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What is the best recent film you have seen?


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After seeing Cinderella Man mentioned a few times here I decided to give it a viewing. (I had thought it looked good when it was being promo'ed, just forgot to keep up with it.)

 

I sat down to watch it late last night. I was surprised by my own emotional "involvement" during certain parts - lol - especially since I kind of knew what was going to take place! Got caught up anyway. :-) I'm glad this thread reminded me to watch it. I thoroughly enjoyed it! *thumbs up*

 

(and I couldn't have timed it any better had I intentionally tried -- just as I shut off the dvd the tv tuned to TCM and what beginning credits do you think were running... Raging Bull! LOL)

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Thanks for a lot of good tips on moivies to check out, if I ever get the time. It's always interesting to see what people are recommending.

 

My problem is that I haven't seen very many new movies. I just don't have the time to to go very often.

 

But to add a not-so-recent movie.....

 

I thought that A Few Good Men was excellent entertainment. I was impressed that it told an engaging, even compelling story with out the benefit of action and sexual content. It was, to me, a throwback movie in many ways. It told a good story and developed it's plot, diologue and characters as you went along.

 

The phenomenal scene with Nicholson at the end was one of the finest pieces of acting I have ever seen - and great drama. It is remembered by all who have seen it. But it was only one small part of a movie dealing with a few very interesting themes, and sub plots. Yet the movie was told clearly and simply.

 

Like many old classics it was easy to get, but you were intrigued with the ride it gave you right to that great finish. Thank goodness a movie still comes around, every now and then, that can still do that.

 

The ethereal and sublime Field of Dreams is another remarkable film for similar reasons, though it told a completely different type of tale.

 

If anyone can suggest something that would compare in quality to either of those movies, I'd be interested in seeing it.

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Thanks for a lot of good tips on moivies to check out, if I ever get the time. It's always interesting to see what people are recommending.

 

My problem is that I haven't seen very many new movies. I just don't have the time to to go very often.

 

But to add a not-so-recent movie.....

 

I thought that A Few Good Men was excellent entertainment. I was impressed that it told an engaging, even compelling story with out the benefit of action and sexual content. It was, to me, a throwback movie in many ways. It told a good story and developed it's plot, diologue and characters as you went along.

 

The phenomenal scene with Nicholson at the end was one of the finest pieces of acting I have ever seen - and great drama. It is remembered by all who have seen it. But it was only one small part of a movie dealing with a few very interesting themes, and sub plots. Yet the movie was told clearly and simply.

 

Like many old classics it was easy to get, but you were intrigued with the ride it gave you right to that great finish. Thank goodness a movie still comes around, every now and then, that can still do that.

 

The ethereal and sublime Field of Dreams is another remarkable film for similar reasons, though it told a completely different type of tale.

 

If anyone can suggest something that would compare in quality to either of those movies, I'd be interested in seeing it.

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Thanks for a lot of good tips on moivies to check out, if I ever get the time. It's always interesting to see what people are recommending.

 

My problem is that I haven't seen very many new movies. I just don't have the time to to go very often.

 

But to add a not-so-recent movie.....

 

I thought that A Few Good Men was excellent entertainment. I was impressed that it told an engaging, even compelling story with out the benefit of action and sexual content. It was, to me, a throwback movie in many ways. It told a good story and developed it's plot, diologue and characters as you went along.

 

The phenomenal scene with Nicholson at the end was one of the finest pieces of acting I have ever seen - and great drama. It is remembered by all who have seen it. But it was only one small part of a movie dealing with a few very interesting themes, and sub plots. Yet the movie was told clearly and simply.

 

Like many old classics it was easy to get, but you were intrigued with the ride it gave you right to that great finish. Thank goodness a movie still comes around, every now and then, that can still do that.

 

The ethereal and sublime Field of Dreams is another remarkable film for similar reasons, though it told a completely different type of tale.

 

If anyone can suggest something that would compare in quality to either of those movies, I'd be interested in seeing it.

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Thanks for a lot of good tips on moivies to check out, if I ever get the time. It's always interesting to see what people are recommending.

 

My problem is that I haven't seen very many new movies. I just don't have the time to to go very often.

 

But to add a not-so-recent movie.....

