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The Good the Bad and the Ugly


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To anyone out there who loves westerns:

 

I have usually been against AMC for their commercial break shananigans. But this Saturday (May 10) is the world premier showing of The Good The Bad and the Ugly. Eastwood and Wallach went back into the studio to re-dub their voices. From what I hear you will not be able to watch this on DVD as it is not on the slate for release. I wish that TCM would have picked up the ball to show this but oh well.

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  • 2 years later...

Hi:

I know. When TCM plays a film they usually play the movie as it was released originaly. I saw that AMC debut of The Good the Bad and the Ugly. Did you listen to the soundtrack? Did you notice a different sound effect for everybody's gun? Very different from the original. The new gun sounded too loud and like a cannon for my taste. It was interesting to see the extra footage in the film. I didn' like the Lee Van Cleef dubbing. They could have done a better job. Sounded like he had TB. I could do a better impression of The Bad. Besides the extras really do not add much to the original. The extras with The Bad take away from the character. The best parts are where The Bad meets up with the other two. He is so Bad you don't know how Bad he will be and the gaps inbetween them meeting, you forget about the Bad. Then he shows up again, at a town, prison camp, bombed out cross roads, at the cemetery offering a spade shovel. Long gaps with periodic perfomance is what helps in The Bad's surprise, dramatic performance.

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Eli Wallach is "The Ugly". Tuco, his character, is villainous, but not truly evil, and is, in fact, meant to be the main character in the film according to Eastwood, who said Leone told them that while shooting. Tuco's humanity creeps out in several scenes - the one with his brother, the monk, most memorably, and also in the one where he refuses to talk under torture, and the scene in the gun store - Tuco robs the owner, but doesn't kill him, even though he's a witness and Tuco is a wanted man. Even "Blondie" must see something good in Tuco, since he left him alive and wealthy at the end, instead of just shooting him, or taking the movie and leaving him to die when the cross broke under his feet.

 

Angel Eyes is the truly evil one, calm, coolly rational, a magnificently Satanic performance by Van Cleef.

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I've NEVER cared for foreign made Western films,and I'm NOT a xenophobe or a racist!! John Ford Westerns are the best by far! Non Ford Grade AAA Western include "Red River"(Hawks),"The Gunfighter"(King),and Winchester '73"(A.Mann)

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> To anyone out there who loves westerns:

>

> I have usually been against AMC for their commercial

> break shananigans. But this Saturday (May 10) is the

> world premier showing of The Good The Bad and the

> Ugly. Eastwood and Wallach went back into the studio

> to re-dub their voices. From what I hear you will not

> be able to watch this on DVD as it is not on the

> slate for release. I wish that TCM would have picked

> up the ball to show this but oh well.

 

You got to remember that TCM is doing everything AMC did for almost 15 years- Providing us with commercial free "Old Movies"- AMC was a bit more rigid and no films before 1970 was ever shown until right before they had to go commercial. Actually, the format changed so drastically, I don't think any of the original production staff of AMC is left, I think it is totally new owners. I remember back around 1997 they started having long infomercials interjected between films.

 

It's too bad really, cos a lot of the stuff we see on TCM, some of it originated on AMC. Especially the short which TCM shows about 3 or 4 times a week, about Widescreen: That was originally a short on AMC. The narration is almost verbatim what the version on AMC said about Widescreen- Especially the part about Ben Hur. Ironically, AMC no longer (Or rarely) shows any films in Letterbox

 

So, in one way I am glad that Eastwood and Wallach took the rouble to do this, both of those guys are among my favourite actors, especially "Tuco"- AMC must have been in a unique position to snap up the rights to show this.

 

I hope that in the name of Classic Film that this is released on DVD and/or TCM is allowed to show it.

 

Well, this was shown way back in May and I missed it, maybe TCM can grab this thing for us?

 

Because, although I love the Ford westerns (actually I like the Ford anythings)- I think the Sergio Leone films have a particular place in film history. O like that they are being emulated (Once upon a time in Mexico) and I loved all of Leone's films all the way up to Once Upon A Time in America.

 

One film that could do with a soundtrack rehash is "My Name is Nobody"- Not actually directed by Leone, but he influenced it. That's my favourite of all the Westerns related to some form of Pasta.

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  • 2 years later...

> {quote:title=cigarjoe wrote:}{quote}

> This Western is one of the best, I could watch it 100 times and will always smile.

 

this is the movie that first made me fall in love with clint :x

 

i could probaly also watch it 100+ times and love it every time. B-)

 

and eli wallach is also kinda endearing, how can you not love a guy who says, 'if you gonna shoot, shoot, don't talk!" :P

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> {quote:title=weAponX wrote:}{quote}

> One film that could do with a soundtrack rehash is "My Name is Nobody"- Not actually directed by Leone, but he influenced it. That's my favourite of all the Westerns related to some form of Pasta.

