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JackBurley

Silver Screen's Operatunities

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Jack, I do so love your little bits of trivia, altho sometimes they're over my head. I thought Jane Powell's interview was touching, did you watch, or has it been on before? However, how can someone be so big and not know it?

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TCM is magical. Somehow they seem to know the movies I'd most like to see and play them between 1am and 8am. The magic continues. On this Jane Powell day, the features I'd most like to see are Three Daring Daughters, A Date With Judy, Athena and the "Private Screenings". Yup: 3am, 5am, 1:15am and 7am. Sigh.

 

Anyway, I mustered the strength to get out of bed at 7:20 this morning, inspired by the notion that Miss Powell was chatting with Mr. Osborn. So I only caught the last half; and I enjoyed every second of it. I was surprised the show didn't take the full hour. I had a good fifteen minutes worth of questions to lend! :)

 

P.S. Thank you for your kind words!

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Well Jack, next time put a tape in the machine, hit rec and, go to sleep and watch sometime when repeats are on that you've seen before. That's what I did the other night with Gregory Peck. I'm sure you know your T.V. doesn't have to be on to tape. I buy 8 hour tapes for this specific reason, and use the SLP.

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Attention New Yorkers: For the first time in 126 years, the Metropolitan Opera is offering a free dress rehearsal. On September 22, 2006, the doors will open for the rehearsal of film director Anthony Minghella's (Talented Mr. Ripley, Cold Mountain...) new staging of Puccini's Madama Butterfly. The production, conducted by James Levine, will open the Met's season on September 25, with soprano Cristina Gallardo-Dom?s in the title role, Marcello Giordani as Pinkerton, Dwayne Croft as Sharpless, and Maria Zifchak as Suzuki.

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Wow, a free dress rehearsal--I'm not a New Yorker but I'd travel for that if I had the time--that's neat. Where I live opera is scarce and it's one of my favorite music styles, the other being music of the 30's 40's and 50's. Movies that include opera make it possible for me to enjoy seeing opera more often. I always enjoy watching the operatic musicals. There's a sequence in (I think) Zeigfield Follies of La Traviata that I especially enjoy although I regret that I can't remember the names of the singers. I also think the Madame Butterfly sequence in Toast of New Orleans is good in that it captures the essence of the Love Duet. Another is the Tchaikovsky sequence at the end of Maytime with MacDonald and Eddy.

Being another opera fan and classic movie fan, these movies are perfect .

As much as I like stage opera it's nice to have it in a movie setting sometimes.

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'Twas James Melton and Marion Bell who sang the rousing "Libiamo" from Verdi's La Traviata in The Ziegfeld Follies. This was American tenor James Melton's last movie. His film career overlapped with his career at the Metropolitan Opera (1942 to 1950). He started with celluloid in a short called The Last Dogie where he sang cowboy songs and performed rope tricks, but really took off in 1935's Stars Over Broadway. In this, his character was a singer at the Metropolitan, and in real life he prepared for an operatic career, making his debut as Madama Butterfly's Pinkerton in Cincinnati in 1938. Though Ms. Bell didn't have an opera career, she was widely known on stage and was the original Fiona in Broadway's Brigadoon and was married to lyricist Alan Jay Lerner (of Lerner and Loewe).

 

Thanks, mbmuva! I have Toast of New Orleans and Maytime on my list of movies to watch for...

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Thanks for the info on James Melton and Marion Bell. It's interesting to see how careers of singers like these develop and change.

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