 

I thought that A Few Good Men was excellent entertainment. I was impressed that it told an engaging, even compelling story with out the benefit of action and sexual content. It was, to me, a throwback movie in many ways. It told a good story and developed it's plot, diologue and characters as you went along.

 

The phenomenal scene with Nicholson at the end was one of the finest pieces of acting I have ever seen - and great drama. It is remembered by all who have seen it. But it was only one small part of a movie dealing with a few very interesting themes, and sub plots. Yet the movie was told clearly and simply.

 

Like many old classics it was easy to get, but you were intrigued with the ride it gave you right to that great finish. Thank goodness a movie still comes around, every now and then, that can still do that.

 

The ethereal and sublime Field of Dreams is another remarkable film for similar reasons, though it told a completely different type of tale.

 

If anyone can suggest something that would compare in quality to either of those movies, I'd be interested in seeing it.

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Thanks for a lot of good tips on moivies to check out, if I ever get the time. It's always interesting to see what people are recommending.

 

My problem is that I haven't seen very many new movies. I just don't have the time to to go very often.

 

But to add a not-so-recent movie.....

 

I thought that A Few Good Men was excellent entertainment. I was impressed that it told an engaging, even compelling story with out the benefit of action and sexual content. It was, to me, a throwback movie in many ways. It told a good story and developed it's plot, diologue and characters as you went along.

 

The phenomenal scene with Nicholson at the end was one of the finest pieces of acting I have ever seen - and great drama. It is remembered by all who have seen it. But it was only one small part of a movie dealing with a few very interesting themes, and sub plots. Yet the movie was told clearly and simply.

 

Like many old classics it was easy to get, but you were intrigued with the ride it gave you right to that great finish. Thank goodness a movie still comes around, every now and then, that can still do that.

 

The ethereal and sublime Field of Dreams is another remarkable film for similar reasons, though it told a completely different type of tale.

 

If anyone can suggest something that would compare in quality to either of those movies, I'd be interested in seeing it.

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I have to agree, IN AMERICA, was a fine movie. It's the story of a young Irish couple and their 2 young daughters who have recently immigrated to the USA and live in a run-down apartment building in NYC during the early 1980's.

 

Sandy K

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I agree with the posters who praised Capote. For once, the academy gave the best actor the award. In America was a beautifully rendered account of the modern immigrant experience. I also thought that Brokeback Mountain was a lovely composition of a story. It was almost as though Ang Lee made the landscape another character and Heath Ledger surprised me with the reticent sensitivity of his character. I thought that Good Night and Good Luck could've been a better account of Murrow and Co. during the McCarthy era, but David Strathairn is an exceptional actor, (see Blue Car sometime for a great performance by him). Since it's terribly hot here in the northeast today, my critical faculty may be set a bit lower than everyone else, but I'd like to mention one other interesting recent flick.

 

As far as I know, there's been very little said in the media or on these boards about Stage Beauty(2004) starring Claire Danes and Billy Crudup. Set in 17th century England during the Restoration of Charles II, it deals with the lifting of the ban on women characters being portrayed by females. Crudup plays the most famous "actress" of his time, Ned Kynaston, who loses his station in life, the theatre and his identity. Danes is his dresser, who longs to act.

 

One major quibble: the film shows what is believed to have been the declamatory style of acting popular at the time, evolving into something very like the psychological realism of today by the end of the film, at least in the scene we see the leads performing. The development of this kind of naturalism was more gradual, and really didn't come into full flower until the 20th century.

 

The recreation of this period by the art directors and costume designer led by production designer Jim Clay is extraordinarily rich and kept me entranced. The large cast is peopled with historical characters such as Samuel Pepys(Hugh Bonneville), Sir Edward Hyde(Edward Fox, who's a great fustian king's minister who seems to long for the good old days when Cromwell kept things tidier), and best of all, the king(Rupert Everett, having alot of fun) and as his mistress, Nell Gwynn, (a delightful Zoe Tapper). Richard Griffiths, plays a fop, and I can see why he won the Tony award just last Sunday, --he's a great character actor. Tom Wilkinson is totally wasted as the man who employs Kyanaston in his theatrical company. For anyone who appreciates backstage drama of any era, from Shakespeare in Love to 42nd Street, this will entertain you.

