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LuckyDan

Your most memorable movie theater experience?

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What a great story about Miss O'Hara. A friend of mine did the computer graphics for that movie. The ballroom scene was his. That'll be our six degrees.

 

Feel free to private message any material that you "can't repeat here". :)

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"That'll be our six degrees..."

 

Well, you can add me to that list then too.

My best friend was the understudy for the voice of the plant (and asst. puppeteer, or such) in the original Off-B'way "Little Shop Of Horrors" for years and knew writer/director Howard Ashman well before he left the theater for Disney. I got to meet Mr. Ashman once.

 

I don't think I have ever been more thrilled with a Best Picture Academy Award nomination than the one "Beauty And The Beast" received.

 

Kyle In Hollywood

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After the first musical number in Beauty and the Beast, I told my husband what a great play it would make. Haven't seen a check yet from Disney, LOL

 

Although it didn't take place in a theater, I had an experiece watching The Wizard of Oz that still makes me giggle to myself. A friend and I where watching it in her house, her mom was gone and we started sipping "just a little" of mom's vodka. By the time the house hit OZ we where dancing on the couch, trying hard not to fall off. Her mom came home early just about the time the witch is melting and I swear her mom looked a little witch-like. Linda was trying to get me to quit laughing and I couldn't. Then I started singing Ding Dong the Witch is Dead, not the thing to do. Linda got in so much trouble but I didn't because her mom didn't tell my parents about it. I was maybe 14 or 15 at the time. I don't tell the kids about that episode.

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> I wish I would have taken hallucinogenic's before I

> saw "The Wiz" last night. It might have been a great

> movie under those circumstances! ;)

 

It couldn't have hurt. And an extra dose for that horrid Larry Semon OZ thing. The only thing that helped that movie was my kids doing a Myster Science Theater commentary during it.

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After the first musical number in Beauty and the Beast, I told my husband what a great play it would make.

 

I know when I saw it, I felt the same after the first song, except I really felt this was a song like a Broadway show. Of course, that was their background. And when I did get to see the Broadway show, I was worried how well it would translate but it was terrific, too.

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I don't think I have ever been more thrilled with a Best Picture Academy Award nomination than the one "Beauty And The Beast" received.

 

I wanted so much for it to win. I was even to be a seat filler for that Oscars show but I got held back until the next one. I would like to have seen Paige performing with Richard White on the show. I did get to see her later performing at the Hollywood Bowl with him.

 

I had decided a few days ago that I wanted to head to Vegas at some ppoint this week to see the new production of Phantom of the Opera. And coincidentally enough, after I posted my initial thing about Paige today in this thread, I looked up to see what she is doing now. It turns out she is singing in a Vegas revue. I decided I will catch it while I am there, and then discovered another one of the main cast is someone else I know who lives in my building. I can't imagine the odds on that one. Now, if only I can be the next person to be successful from my building...

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>

> I hate walking out of new film and saying it is a

> classic, but that is what I did with B&B.

 

I don't necessarily thing age makes a movie classic--it's that sort of timeless quality that does it. Most of Disney Films have it--they appeal to generation after generation.

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Most memorable theatre experience was either seeing GWTW on the big screen for the first time when I was about 12, in the Sorg Opera House, which is all plush seats adn gilding--what a theatre should be or possibly seeing the first Star Wars movie and that first scene with the giant ship filling the screen--I'd never seen anything like it.

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Having grown up with movies, I have many memorable movie theater related experiences, and it is difficult to single out one. I'll list only a few:

 

It wasn?t until I saw the color version of ? The Wizard of Oz? on TV, that I remembered my father bought me a miniature hourglass with red sand in it in the lobby of the theater where we first saw ?The Wizard of Oz?. That color presentation unplugged a channel of memory flowing to a childhood theater experience.

 

One of my first memories of a movie theater experience was as a child being brought to a revival performance of ?The Sheik?, with my parents and other relatives. I was overwhelmed by the sight of that elegant and now long-gone Mastbaum Theater on Market Street in Philadelphia.

 

A very vivid memory was in an unconventional theater, a mess hall in Korea, where they were showing ?The Thing?. To this day I can?t forget the image of seven or eight of my soldier buddies, including me, huddled close together watching what was then a ?scary? movie.

 

One more memory is that of my wife and I going to a neighborhood theater to see ?The Sting?. We were a few minutes late and there were no cashier or ushers in sight. We took seats and saw the entire movie free. While there was applause and cheering during the movie, it was one of the few times we heard spontaneous, genuine, appreciative applause after the movie ended and while the credits were rolling.

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My memorable theater experience was fairly recent. I don't do a lot of movies but a few years ago I took my, then, 13 yr old daughter to a theater to see "Roman Holiday." It's her favorite movie. It was nice to sit in a theater full of people who looked like they had seen the movie 50 years ago and some that had never seen it before. Everyone laughed at the right times and I could almost feel everyone enjoying themselves. It was also fun listening to the people going on about how much fun they had when they came out.

