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Films of 2016

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"Moonlight," the acclaimed drama about the life and hard times of a poor, gay black man, dominated the 32nd annual Film Independent Spirit Awards on Saturday, winning five competitive awards. In addition to claiming honors for Best Feature, Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Cinematography and Best Editing, "Moonlight" received the previously announced Robert Altman Award for Best Ensemble Cast.

 

The Spirit Awards traditionally are held the day before the annual Academy Awards ceremony.

 

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The cast of "Moonlight" accepts the special Robert Altman Award on Saturday
 
The complete list of winners is as follows:
 
BEST FEATURE
(Presented to producers, not executive producers)
 
"Moonlight," Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Adele Romanski
 
BEST FIRST FEATURE
(Award given to the director and producer)
 
"The Witch," Robert Eggers (director); Daniel Bekerman, Jay Van Hoy, Lars Knudsen, Jodi Redmond, Rodrigo Teixeira (producers)
 
JOHN CASSAVETES AWARD
Given to the best feature made for under $500,000. Award given to the writer, director and producer. Executive Producers are not awarded.
 
"Spa Night," Andrew Ahn (writer-director); David Ariniello, Giulia Caruso, Ki Jin Kim, Kelly Thomas (producers)
 
BEST DIRECTOR
Barry Jenkins, "Moonlight"
 
BEST SCREENPLAY
"Moonlight," written by Barry Jenkins; story by Tarell Alvin McCraney
 
BEST FIRST SCREENPLAY
"The Witch," written by Robert Eggers
 
BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
"Moonlight," James Laxton
 
BEST EDITING
"Moonlight," Joi McMillon, Nat Sanders
 
BEST FEMALE LEAD
Isabelle Huppert, "Elle"
 
BEST MALE LEAD
Casey Affleck, "Manchester by the Sea"
 
BEST SUPPORTING FEMALE
Molly Shannon, "Other People"
 
BEST SUPPORTING MALE
Ben Foster, "Hell or High Water"
 
ROBERT ALTMAN AWARD
(Given to one film’s director, casting director and ensemble cast)
 
"Moonlight," Barry Jenkins (director); Yesi Ramirez (casting director); Mahershala Ali, Patrick Decile, Naomie Harris, Alex Hibbert, André Holland, Jharrel Jerome, Janelle Monáe, Jaden Piner,
Trevante Rhodes, Ashton Sanders (ensemble cast)
 
BEST DOCUMENTARY
(Given to the director and producer)
 
"O.J.: Made in America," Ezra Edelman (director-producer); Nina Krstic, Tamara Rosenberg, Caroline Waterlow (producers)
 
BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM
(Given to the director)
 
"Toni Erdmann," Maren Ade (Germany and Romania)
 
20th ANNUAL PIAGET PRODUCERS AWARD
(Honors emerging producers who, despite highly limited resources, demonstrate the creativity, tenacity and vision required to produce quality, independent films. The award includes a $25,000 unrestricted grant funded by Piaget.)
 
Jordana Mollick
 
23rd ANNUAL KIEHL’S SOMEONE TO WATCH AWARD
(Recognizes a talented filmmaker of singular vision who has not yet received appropriate recognition. The award includes a $25,000 unrestricted grant funded by Kiehl’s Since 1851.)
 
Anna Rose Holmer, director of "The Fits"
 
22nd TRUER THAN FICTION AWARD
(Presented to an emerging director of non-fiction features who has not yet received significant recognition. The award includes a $25,000 unrestricted grant.)
 
Nanfu Wang, director of "Hooligan Sparrow"
 
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Continued from the previous section:
 
2. In one of the most famous scenes from "The Godfather" (1972), an Oscar is clearly visible in the bedroom of Hollywood producer Jack Woltz (John Marley). This is a rare example of a gold statuette's appearance in a film that went on to win the award for Best Picture.
 
 
 
1. The 1954 romantic comedy "Susan Slept Here" is likely the only motion picture ever narrated by an Oscar. The statuette's voice was provided by Art Gilmore, the longtime announcer for "The Red Skelton Hour" and voiceover artist for scores of Hollywood movie trailers.
 
 
There's a cute scene in the movie when the teen houseguest Susan Landis (Debbie Reynolds) cracks nuts with the Oscar won by screenwriter Mark Christopher (Dick Powell). He is not pleased.
 
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The film was nominated for two Academy Awards: Best Original Song ("Hold My Hand" by Jack Lawrence and Richard Myers) and Best Sound, Recording (John Aalberg).
 
 
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Continued from the previous section:

 

5. Bette Davis received a Best Actress nomination for her performance as Maggie Elliot, a declining Hollywood celebrity in "The Star" (1952). Davis enjoyed telling people that the character she played was based on her rival Joan Crawford. One of the screenwriters of "The Star" was Crawford's former friend Katherine Albert. Interestingly, Crawford also was nominated for Best Actress that year for her performance in "Sudden Fear."

