Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Mel Gibson Flicks


kitsy
 Share

Recommended Posts

Mel Gibson is one of my favorite actors. I list his best movies as "Braveheart" and "The Patriot". I'm also a fan of his "Lethal Weapon" series. Although "The Passion of The Christ" is good, I just can't seemed to watch it as much because of the violent scenes depicting the scourging of Jesus. But all in all I'm interested in more opinions about your picks for favorite Mel Gibson fare.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Feaito's choice of The Year of Living Dangerously(1982), as usual reflects his thoughtfulness. Surely, this is one of the more politically sophisticated and, if Mel Gibson action fans will permit me, romantic films of Gibson's career. Gibson and Sigourney Weaver had enormous chemistry and were both at the height of their youthful beauty. Peter Weir's storytelling takes us to Sukarno's Indonesia as well as to the physical and emotional climate that Westerners are often overwhelmed by when traveling to cultures so different from our own. Only the truth-telling character brilliantly played by Linda Hunt sees what's happening to the people and the place that they're caught up in during the course of the story.I will have to rent this film again to experience from a mature perspective, but I suspect that I'll find something new to appreciate. Thanks for reminding me of it, feaito.

 

My own choice of an interesting Mel Gibson film would probably be We Were Soldiers(2002) . As in most recent Gibson movies, his personal views aside, this is a well written, very well acted movie, based on actual events and people, that depicts soldiers and their loved ones caught up in a flawed war, (is there any other kind?), who, while trying to maintain some ties to civilized behavior, attempt to behave in an honorable fashion, protecting one another as best they can, with most of the action centering around action at Ia Dang in Vietnam in Oct. & Nov., 1965. It is, at times quite violent, but the evocation of a time, place and people was very effectively rendered. Madeleine Stowe and Gibson both give quietly moving performances. Btw, the book it's based on by Harold Moore & Joseph Galloway is quite well written as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One thing about Mel Gibson's directorial choices that I find interesting is that "The Man Without a Face," "Braveheart" and "The Passion of the Christ," all have a sort of common theme. They each deal with a man who delivers "salvation" to a people (person). In each case, the history of the man is vague or unknown. We know little of Sir Henry Wallace's or Christ's early lives, and we know little of the fictitious, man without a face. Also in each case, the man is crucified, literally or figuratively, by a form of government, yet his lesson(s) surpasses his fate at their hands. Christ delivered spiritual salvation, Wallace delivered salvation in the form of freedom, and the man without a face delivered salvation through academics ... not only that, but through positive male mentorship for a boy without a father (see also: Iron John).

 

I wonder if this was all a conscious decision on his part.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

> "The Man Without a Face," "Braveheart" and "The

> Passion of the Christ," all have a sort of common theme.

 

That's a very interesting theory. I think you're on to something.

 

This isn't related to your theory, but I do have Gibson-related story.

 

About ten years ago, I had a chance to visit the William Wallace Memorial near Stirling Castle in Scotland. I talked to the woman in the gift shop, and she said that Braveheart was well received by the locals. Gibson even had a special screening nearby. Because of all the attention, a sculptor was hired to create a statue of William Wallace to be placed at the base of the memorial. Here's a photo I took of that statue: http://www.davidenglish.com/mm/stationery/SlideShow/wallace.jpg.

 

So what's wrong with this picture? The statue?s face looks more like Gibson than Wallace (there were paintings of Wallace in the memorial). I asked the woman at the gift shop about this, and she explained that the sculptor completed his work just after seeing the movie. She seemed a little embarrassed about the mistaken identity.

 

I was told later that there's a movement in Scotland to remove the statue because it doesn?t represent the historical Wallace. After the officials in charge stated they wouldn't remove it, someone sprayed it with red paint. The officials then encased the statue in Plexiglas, in order to protect it from similar incidents.

 

DavidE

http://www.classicfilmpreview.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The statue?s face looks more like Gibson than Wallace (there were paintings of Wallace in the memorial).

 

That's not surprising, since there's really nothing to go on as to what Wallace looked like. I've read a couple biographies, one by a descendant, who wrote the screenplay for the movie. There's not much to go on other than legends and the British historians of the time.

 

I've read someone on these boards claiming that the movie wasn't historically accurate, but that's to be expected. Unless, they have 'Da Vinci Code-like" evidence of Wallace's life. I wish we did, because he was a real hero.

 

Thanks for the links.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice story about the Hollywoodized statue of William Wallace/Mel Gibson, David. It reminds me of an experience that my professional artist uncle had in the mid-1950s. He was commisioned to illustrate a new hardcover edition of Moby Dick. He completed several illustrations, incorporating his extensive knowledge of Melville's story and the sea into each illustration. The publishers were happy with his work--up to a point--except for the cover image of Ahab. They repeatedly sent it back to him to be reworked and finally told him that they were looking for something alot more like Gregory Peck, who, of course, had played the Captain of the Pequod in the John Huston film of that period.

