necklace. "

 

Tonight's clue:

We should be "dunne" with this by now!!

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I'm afraid that I'm no fan of Mel Brooksian schtick. The reason brings to mind an incident that occurred at The New Yorker magazine decades ago: a cartoon showing a man in a shower stall, with the water six feet deep and fish swimming around the him, was submitted and rejected by the editor (I can't remember whether it was William Shawn or Harold Ross).

 

The editor explained that he rejected it -- funny though it was -- because the situation depicted in the cartoon simply could not happen in real life, and that the magazine's humor was all about the real vicissitudes that real New Yorkers experience.

 

It's the same with Brooks's films: the gags don't arise from character, but merely from Brooks's need to have a joke at a particular point in the story. Consequently, all the characters in the movie know they're in a movie; they wink at the audience (something that did work in the Hope-Crosby ROAD pictures, but not here) and play to the camera.

 

Contrast that with Preston Sturges's films, or Billy Wilder's, or Lubitsch's (compare, say, Brooks's ROBIN HOOD: MEN IN TIGHTS with THE COURT JESTER, two films that share a milieu, and a basic common goal. The former film is, well, dreck, whereas the the latter is exquisite because, however wacky things get in JESTER, the gags come from character).

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