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GarboManiac

Hedy Lamarr: The Most Beautiful Star!

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I think I know what you're talking about-theirs were more like cloaks,with stiff collars-the one I have fits closer,it's a strange shape-and the collar is relatively soft,and was often worn turned up to look dashing. It went well with the cloche hats and bobbed hair of the era.

 

 

I love Norma,most especially in her pre-Codes. She's just delightful-yes,genuine,but also rather mannered-as in "mannerisms"-but I love them :) and so flirtatious. She seemed to be a natural-born flirt,but in a delightful light-hearted way,not a pushy overtly "sexy" way. Just so friendly :)

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Ok, you're going to be so jealous but in the gas stations here we still have an attendant who puts the gas in for you, the town I live in has a small town square where a lot of the businesses are locally owned and we all know one another.As for the wooden floors, a lot of the houses here still have them. the wooden houses are my favorite but they aren't recommended because of the termite situation .

There are several typical American businesses but we still have the small town quaintness. As for the music, I can understand, I love Nat King Cole, Billie Holiday,Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Etta James,etc.

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When I think of the union of Norma Shearer/Irving Thalberg I feel like it must have been the old opposites attract type of thing.

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Oh my gosh-that was great,when the lawyer takes off his spectacles,prolonging the agony,and finally says the name of the heir-the way the titles were done,LOL!

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I would NEVER accuse my girl Norma of being mercenary-I really don't think that she was that-but she was very ambitious when young,and I think she used a lot of rationality when she chose a husband. I think that she loved Irving,and she was always tender and careful of him,very deferential to his mother,and to his needs,but I don't think that it was a case of being swept off her feet. I myself see nothing wrong with that. They seemed to have had a kind of bargain,besides affection for each other,and she lived up to her part,and mourned him when he died. It's no worse,in my opinion, than some marriages based on a passion of the moment,that turn out to be less than true love. And Norma had two happy marriages,and no divorce-almost a record in Hollywood.

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I knew it! About halfway into the movie,I knew it was that younger guy,and I figured that that other guy looking for the escaped lunatic was in on it!

 

I have to say,I had expected that Laura LaPlante's character was going to be more courageous and resourceful,instead of shaking and fainting and yelling "HEEEELLLP!" all the time. Mary Pickford would've walloped the guy!

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Ok, I'm back. Well, I have to say, I was very disappointed in that film. You are right she was very wishy washy. I was in and out cause I had so many animal problems. I have two cats and two dogs, and I have to get them all ready for bed.

But, anyway. I much rather enjoyed the previews of Hedy Lamarr in H.M.Pullam, Esq. after the movie! I couldn't believe it! There was Hedy! Yeah!

 

I think it's time for another picture!! Just to remind everyone whose thread this is!

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pic09464.jpg

 

 

 

 

Just a reminder~~

 

 

 

 

"At her Austrian husband Fritz Mandl's armament company, she observed that radio-guided torpedoes were susceptible to jamming. Leaving der Vaterland in order to avoid personal participation in the Holocaust, she later obtained a secret U.S. patent on the idea of frequency hopping, shared with artist George Antheil. Their scheme used a mechanical device similar to the guts of a player piano to modulate the RF signal. Stonewalled by the good-old-boys of the Pentagon, Ms. Keisler's invention was not put to use by the military until the mid 1950s, after the patent expired. However, her work is regarded as the basis for all spread-spectrum techniques, including those used in today's wireless networks.

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Wow! dpd, that is a beautiful image of a mature Hedy! She was about 40 in that pic. And, I love the footnote about her intelligence and contribution to science! Good Job! Wonder if TOOMANYNOTES has seen it yet?

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GM & TMN,

 

So, I take it you like her, you really like her!!

Oops, I've morphed into Sally Field mode for a moment there.

 

I saw her on 'Merv Griffin Show' around 1970 - 72, and she looked very good.

My mother had lunch with her in Montreal in 1980 and she was turning heads even then. It was at an outdoor sidewalk cafe and some university students recognized her and asked laughingly if she'd cut their hair (Delilah!).. She said, "Sure, but you provide the scissors!"......

My mother said she was a big hit with those boys. And, she was in her 60's.

So, so much for looking like Frankenstein!!!!!!!!!

 

Larry

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I could never understand the fuss about Hedy Lamarr. A pretty average looker IMO. In every photo she had a blank, vacant expression. No acting talent to speak of. Bland and forgettable.

What exactly is the appeal?

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It's just sheer unadulterated natural beauty. Other actresses had more talent, in some cases a lot more. She had an agreeable screen presence. If there was any problem at all it may be that her studio(s) didn't give her enough really good material.

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Thank you, movieman! An apt answer! And, dpd, great side by side shots of Norma and Hedy. Norma was MARVELOUS! AND, HEDY WAS BREATHTAKING.

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I have seen that before, and you know she got really good reviews! It was like the first time she ever got to play in a role like Greer, or Ingrid. And, remember, everyone, she is not either! She is Hedy! And, we love her just the way she is, breathtaking!

 

Plus, I love Ruth Hussey, and she is in this, too!

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At least she wasn't a beautiful dumb bell-maybe she wasn't an actress of the magnitude of Sarah Bernhardt,but she was intelligent,and beautiful-how much can be expected of one (supernaturally beautiful) human? And she did make her mark on Hollywood,and is remembered and loved today. There weren't all that many really GREAT actresses in Hollywood-but that's not what Hollywood is ALL about,is it? And anyway,I think she doesn't get all the credit for her acting that she should-there were many pretty women(maybe none quite as classically beautiful as Hedy) who never made a mark on Hollywood,looks or no looks. I also think that her talent was somewhat squandered,as she was wonderfully expressive in "Ecstasy",which was silent,for all intents and purposes.

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Well, I really enjoyed that film. Talk about values and morals of old film. It was packed with duty, right and wrong, the old way and the new, honor, love, and everyone did a wonderful job with their part!

 

Robert Young was very believable and enjoyable as the leading man. I love Ruth Hussey! She is just so sincere and regular. But, Hedy was very good. There were moments when I thought her timing was perfect. A couple of movements she made that were supposed to be reactions to him or someone or something were right on target. Like when the champagne bottle popped and the moment she realized he might leave her and the tears came just at the right moment.

 

Well, of course I am prejudice!

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