 

According to imdb.com (and of course that may not be completely reliable) Leone did in fact direct that movie, but was not credited for some unexplained reason.

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Die-hard Leone fans probably don't need to be reminded, but The Good the Bad and the Ugly has just been released in blu-ray here in the U.S. and Canada. I expect I'll be watching that fairly soon... :D

 

Now, if they could only release the whole "Dollars" trilogy on blu-ray, that would be beyond awesome. ;)

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I'll go lightly on this film hollywood because it is international cult status with music even better known by young folks than the magnificent 7's theme.Clint and sergio got into an argument during the dubbing of this film and it wasn't until clint did a junket for Pale Rider in italy nearly twenty years later that things really patched up between them.I don't know what the argument was about but some of you will know.I always wanted to believe that in part it was because clint could see patches of logic missing from the content of his lines.Wheter it was watched once or a hundred times and their are folks that have watched it two hundred,I have a problem with one interaction.After blondie is purposely slow in shooting that rope around tuco and they gallop out of town together the next scene is a stretch in logic.Tuco proceeds to rant about how he could feel the devil bite his **** because of that missed shot and blondie reins up.He states that it is getting harder and explains to tuco that the walk back to town is only seventy miles.Seventy miles !!! It took seventy miles for tuco to complain that blondie had better not be missing his shots on those ropes.If a horse weighs a thousand pounds but is carrying two men whose combined weight would be at least 340 pounds.If that horse had a saddle on and saddlebags that would come to 35 pounds.If you count clothes,boots and guns that is over fifteen pounds more.That comes to 390 pounds in the desert with at least 100 degrees heat.The horse if given enough water could only sustain that weight at a two to three mile per hour walk.If he walked eight hours with them both taking turns riding and one of them or both of them walking,it would take three and a half days to make seventy miles.I don't think tuco would have waited three and a half days to say that.Sure an arabian horse trained in endurance can run a hundred miles in one day.But not with 390 pounds on them.You would have never seen such a line as seventy miles back to town in a john ford film.But the spaghetti westerns are a revision of american westerns anyway.

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>>Eli Wallach is "The Ugly". Tuco, his character, is villainous, but not truly evil, and is, in fact, meant to be the main character in the film according to Eastwood, who said Leone told them that while shooting.

 

 

When the film was first released, I went with some friends to see it. We were all surprised as the initial publicity releases did promote Lee Van Cleef as being "the Ugly" and Eli Wallach as "the bad."

 

One scene always puzzles me and I had hoped the longer cut would solve the mystery, no such luck.

 

When taken as prisoners, Tuco says to Blondie "Hey look, there's Angel Eyes."

 

But the film never showed them as meeting previously. Angel Eyes did witness one of the fake hangings, but that was from a distance.

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It's an interesting point you bring up, clore, I never really thought about that. I still have the blu-ray of this movie and I hope to watch it soon, maybe over the weekend, because ideally I'd like to watch the whole Dollars trilogy. I'll see what other interesting things I might notice this time around. ;)

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Quote from Raymie "After blondie is purposely slow in shooting that rope around tuco and they gallop out of town together the next scene is a stretch in logic.Tuco proceeds to rant about how he could feel the devil bite his **** because of that missed shot and blondie reins up.He states that it is getting harder and explains to tuco that the walk back to town is only seventy miles.Seventy miles It took seventy miles for tuco to complain that blondie had better not be missing his shots on those ropes.If a horse weighs a thousand pounds but is carrying two men whose combined weight would be at least 340 pounds.If that horse had a saddle on and saddlebags that would come to 35 pounds.If you count clothes,boots and guns that is over fifteen pounds more.That comes to 390 pounds in the desert with at least 100 degrees heat.The horse if given enough water could only sustain that weight at a two to three mile per hour walk.If he walked eight hours with them both taking turns riding and one of them or both of them walking,it would take three and a half days to make seventy miles.I don't think tuco would have waited three and a half days to say that.Sure an arabian horse trained in endurance can run a hundred miles in one day.But not with 390 pounds on them.You would have never seen such a line as seventy miles back to town in a john ford film.But the spaghetti westerns are a revision of american westerns anyway."

 

I NEVER believed that Blondie meant the same town they just left for the same reason you pointed out. That equally doesn't make any sense when you think about it, why would Tuco even remotely consider going back to the same town he was just strung up in. It has to mean the next nearest town is 70 miles away.

 

It all could come down to a flub in the dubbing. Another point of discussion is the lines of Clint's dialog in the bombed out town just before he teams up with Tuco.

 

Clint has a kitten in his hat and is with Angel Eyes and his gang in a bombed out building Tuco has entered a destroyed Hotel and is taking a bath, one armed Al Mulock enters and Tuco shoots him saying the "If You got to shoot shoot don't talk."

