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LuckyDan

Your most memorable movie theater experience?

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Rumors are that the Oakland Fox is about to undergo some sort of restoration. Thank goodness it hasn't been felled by the wrecking ball yet, even if it has been empty all these years. But it's survival has allowed the city of Oakland to mull over different ideas, rather than tearing it down and then thinking about it (as has happened in so many cities). Everytime I see the Fox Plaza San Francisco's Market Street I shed a bitter tear over the demise of the fantastic Fox Theatre that once stood there. It's inconceivable that anyone would take away something that special...

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I LOVE STUFF LIKE THAT! (See The Blob.) That must have been fascinating. Do you live in the area? Or did you travel for the event? The theatre scene is the best in the movie. I like B movies anyway. Your story is amazing!

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The Fox Theatre in Atlanta was an amazing place, and as far as I know it's still there. It went to live shows and concerts in the 1970s, and I got to hear Count Basie and his Orchestra there. I'll never forget the stars overhead in the planetarium-style ceiling.

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Having my first movie experience watching South Pacific - I was 5 when the movie came out (don't guess my age now!), and every relative under-the-sun took me to see this wonderful film - that I still love today. I also remember my parents taking me to the "road-show" version of "My Fair Lady". Both experiences were in beautiful old-style theatres in Cleveland, Ohio.

 

I still have a love of musicals to this day. Especially Rodgers and Hammerstein.

 

Wish they'd play Flower Drum Song on TCM - love to get that on DVD.

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"The Fox Theatre in Atlanta was an amazing place, and as far as I know it's still there."

 

Indeed, it's very much there! I made a special trip to see it a few years back. I missed the tour, dog-gone-it. But a very nice usher gave me a quick one, showing me the ballroom and some other rooms that they have. And then I saw a movie there -- The Horse Whisperer. I hated the movie; it didn't live up to the surroundings and so wished they were showing a revival of something. I don't think I stayed until the end; I just needed to see something projected on the screen and after an hour or so left satisfied.

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Ah, My Fair Lady! I saw that in a roadshow presentation at the Egyptian Theatre (I believe) in Hollywood. I was very impressed with the entrance to the theatre -- maybe moreso than the movie itself? I think I drove everyone crazy, singing "All I want is a room somewhere; lots of chocolates for me to eat" for days after that. My young tyke years...

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Kathie, I don't know if you still live in the Cleveland area, but the Palace Theatre in Playhouse Square downtown shows classic films for 2 weeks every August on the big screen with a live organist playing before the movie. The giant organ rises out of the orchestra pit and it is awesome. We are so lucky in Cleveland that these beautiful old movie palaces were restored, even though they are mainly used for touring shows and concerts and such.

 

This August they will be showing SABRINA, EASY RIDER, THE FRENCH CONNECTION, ROCKY, CASABLANCA, DOCTOR ZHIVAGO, MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL, THE MUPPET MOVIE, TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD, WEST SIDE STORY.

Sandy K

 

Message was edited by:

sandykaypax

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> I read your reply a couple of days ago and can't seem

> to get it out of my mind!! The person was an

> insensitive jerk and I'm sorry that you and your

> family had to hear that!! I wish I could say more!!!!

>

> TOOMANYNOTES

 

Sorry it's taking a long time to get back here. I should have told the rest of the story. I wanted to disappear not for me, but for my mother. Mom looked liked she had been slapped in the face. The woman who said it was a little white hair lady of the south. I remember her eyes where that cold blue color. I thought my father was going to deck her but instead my mother cussed her out in 4 languages, one of which was English so the old lady did get her drift. My dad winked at me and said "she's taking care of it" It's too bad the old biddy didn't see my mother crying through the whole movie. After we got to the car and recovered from mom's stunning performance, my siblings and I where trying to figure out what new words we had learned. My mother when she cooled off tried to turn it into a learning experience about human relations later on, but I know she fumed for a long time over it. I like to think it made me a little tougher and stronger.

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I hope it was a learning experience for the white haired female, too. I'm sorry your family had to endure that, Rainee.

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> I hope it was a learning experience for the white

> haired female, too. I'm sorry your family had to

> endure that, Rainee.

 

Thanks, LuckyDan. I sometimes hope she's in the lowest level of Hell, but I try not to carry a grudge. LOL

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Well, this is a first for me since I joined the forum...it took me thirty minutes of reading from other threads and going back and forth before I finally became enthused about this one, it brought back such a warm memory....My most memorable theater experience would be when I was propped up on the hood of my father's golden 1967 FORD MERCURY ( I loved that car !)on top of a plush quilt eating popcorn with him at the drive- in theatre back in Houston...You might ask, "What was playing?".......I didn't care much for it then,but, then again, I was only 5 yrs. old,"Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid".My father passed away in 1981 when I was only 17 and I've missed him more each day.That movie is now a part of my collection,a connection to the past and present,another cherished memory.

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You sparked a memory for me as well, Ms. 64. I've never been to a Drive-In. I feels as if I've been deprived of a special piece of Americana; a facet of popular culture that defined an age. But I do remember when I was in the car with my parents and we drove past a Drive-In that was playing Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. The scene on the screen was when Katherine Ross was scantily clad on the bicycle (cue music: "Raindrops Are Falling On My Head"). My mother was aghast at this scene because Ms. Ross was on-screen in her bloomers. Imagine what she'd see if Drive-Ins were still popular today!