 

My daughter and I have been looking for another old movie to go to but with little luck. It was a fine day.

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Going to see GWTW at the Kings Theater when I was about 12 with my Mom.We took the bus and it was about a 15 minute ride .My Mom would not tell me where we were going ,it was a surprise.We got off the bus and low and behold on the big marquee was GONE WITH THE WIND .... I was really excited because my Mom always talked about it and how she went to see it with her mom my Grandma ,and this was like a tradition thing ,it was being handed down to me .We had the best time and I fell in love with that movie .My Mom is gone now and if it comes back to the big screen ,I want to take my daughter to see it.

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One experience that I try not to think of was seeing Tora Tora Tora and wanting to become invisible. It was the first time I had heard "dirty ****" and it was directed at my mother, brother, sister and myself.

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I laughingly recall the first time I saw The Wizard of Oz on the big screen (a VERY big one, in an old Washington, D.C. theatre called The Uptown). I had seen it countless times on television while growing up, but I remember how I was still in suspense as the Scarecrow, Tinman and Cowardly Lion made their way up the mountain to save Dorothy. There's nothing like the big screen.

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When I was really young, my mother took us to see Steve Reeves in HERCULES. She told us he was a very strong man who lived a long time ago. I thought we were going to see a live act featuring a really old man! It wasn't until the picture appeared on the screen that I realized it was a movie. I now know it's a laughably bad one. But at the time, I loved it. Didn't even see that most of the dialogue was dubbed. And you better believe I saw all the Steve Reeves adventures that followed in the early 60's.

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Here's another one. After the Bond series really caught on with GOLDFINGER, the studio re-issued the earlier ones in a double feature format. My mom, my brother and I saw DOCTOR NO and FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE. The first and best of the bunch. If you're too young to remember the craze, this may not sound too exciting. But in 1964, it was quite something. It initiated a fondness that, to this day, hasn't completely dissipated. This, despite the fact that the series has been a joke for 30 years!

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The standing ovation at the end of "Return of the King".

Peter Jackson had given us something worth going to cinema again for.

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My most memorable theatre experience had nothing to do with the movies in question. I went to see a horror movie double feature on a weekday afternoon in the early 80s and, after paying my $2.50 to get in, discovered that I was the only person in the theatre! Mind you, this was not one of these 200 multiplex theatres, this was an old-school cinema with 500-600 seats. It was cavernous. And getting to watch both movies, totally alone in the dark, was absolutely magical.

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It was the second time me and my friends all went to see Walk The Line! It had alredy been out for ages and it was about to come out on DVD, so there was no one there except us! We all love a laugh and because we all love Johnny Cash, we danced and sang all the way through the songs! It was so much fun! And we weren't bold by any means but we got pretty hyper! And I'll always remember it!

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This past weekend I attended BLOBFEST in Phoenixville, PA (outside Philly) and had the pleasure of watching THE BLOB in the theatre that the Blob attacks in the movie. Such fun. And the town residents have embraced their little spot in film history.

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Now that's cool. How is that theatre? Have they kept it up? Does it still look as it did in The Blob? I wonder why they shot it in Pennsylvania. Sure there were movie theatres closer to the studios that would have been cheaper for the company to use. Did they explain how this came about?

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THE BLOB was produced by a little outfit called Valley Forge Films and shot almost entirely in the Phoenixville/Dowingtown Area. (The Dowingtown Dinner which appears to be across the street from the theatre in the movie is actually 18 miles away.) It was only after the film was completed that it was sold to Paramount.

 

The theatre looks almost exactly like it does in the movie- they've done a decent job in its up keep. The only noticeable difference is that the wooden doors have been removed and new Black Deco-looking ones installed. The marquee still looks the same (minus the "Healthfully Aiir Conditioned" banner seen in the movie).

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There were so many San Francisco repertory houses in the 1980's; I spent many nights in the dark each week. It was great to see Dial M for Murder at the Electric Theatre and Kiss Me Kate on the big screen of the Castro movie palace -- both in 3D. In Oakland's Paramount theatre -- the grandest movie palace I've ever seen (used as a location for Coppola's Tucker: The Man and His Dream ) -- I saw San Francisco and The Adventures of Robin Hood -- both with delightfully enthusiastic audiences. Baby Face at the Roxie. Outside of the cinema I saw The Passion of Joan of Arc with the San Francisco Symphony accompanying it. Sublime.

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My grandmother sent me to get popcorn during the Incredible Mr. Limpet. I was about 8 or 9 years-old and I returned with popcorn for my little sister and grandmother, but with my money I bought a magazine featuring this new musical sensation--The Beatles. Grandma was not too happy. (The theater was either the Fox or Paramount in Oakland, CA).

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