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How about Audi Murphy?


inglis
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I have not seen alot of stuff on the boards about Audi Murphy is there any body out here who knows alot about his movies and any info about him and his career?I have seen a few of his westerns and the war movies,in fact I don't know if he did alot of war movies .I know of To Hell And Back.I don't know the names of the westerns he did but I have seen them,any input here ?

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Audie Murphy was probably a little better known for his war films, but he certainly made a lot of westerns. He was still making them in the late 1960's. He played Jesse James in his final movie A Time For Dying just two years before the plane crash that killed him. His best known western was probably The Unforgiven which starred Burt Lancaster, Audrey Hepburn, John Saxon, Lillian Gish and Doug McClure.

 

There's a website devoted to Audie Murphy:

 

http://www.audiemurphy.com/samc.htm

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Hi Mr.Burley .I did not know that he died in a plane crash .That is news to me .I had heard that he also suffered from depression any news on that? Alot of depression seems to enter the stars lives back then .I would think or imagine that the pressures of stardom are about the same as the are now perhaps

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Because of the horrors of war that Mr. Murphy witnessed, he suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder. Back then it was known as "shell shock". It made him a little "crazy". He reportedly had bouts of violent behavior, depression and drug dependency. He became an advocate for veterans with similar ailments and lobbied the government to extend benefits for PTSD.

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Audie Murphy has always been a favorite of mine, mainly because I love Westerns. The majority of his films were made at Universal, and practically all of them were Westerns. Usually he played the good guy. One exception was when he played James Stewart's brother in "Night Passage." Consequently, his character was much more interesting. And a lot of future stars have played bit parts in some of his movies, such as Rock Hudson and Tony Curtis.

 

One bit of gossip is that he apparently was not such a nice guy in real life. He had a brief marriage to Wanda Hendrix and it was rumored that she suffered much physical abuse from him. I hope that's not true, since he was a hero to so many.

 

I also liked "No Name on the Bullet" because it was an interesting take on a story. He was a famed gunfighter who had recently come into this town, and all the locals assumed he had come there to kill one of them. In the course of the story, all kinds of secrets come out. Another movie where he wasn't the typical hero.

 

Terrence.

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The thing I find interesting about Murphy is when you find out about him you might think - "That guy did all that?" That sense of small modest looking type played well against how tough his characters could be.

 

It's odd that he might not have been such a nice guy in real life because he seemed nothing but one on the screen.

 

Visited his grave at Arlington years ago. The closest I've ever been to a movie star.

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I thought the same thing about Audie Murphy. He sure didn't look like a hero - whatever you imagine, in your mind, a hero would look like. But I found the same thing by looking at a number of other 'real life heroes'. You just can't judge a book by it's cover, I've found.

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That's very true. I read To Hell and Back long before I realized there was a movie about it, starring Audie Murphy himself, and was so surprised when I finally saw the actor who was the war hero.

 

Another actor worth noting, one that played mostly loveable, dim-witted lugs in B movies, is Wayne Morris. He went on to become a highly decorated flying ace during World War II, which I found out recently on TCM before watching Task Force, and I gained a whole new respect for him.

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I just learned something interesting about Audie Murphy this morning on AMC. His gravesite is the most frequently visited of any American except for John F. Kennedy. I guess he really is a hero after all!

 

Terrence.

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Not surprising for the most highly decorated soldier of WWII. He was famous long before he became an actor.

 

I used to like him when I was a kid, but I thought he had a very un-heroic speaking voice, which detracted from his he-man stature. Also he always seemed to be shorter than everyone around him, and the film makers didn't seem to do much to compensate for that, as they often did for other actors. But one thing about Murphy was that he got better as he went along, and not all celebrities-turned-actors can say that. Actually, I like him better now than I did then, so maybe I've matured some as well.

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I guess I didn't express myself well. I never doubted that he was a true American hero. I also believe that he improved as he got more experience in front of the camera. Most of his Westerns are very entertaining. As far as his height, it was rather obvious that he wasn't very tall, but that did not seem to make much difference. And he had a soft Texas drawl that I have always found very appealing.

 

Terrence.

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I guess that's the thing. As a child my experience of cowboy heroes was of the tall, sonorous-voiced he-man. Also, as a Brooklynite, I wasn't used to soft Texas drawls, so I didn't see Murphy as very heroic. I thought you had to yell to be brave. However, I've learned better now, and I do enjoy his low key presence in his films. And I thought he was especially good in Red Badge of Courage and No Name on the Bullet.

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  • 2 months later...

Audie Murphy was my father's hero. My father fought in many of the same battles as did Audie Murphy during WWII. Said he never met him but heard quite a bit about him during the war.

 

To my shame, I suspected much of "To Hell and Back" was a lot of Hollywood hype. Then I read the actual military commendations on the Audie Murphy site. That movie wasn't long enough to reflect all that did happen.

 

The closest I came to meeting Audie Murphy was in meeting one of his horses. He had a beautiful sorrel mare in the stall next to our mare. Never had much use for sorrels but this one got my attention because she was so perfectly built. Found out a couple of days later that she belonged to Audie Murphy.

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  • 5 months later...

Audie Murphy westerns are probably my most favorite of all. They always had a good story, and he always managed to have some pretty big name co-stars in them. He actually did three war movies - "The Red Badge of Courage", "To Hell and Back" and "Battle at Bloody Beach", which was made in 1961 and co-starred Gary Crosby.

 

Some of his early westerns were my most favorite -

 

The Cimarron Kid

The Kid From Texas

Destry

Duel at Silver Creek

Drums Across The River

Tumbleweed

Night Passage

Ride Clear of Diablo

Seven Ways From Sundown

Hellbent For Leather

No Name on the Bullet

Gunsmoke

Ride A Crooked Trail

Kansas Raiders

 

Just to name a few. Rarely do they get shown on TCM anymore. I wish they would have a Saturday tribute to Audie Murphy and the best of his Universal Westerns instead of the same stuff, and show them all in their original aspect ratio.

 

Recenty they showed "The Quiet American" a rare Audie Murphy movie which was not a western.

 

The best of Murphy's movies came while he was with Universal, later he went to Columbia Pictures where he had movies like "The Quick Gun", "Guns of Fort Petticoat" and "The Texican" to name a few.

 

You can tell that I am truly an Audie Murphy fan, and I collect all of his movies.

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One Audie Murphy western that I particularly enjoy is THE TEXICAN from 1966. It turns up fairly often in the Western Channel rotation, unfortunately in a "pan and scan" version. It's pretty violent and actionful and features Broderick Crawford as the heavy. It was shot in Mexico and has the feeling of a "spaghetti" western. It was released domestically by Columbia Pictures, which means it might show up on TCM some day. Highly recommended.

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