Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

why do you love "old"movies?


oldmoviedork
 Share

Recommended Posts

I hate much of the world around me these days. With old movies I can escape for a while to a more simple, innocent time. Granted, the world was pretty horrible sixty years ago. There were exceptions (war films, for one), but most of the time Hollywood glossed over much of the ugliness and simply entertained people. It wasn't real, of course, but much more fun.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sometimes, for nostalgia's sake - not because I saw the movies when they were new, but because I saw them in my youth, and they were new to me. They are now familiar and comfortable.

 

Sometimes for their aesthetic value. They just look so good.

 

And they are rich in historical vlaue, either for the people who made them, or the glimpses of daily life in a time I never knew.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Less explicit treatment of sex, violence, and language.

 

Familiarity of stars.

 

Development of supporting characters.

 

Sharper narratives. I once read that a 1939 script shot in 1964 would be about a half hour longer because of all the scenic setups.

 

Historical fascination.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Old" movies to me are simply richer than mainstream contemporary films. The genres were all well-represented in any given year and within them there were studios and directors with their own recognizable touch and a wide variety of timeless players and stories. The power of suggestion was used much more because of the Production Code, and if the Code did keep some stories from being as, um, vivid as they should, it at least usually let the innuendo reach the adult members of the audience for which some themes were intended.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the classic movies had alot more depth in that the stories were more grounded .You got alot of value and ethics from them Like for example It's A Wonderful Life George was so hard working and he kept losing opportunitys to go away and have the life he wanted but in the end of the movie because of all his sacrifice he gets so much back in the way of his family and friends.Now The Good Earth is on I have to go watch it .Inglis

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, I have got to see that! When is it on again? I will have to check the guide. Go over to Seen Any Good Movies Lately? and talk about it when your done!

 

Well, I love the old movies because 1) they were a wealth of knowledge. I learned slang, culture, sophistication, fashion, geography, morals, standards, ethics, sincerity, hate, humility, suffering, etc. all from the old movies. I grew up on these films, and they shaped my character, something films today don't necessarily do. 2) I love them for the relationships between people. They were honest, and straightforward. People said what they felt and discussed their emotions. Right always won out over wrong, and you always ended up winning if you repented and apologized, even if you lost. Love meant strength and suffering, but it was worth every bump in the road. And 3) I learned my definition of beauty from the old films. I always tell people I live for beauty, for that, to me, encompasses truth, character, bravery, sacrifice, and passion, as well as, fantastic bone structure! I AM the old movies.

 

All of my dreams, work ethics, relationships and aspirations are all tied up in old movies. Everyone there in that "dream world" is an old friend. I know them well, and I know their character. I feel so sad for those who don't have the old films as a major artery in their being. They are a powerful force, a road map to right and wrong containing all the elements needed for life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I feel so sad for those who don't have the old films as a major artery in their being. They are a powerful force, a road map to right and wrong containing all the elements needed for life. >>

 

GarboM,

 

How very true about the power of movies. One of the things that I love about older films is that insight they give us as to who we were as a culture, as a society, as people. The values that were important to us and the things in life worth fighting for. Many of us of a certain age learned from westerns that a man's (or woman's) word was his/her bond and that it wasn't always necessary to win but that living by a code of honor was more important.

 

I think one reason older movies still resonate with so many of us is because we grew up watching them. We didn't have cable, but we had a local broadcast version of the Million Dollar Movie. Growing up in the 1960s and early 1970s, the Hollywood/Studio era wasn't that far removed from our daily lives, the Depression and WW2 were reminders to us because our parents had lived through them and the history of the 1930s and 1940s didn't seem that old. I vaguely remember the passing of the last Civil War vet when I was a youngster.

 

Alot has changed in America since those days. Alot has changed in our culture, our society and we, as a people, have changed. Those days that didn't seem so far apart from us as children and teenagers are now sixty and seventy years past for today's generation. They don't necessarily have the same touchstones with films and history that we do. It's not anyone's fault.

 

We as a country went through some times of great social change and upheaval in the 1960s and 1970s and many of those changes were for the better.