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It's been a while since we've been on at the same time, hasn't it?You caught me quite sentimental tonight.If you never had the oppurtunity to go to a drive-in theater I really feel like you missed out on something magical. I don't know if it was because the only times my parents weren't fighting was when we made those outings or if it was just the whole scene, the familiarity of being in your own car, the thermos of coffee (which was always snuck in,along with corn dogs here and there),the smell of the hot dogs from the concession stand about 10 yards back, not to mention the frito pies, THE HOT CHOCOLATE!YUMMY! All this to a backdrop of a million stars both on the screen and in the sky,and in the fall we were bundled up with our grandmother's old quilt.I'm glad I had this memory tonight.It gave me a warm feeling.

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I went to a drive-in theatre one last time in 1983 to see The Outsiders. It was neat, because there was a drive-in theatre scene in the movie, so we all sat in the drive-in watching people sit in a drive-in watching a movie.

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Ayres,

 

Your drive-in theater remembrance is sort of like, "what would John Malkovich see if John Malkovich was looking through the eyes of John Malkovich?" The producers of "Being John Malkovich" got the answer to the question correct--"a whole lot of John Malkovichs."

 

I finally remember a movie theater experience worth a short message. I was a child. Every Saturday morning the local dairy had a "Watts-Hardy free movie". Bring an empty Watts-Hardy milk carton and be under sixteen years of age and get in free. The theater was always packed with children. The ambience of the packed theater was similar to one of those Warner Brothers--"gangster in the slammer in the mess hall" scenes. You know, all the inmates are gathered to eat...one gets **** off and bangs his cup...all the other inmates join in and food starts flying. Well, Saturday morning Watts-Hardy movie was exactly like the "big house" riot scene. Including, the theater manager (warden) would walk out onto the stage in front of the screen and say, "I won't start the movie until everyone in this theater gets back in their seats and stops talking and throwing candy!!" Every patron complies. The movie starts. A few minutes pass. Something flys through the air. Two things fly through the air. Several things fly through the air. The movie stops. The lights come on. The manager is back on stage. The warning. The lights go out. The movie starts. And so on. Oh, what great memories.

 

I thought of one other "most memorable moment". Someone mentioned the beginning of "Star Wars" as a very memorable experience. I agree. I would like to add...the first time everyone at the showing of "Star Wars" heard glorious Dolby stereo. How do I know it was the first time the audience had heard Dolby stereo? All thirty of us in the theater gasped at the wall shaking rumble as the space ship appeared at the top of the screen. An audience of thirty people? Well, it was the second showing...of the first day...of the first run...of "Star Wars".

 

Rusty

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My most memorable theater

> experience would be when I was propped up on the hood

> of my father's golden 1967 FORD MERCURY ( I loved

> that car !)on top of a plush quilt eating popcorn

> with him at the drive- in theatre back in

 

Cinemabuff64, did your parents make you wear your pajamas when you went to a drive in? We always did because we where asleep before the first movie ended. Just the preparation to get there was exciting...making big bags of home-made popcorn, ice in cooler, sodas, blankets, cold fried chicken. We had an enormous white '66 Ford Custom 500, the size of a boat. We would lay on the hood until the movie started then all get in so we could try to hear the movie on that tiny little speaker with frayed wires. My dad was usually the only one who could hear. He didn't want to park too far in the back because of the "passion pit" couples, but not too close to the front. Not too close to the concession stand because of the lights and people walking in front of the car, but close enough to get to the restroom. I think "The Russians Are Coming" was the first drive in movie that I didn't sleep through. I know how you feel about your dad. My dad was 50 when he died in '78 and I miss him every day.

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I don't think I can recall a memorable movie theater experience except I do remember when I was very young that my family went to the theater and I never could see the film screen if someone tall or wearing a hat sat in front of me. So, I recall putting a big, almost empty tub of popcorn on the seat in front of me and a rather obese, tall woman sat right on the tub of popcorn and sat through the movie like that. I couldn't see a thing and when the film was over, she got up and tub of popcorn was stuck to her butt.

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If it would have been up to me I would have been in my pj's but my mom was a stickler when it came to the way we dressed.Boy do I remember the '66 Ford Custom 500-my next door neighbor had one, it was white with a wine interior,that thing was huge! I always thought he looked so regal driving that thing.We never had a problem with the speakers at the drive-ins,seems the dialogue echoed all through the park.Your Dad died young just like mine, mine was only 48 yrs. old but he was very sick for years.Thank God we have these nice memories.

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> Boy do I remember the '66 Ford Custom

> 500-my next door neighbor had one, it was white with

> a wine interior,that thing was huge!

 

You could rent the trunck out as a studio appartment! Ours had a blue interior with plastic seat covers, of course.

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Seeing Ben-Hur at the Fox Hollywood Theater for a revival in the mid eighties with Chuck Heston signing autographs in the forcourt. Didn't get close enough to get one but the experience of being that close to a cinema legend was quite enough to make the evening memorable. Oh yeah, did I mention seeing that immortal film spread wide and wrap around in a venue that can justly be classified as a "movie palace"?!!

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It was at the New Mayfield Repertory Cinema in Cleveland Ohio in the early 80s. For one admission, you could see a double feature of classic films.

 

They were showing Cukor's "David Copperfield" and Wyler's "Dodsworth." The Cukor film is far more famous than "Dodsworth." Anyway, before the movie started, the NMRC's manager, Sheldon Wigod, went around to everyone in the theater and asked them to stay and see "Dodsworth," it was a great film that they would enjoy. He did this simply because he didn't want us to miss a great film, and I've never forgotten it.

 

Sadly, the NMRC closed in 1985.

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