 

FYI: The Restoration period was a bawdy time, and this is NOT for the kiddies. It might be best described by the oxymoron: tastefully raunchy!

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Hello Everyone,

 

Today, I went to see "An Inconvenient Truth", a documentary by Al Gore about global warming.

It is an excellent film and very frightening. What carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses are doing to the atmosphere is an abomination.

 

Go and see it and then write your congressman or senator or governor and the president and demand they do something.

 

I have a new respect for Mr. Gore, who jokingly introduced himself as: "The former next president of the United States"..... Great guy!!

 

Larry

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Larry,

It sounds as though Al Gore's documentary left you stimulated rather than just in despair, which, having viewed Bowling for Columbine recently, is good to know. The latter film left me rather depressed about the future of the world and the ability of anyone to change it. I also didn't like Michael Moore's egotistical attitude, even though he was telling some important truths about our society, imho. I will probably see An Inconvenient Truth eventually, in part, because of your recommendation.

 

On a completely different note, I saw Finding Neverland yesterday. Having read and enjoyed "J.M. Barrie and the Lost Boys: the Real Story Behind Peter Pan" by Andrew Birkin, I was hoping that the film would deal with the complex relationship of Barrie to the family who inspired Peter Pan and the world of Edwardian London and the theatre. Barrie was, in modern terms, talented commercial playwright and a conflicted man who could not form what most people would regard, then or now, as mature, close relationships. The Llewelyn Davies family had one tragedy after another, a fate that followed its members to the end of their lives. The movie drastically oversimplifies and telescopes events and distorts personalities, especially that played by Julie Christie as Mrs. Du Maurier. Of the children, the boy who plays Peter is the best drawn character, and very well acted by Freddie Highmore. I can't say that Johnny Depp's performance did alot for me either--and he can be a highly entertaining actor in many cases.

 

Maybe I'd have enjoyed it more if I hadn't read the book and realized that the real story is much richer than the one the filmmakers chose to tell. But of course, that wouldn't have made for a neatly told movie.

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Hi Songbird,

 

Mr. Gore does not come across as a harping vehemist and upright, uptight moralist as Michael Moore does. While Moore has some honest concerns that we all should be aware of, he is going for the notoriety factor and dare I say, Star factor of publicity. He's a jerk trying to be hip and with it and NOT!!!

Mr. Gore does not need to be in pursuit of stardom and notoriety, he has been there, done that...

 

He simply lays out the facts, with pictures and graphs and simplicity and gets us to thinking. I liked him and I think he's an honest man; something that cannot be said for Georgie Boy and Poor Shot Chaney..........

 

Larry

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I agree that "In America" was a very good movie done by the same director who did The Boxer w/ Daniel Day-Lewis, Jim sheridan.It's an all around Irish show of the best of talent. I really liked the actuation of the colored, sickly neighbor, I would give you his name but it's one of those hard to pronounce African names.

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Djimon Hounsou played the sickly neighbor of the Irish family and I believe that his name is pronounced "Jie-mon Hahn-soo". He brings a gravity, a sneaky humor, and a real presence to every role that I've seen him in from Amistad to ER to In America. I believe that he's originally from Benin on the west coast of Africa.

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I think people should look at both sides of the global warming issue before forming a decision on it, and not just listen to the one with the most PR on the subject. And I don't mean the liberal vs. conservative sides, but the non-experts vs. the experts. While some of those on the fossil fuel bandwagon may be scientists, the majority of those aren't in the climatology field. Some are biologists who research the effect of climate change on animals and plants, but aren't qualified to determine what the cause is. Those who are climatologists, paleoclimatologists, oceanographers and meteorologists say global warming is bunk. Not just in this country, but hundreds of them worldwide who aren't subject to this country's political differences. The science journals are a better source for science than pop culture. Here's a good article on Gore's movie and the junk science behind his facts.

 

http://www.canadafreepress.com/2006/harris061206.htm

 

Think of it this way ... instead of global warming, the problem is a tooth ache. On one side you have a dentist, and on the other a podiatrist. Both are doctors, but who would you go to for your tooth ache? Branches of science are just as specialized.

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