 

Now all through the film whenever Tuco shoots anyone its with a 5:1 cadence, five shots a pause then the last shot, when Clint dubs "every gun has its own tune" he is actually referring to Tuco's cadence not the sound of the Colt. What he actually said if you read his lips (or go by the Italian script) is "five to one and perfect timing little one" (little one refers to the kitten). But, and here is the interesting part, there is an omission in the sound effects you only hear four shots, but if you watch closely you see five flashes. Tthe one missing is a flash that you see behind the bat wing door of the bath area. So perhaps the line was changed to "every gun has its own tune" since "five to one" would make no sense.

 

Message was edited by: cigarjoe

 

Message was edited by: cigarjoe

 

Message was edited by: cigarjoe

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One thing i forgot to mention upon the initial publicity for the release of The Big Gundown they had stenciled in the streets of NYC that "Mr. Ugly was coming to town" of course United Artists getting it wrong again.

 

It all stems from the original title being different in Italian where "Il Buono, Il Brutto, Il Cattivo" sounds better which directly translates as "The Good, The Ugly, The Bad"

 

Message was edited by: cigarjoe

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I broke out the equivalent of a fine aged wine today, something that I don't want to partake of too often but, when abstained from for a good amount of time, and then sampled, hits the senses in a way that defies description.

 

The Good The Bad and The Ugly just gets better with each viewing, and on this particular go around I was intrigued buy a few thoughts one of them being this post

 

Today I really concentrated on a simple yet brilliant sequence that is a part of the overall *Steven's Hacienda* segment or chapter of GBU. It has got two sections, and its all, aside from the soundtrack and sound effects, silently acted. Its similar to the basically silent beginning to Once Upon A Time In the West.

 

*Setenza's/Angle Eye's Approach* (the silent actor movie)

 

We see Antonio Ruiz on the blindfolded donkey riding the water wheel pump, he ducks his head under the support post twice every go round, both donkey & Ruis perform flawlessly, its functional and not Disney cute, Ruiz gets his Leone close up pulling up on the donkey when he first see's Angle Eyes. He jumps off and runs silently into the hacienda.

 

Our first view of Angle Eyes (AE) is his black horse raising a cloud of dust crossing a plowed field, an agent of fate has arrived. We hear the Spanish guitar plucking the tune that forever will be associated with AE "The Bad". Maybe fifty or one hundred years from now we'll know the name of this black horse. This horse alone puts in quite the equine performance.

 

I believe I've read that since Van Cleef's auto accident he had to be helped on a horse, and that he needed a horse that could give him a smooth ride, and that this particular black horse was circus trained, I even think I remember reading that he used this same horse in other of his films. This horse has this wonderful prancing gait, pay attention to it next time.

 

The First *Great Eye/Face Silent Showdown* Sequence

 

This starts as AE dismounts and approaches the hacienda, at the door way we get the John Ford Framing homage of AE in the doorway, the closeup of his face, the auditory clue of Steven's approach, and then the flip side telescopic interior view towards the grain bins. Now begins the silent dialog, Antonio Casas (Stevens) appears with Ruiz his son we get an exchange of looks between AE & Stevens, and the silent dialog between Stevens and Ruiz, with Ruiz expressing both the affirmation of his concern of the stranger and inquiry if the stranger is safe , Stevens returning a look that is both a negative on the safe, and an expression of worry. Ruiz goes to the table and sits to eat.

 

Chelo Alonzo appears and with a frightened facial expression inquires of Stevens what to do, his return look signifying danger causes her to hustle to boy out of the room. AE approaches eyes boring into Stevens, through the length of the hacienda, and sits at the table. The silent showdown begins to see who will talk first, Its two against one, Angel eyes and the fly on his hat brim vs Stevens. Stevens could have demanded of AE what he wanted he could have pulled his gun, but he is both scared and curious like a mouse caught in the gaze of a rattler, (the famous "beady eyed snear" that Van Cleef perfected during his run as a villain in US Westerns), and the stare down extends until Stevens breaks first, spilling way too much information to a still silent Angel Eyes.

 

Just taken by itself its a wonderful bit of what we could call the equivalent of a modern silent movie. People who complain about Leone's films just being music and stares and close ups, have absolutely no conception of true cinematic art. Leone is making full use of of audio and visual artistry to convey a complex emotional scene without any dialog whatsoever.

 

The only way a Western could top this is if the motion picture arts develop a way to convey signals to the olfactory senses in addition to the others.

 

If we could smell..... the air of the Almerian Desert, the stink of Ruis and his donkey, the pheromone laden sweet sweat of Chelo Alonzo, the aroma of the fresh baked bread and the green chili stew, and finally the acrid black powder smoke.

 

Bravo Leone!

 

Edited by: cigarjoe on Dec 3, 2009 2:38 PM

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For those of you not familiar with Chelo Alonzo either, she was the main star at the Folies-Berg?res in Paris, where she was billed as the new Josephine Baker.

 

chelo-alonso05.jpg

 

 

check out a nice little bio here:

http://www.cultsirens.com/alonso/alonso.htm

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