 

But one of the joys of films is that they capture forever those moments in time that have passed into history and because of film, we can relive our pasts and the things that meant so much to us, because in the end, it's not necessarily the story, the actors or the actresses, the writer, director or the producer that we remember. It's the images.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your sentiments are wonderful, GM. TCM should reprint this on the main website - you have, I think, put into very eloquent words the thoughts of most of us who love the classics.

 

And specifically, I think you are on to something when you say that the new crop of films doesn't stay with us after we've seen them. I don't think most of them are intended to do so. It's the use it once, throw it away mentality. I can remember very little from current movies after the first few weeks, but I can still get shivers, or be saddened, or laugh, about films I saw thirty years ago.

 

Whatever its evils or economic drawbacks, the studio system had its good points, and making terrific movies was the primary good point. Also, this current mania for tasteless publicity and childish and objectionable behavior among film actors would never have been permitted back in the day. The people in charge are a different breed (most seem to be in various states of arrested development), and therein lies the difference in quality.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, thanks guys! And, you all make excellent points as well.

 

inglis, I loved your example of George in It's A Wonderful Life. Struggling and seemly getting nowhere. Getting passed by and having to pass by on so many opportunities. That was life! That is life. So few of us ever amount to much, except to our friends and families. And, those were the values of the old films. Most all of us grew up in families that taught "wrong is wrong, even if everyone is doing it, and right is right, even if no one is doing it."

 

lzcutter, the values you talked about, especially "your word is your bond" are dying out. I talk to so many young people who won't sign a paper, and if they didn't, then they say there is no contract. I ask them if they "said" they would do something and many times they say yes. I try to explain that it is the same as signing, but they don't think so. And, then there are some who sign and still feel nothing about not living up to their bargain.

 

jdb1, you were talking about the tastelessness of today. Well, one reason is because there are no "father figures" to keep everyone in line. I know most of them were hardly "angels," but they kept everyone in line. In the old studio system, everyone belonged to a family that meant protection. You had obligations for certain behavior, and if you didn't come across you got punished. There were consequences. Your salary might have even been cut, but then you were brought back out and given another picture. Your star still shone because there was organization, and a hierarchy. Today, it's just helter skelter. And, you are right about the throw away mentality. Most of the STARS get thrown away. Here today, gone tomorrow. No job security makes you stoop to behaviors generally unacceptable in order to keep youself in the limelight. It really is a shame.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love great movies no matter when or where they were made. Can I help it if the vast majority of those movies happen be old movies (which is to be expected with 100+ years of movies)?

 

We do have one very real advantage over film fans living in the 1920s, 1930s, or 1940s. On a regular basis, we can see many (if not most) of the best films ever made. Thank you, TCM. Thank you, NetFlix. Thank you, Amazon and Deep Discount DVD. And when I'm visiting New York, thank you, Museum of Modern Art, Film Forum, Anthology Film Archives, and other repertory theaters.

 

DavidE

http://www.classicfilmpreview.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for your post.

I love old movies because they bring back the importance of values that we seem to lack today.As you said, you watch them for the nostalgia, that's perfect.

I see in them the wonder and questions and hopes that I had in my youth when I shared them w/ my Mom.I see the world in the way I saw it back then when anything seemed possible.

I love the black and white films, they are special to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That was the first time I saw it and I really liked it although I had a hard time watching Greer Garson play a maid.I have always liked her and we got a good look at her in glorious black and white.As for Gregory Peck , smooth like always,he was the youngest I've seen him.Lionel Barrymore was immaculate as always, I expect nothing less from him.I to, was, in and out of that movie, I was cooking dinner.I need to see it again uninterrupted.

Cagney69......Charming is a great description for the classics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know! You hate to see your favorites in subordinate positions! Ha! So, the best one for you would be Mrs. Parkington. It is a fabulous story of Mr. Parkington's rise to riches and his choice of a bride is, of course, Greer! She is fantastic as the poor daughter of a miner who becomes the great matriarch of regal descendents too uppity for their own good. But, she puts everyone in their place by the end of the movie!

 

Ok, I'm off! Tomorrow!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...