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Werner Herzog films...


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Assuming that you even know who he is, what are your favorite films that he made?

 

I have only seen three so far because they are so rare, but I hope to see much more.

 

Heart of Glass is by far his best, followed by Grizzly Man and Nosferatu - phantom der narch

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'Aguirre, Wrath of God and 'Fitzcarraldo,' both with Klaus Kinski, are obvious choices, but I also like the early experimental films, 'Even Dwarfs Started Small,' 'The Enigma of Kasper Hauser' and 'Fata Morgana.' There are a pair of very affordable box sets featuring his major works available online - highly recommended.

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Werner Herzog films... Assuming that you even know who he is, what are your favorite films that he made?

 

Sure we know who he is! :)Fitzcarraldo is my favorite. I'd love to get ahold of Where the Green Ants Dream...

 

Gonzo said, " I also like the early experimental films, 'Even Dwarfs Started Small'...

 

Wow, seeing Even Dwarfs Started Small was one of my most difficult film experiences ever. I saw it in a packed theatre. I remember sitting dead center in the house and wanting to escape, but it was just so full that it would have been difficult to get out without disturbing a number of people so I endured it. It's been a long time now (though I don't think I'm over the trauma), but as I recall in this movie they crucified a monkey, killed a giraffe, dressed cockroaches in formal wear and performed a wedding ceremony for them... Is this possible, or was it just a bad dream?

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Hi Images in Film,

Herzog's movies aren't all that hard to find everywhere. Have you tried your local library system? Even if a neighborhood library doesn't have a film, you can often receive it as an interlibrary loan. My local library can get everything from 1980's Werner Herzog Eats His Shoe to last year's Grizzly Man, which was fascinating.

 

I especially liked Herzog's commentary on the latter film, "Grizzly Man". I originally watched it because of an interest in animals, but soon became intrigued by that legend in his own mind, Timothy Treadwell, as well. I don't think that Herzog could really decide if he thought that Timothy Treadwell was just another burnt out twinkie or a holy fool--but then, given all that time that he spent with Klaus Kinski, Herzog was certainly a more qualified judge than most of us when it came to admiring and/or evaluating eccentrics. In all seriousness, I particularly liked the fact that Herzog had treated Treadwell's unfortunate companion that last summer, Amie Huguenard, with compassion. Unlike alot of contemporary documentarians, he also approached those who were left in the wake of this tragedy with empathy.

 

I saw Aguirre:the Wrath of God, Heart of Glass and Fitzcarraldo in college and was blown away by their intensity and, of course, Klaus Kinski. I don't envy any of the filmmakers who worked with Kinski, however. Thanks for reminding me of Herzog's career-long sojourn into the extremes of life. It may seem trite to call Herzog unique, but that's the only word that seems to fit this singular filmmaker!

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A very good Herzog film that people seem to have forgotten is "The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser" sometimes titled "Every Man for Himself and God Against All." It is based on a real incident in 19th Century Germany in which a man who did not know how to speak suddenly showed up in a German village. To me this is a Herzog film with far more emotional connection than usual. "Augierre" is a great film as well, and "Fitzcarraldo" is far better than the American reviews it first got would indicate.

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I've only seen a handful from Herzog..."Fitzcarraldo," "Nosferatu," and "Stroszek..."

I do like his style and Klaus Kinski is one intense actor...This was observed in a pretty good documentary from Les Blank-"Burden Of Dreams-"about the nightmare in making "Fitzcarraldo."

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ImagesInfilm,

 

I just sent Herzog's "Strozek" back to Netflix. The movie was okay, I really liked the actress Eva Mattes (she was the lead actress--"Eva"). "Strozek" is a bunch of distinct vignettes strung together with a loose narrative. I like a movie to have a story, so I was not impressed with the structure of "Strozek". I liked Eva Mattes. Another problem with the movie was casting non-professional actors in the movie. Using amateurs for speaking roles sometimes works (I guess), but not in "Strozek". Did I mention I liked the actress Eva Mattes?

 

One strange thing about "Strozek" was mentioned as part of the supplementary DVD material. The DVD has some pretty good extra stuff. A lot of "Strozek" was filmed in Plainfield, Wisconsin...home of the psycho Ed Gein. Before "Strozek" was conceived, Herzog and the documentary filmmaker Errol Morris hatched a plan to dig up the grave of Ed Gein's mother (located in Plainfield)...on the sly. Herzog showed up at the agreed upon time and place, Mr. Morris did not. The reason why they wanted to dig up Gein's mother's grave is not made very clear, but you can read about the incident if you rent, or buy, the DVD. Strange story and strange people (Morris and Herzog).

 

Rusty

 

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jarhfive

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  • 1 month later...

Moira, I hadn't realized that Grizzly Man was a Herzog film. I read a great article in Vanity Fair about Timothy Treadwell (the Grizzly Man) before the film was made. He was either crazy or supremely optimistic and/or naive about the behavior of grizzly bears.

 

I'll stick with having a cat, thank you!

 

Sandy K

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> He was either crazy or supremely optimistic and/or naive

 

That's an excellent description of the character Herzog is consistently drawn to, both for his documentaries and his fictional films. Jean Renoir said, "A director makes only one movie in his life. Then he breaks it into pieces and makes it again." That's certainly true for Herzog.

 

DavidE

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