 

Uncle Charlie, who had five children and a mortgage to meet, finally delivered an Ahab with a slightly chiseled Peckish jawline and some truly crazy looking grey eyes--but he never liked himself for doing it! Btw, whenever I've found a copy of this edition in a used book store, it's priced higher whenever it includes the "Gregory Peck" looking dust jacket! Charlie's illustrations in the interiors of the deluxe edition don't include anyone who looks as streamlined as the actor, I'm happy to report.

;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's interesting how a face or visual image will imprint itself in a way that's hard to shake off. Try listening to The Sorcerer's Apprentice or Night on Bald Mountain without imagining some of the images from Fantasia (1940). After the Adam Dalgliesh detective stories were adapted for BBC television, author P. D. James had a difficult time writing other Dalgliesh stories without seeing actor Roy Marsden's face and demeanor.

 

It works for words and phrases, too. You mentioned "Uncle Charlie," and I immediately recalled the movie Shadow of a Doubt (1943). It sounds like your Uncle Charlie had an entirely different personality, though.

 

By the way, I see the name songbird2, and I think of, ?Songbird to Penny. Songbird to Penny.? Is your name a reference to the plane in the 1950s Saturday morning television program, Sky King?

 

DavidE

http://www.classicfilmpreview.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David,

 

That statue of poor old William Wallace looks like "Fred Flintstone" to me. I had to laugh.

If I was William, I'd rise from the dead and smash it....

 

Here in Calgary, we have a large statue of Robert the Bruce - on a horse and in full chain mail armour. He and the horse are on a large plinth and on a hill overlooking the Bow River here. Very impressive.

He looks more the hero than that pitiful tribute to WW.

 

Larry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Signs(2002) is another interesting, slowly unfolding story that Gibson was involved in. He also produced, and appeared in an effective bit part at the end in a film that I loved: Fairy Tale(1997) about an actual case at the end of WWI when two little girls claimed to be photographing fairies in the woods near their home. Their claims intrigued an enormous number of people in a war weary time, including Arthur Conan Doyle, (played by Peter O'Toole, despite the fact that Conan Doyle was quite portly). I think that Mel Gibson has a strong affinity for working with children, as evidenced by these two films and the aforementioned Man Without a Face. I guess that may be one of the advantages of having seven offspring, eh?

 

Hey David--no, I wasn't thinking of Sky King and Penny when I picked songbird as my name, though your reference to them made laugh. Actually, I'd recently been reading the new bio of Peggy Lee, called "Fever" by Peter Richmond and since she always struck me as quite the songbird...thus my moniker. Good book, complicated and talented lady, btw.

 

Funny that you should mention Fantasia, one of the few classic cartoons I've never seen--"Night on Bald Mountain" is still a piece of dramatic music to my ears. I couldn't help think of another piece of music that's forever tainted for me, however, thanks to my exposure to American popular culture over a lifetime.

 

Bruce Springsteen's "You're Riding in My Car" echoes for me with an inspired bit that Robin Williams did back in the days when he was just trying to be a wonderful clown, not an actor who seems to specialize in playing serial killers. He sang the lyrics just as Elmer Fudd would've--and it came out something like this: Youwe widing in my caw, I tuwn on the wadio,/ I'm puhhing you cwosew/ you say you don't wike it/ but I know yoew a wiarrrrr/'cause when we kwiss...owww...Fiawa!"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Songbird, I'm an illustrator and I sympathize with your uncle. There are some assignments I choose to stay clear of, but once you sign onto one, you're at the whim of the art director's vision. There are very few people in the business today that can escape that and dictate their own terms. Illustrators are seen as the bottom of the barrel in the art world. Graphic designers see them as subordinates because someday they'll be the art director who hires them, and fine artsists look down their noses at them. This is funny because illustrators can do both their jobs ... we can be both designer and fine artist.

 

The thing about the movie "Signs" that ruined it for me was, if water killed the aliens, they would die the first moment they set foot out of their spaceship from all the water vapor in the air. Especially when they're running through the cornfields at night with all the dew on the leaves and in the grass. I figure if they're advanced enough to make it to earth in a ship, they would be able to read the atmosphere and turn around to high tail it home, once they saw all that H2O in our atmosphere. What I liked about the movie was Phoenix's obsession with the news, watching the 24/7 news channels for the alien information, because it mirrors the way people do become obsessed with some news stories.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I realize this is a little off topic, but has anyone seen Mel in Dame Edna's Christmas Special? It is out on DVD. He was so young, and so handsome! And, NAKED! He spent the whole time in the sauna on the special. It kept cutting to him with a towel wrapped around his waist, and slipping off! WOW! Let's hear it for youth!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...