 

In a memorable scene from "The Star," Maggie grabs her Academy Award and takes it for a night out on the town.

 


 

4.  In "The Road to Bali" (1952), the characters played by Bing Crosby, Bob Hope and Dorothy Lamour get a glimpse of Humphrey Bogart pulling The African Queen through jungle waters. It leads to a humorous reference to Hope's long-running gags about never winning an Oscar. 

 


 


3. In William A. Wellman's 1937 drama "A Star Is Born," the Oscar acceptance speech of actress Vicki Lester (Janet Gaynor) is ruined by the interruption of her drunken, has-been actor-husband Norman Maine (Fredric March). Gaynor, who won the first-ever Best Actress Oscar in 1929, was nominated again for this film. March received a Best Actor nod.

 


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An Academy Awards disaster also is a feature of George Cukor's 1954 musical remake of "A Star Is Born." James Mason plays Maine, who inadvertently strikes his wife Vicki (Judy Garland) during her acceptance speech at a live Oscars telecast. Garland received a Best Actress nomination for her performance, but lost to Grace Kelly of "The Country Girl."

 


Star+is+Born+Garland.jpg

 

Continued in the next section:


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Some things to consider before the 89th Academy Awards ceremony, which begins tonight at 8:30 Eastern Standard Time on ABC: 

 

Sometimes it seems as if there've been Academy Awards references in films for almost as long as Academy Awards have been presented to films. Here's a countdown of some of my favorite Oscar moments in motion pictures:

 

10. In the 1997 comedy "In & Out," actor Cameron Drake (Matt Dillon) wins an Oscar and offers thanks to an influential high school teacher (Kevin Kline). "And he's gay," Drake tells the worldwide viewing audience. But complications ensue back in the actor's Indiana hometown because the teacher isn't gay, The film is said to have been inspired by Tom Hanks' 1994

Best Actor acceptance speech for "Philadelphia" during which he mentioned two gay figures from his high school days -- a drama teacher and a classmate. Joan Cusack received a Best Supporting Actress nomination for her performance in this film. Dillon later received a Best Supporting Actor nod for his work as a complicated L.A. police officer in the 2005 Best Picture winner, "Crash." Debbie Reynolds, who will be mentioned again in this survey, appears as Kline's mother.

 


 



9. The 1987 satire "Hollywood Shuffle" stars producer-co-writer-director Robert Townsend as black actor Bobby Taylor, who dreams of overcoming movie stereotypes and winning Academy Awards someday. But Townsend's efforts in financing the film were downright nightmarish. He reportedly piled up $40,000 in charges, using 15 personal credit cards before he could find a distributor for his project. "Hollywood Shuffle" eventually earned more than $5 million at the domestic box office.

 

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8. In the 1981 screen biography "Mommie Dearest," Joan Crawford (Faye Dunaway, below with Mara Hobel as daughter Christina) feigns an illness on Oscar night in 1946. She learns about her Best Actress win for "Mildred Pierce" at home while listening to the Academy Awards ceremony on the radio. Dunaway, who won the 1976 Best Actress award for "Network," became the first Oscar winner to portray one in a motion picture.

 

mommie-fakecheer.jpg


 


7. In "The Oscar" (1966), Stephen Boyd plays a Hollywood heel named Frank Fane who wants an Academy Award so bad, he can almost taste it. Never mind the fact that almost everyone he knows in the audience hates his guts. In real life, the actor from Northern Ireland never received an Oscar nomination -- not even for his performance as the menacing Messala in "Ben-Hur" (1959).


 

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6. Neil Simon's 1978 screen comedy "California Suite" features Dame Maggie Smith as a character much like herself. As the British actress Diana Barrie, she is nominated for an Academy Award, but doesn't win. In a nice twist, Smith received the Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance in the film. Smith became the first of four consecutive actresses with the initials M.S. to win the category. There would be a fifth at the 1996 Oscars.


 

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Continued in the next section:



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Continued from the previous section:

 

 

 Best Cinematography: 

  • "Arrival," Bradford Young
  • "La La Land," Linus Sandgren
  • "Lion," Greig Fraser
  • "Moonlight," James Laxton
  • "Silence," Rodrigo Prieto

Best Production Design: 


  • "Arrival" -- Patrice Vermette (production design); Paul Hotte (set decoration)
  • "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them" -- Stuart Craig (production design); Anna Pinnock (set decoration)
  • "Hail, Caesar!" -- Jess Gonchor (production design); Nancy Haigh (set decoration)
  • "La La Land" -- David Wasco (production design); Sandy Reynolds-Wasco (set decoration)
  • "Passengers" -- Hendrix Dyas (production design); Gene Serdena (set decoration)
Best Costume Design: 

  • "Allied," Joanna Johnston
  • "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," Colleen Atwood
  • "Florence Foster Jenkins," Consolata Boyle
  • "Jackie," Madeline Fontaine
  • "La La Land," Mary Zophres
 

Best Makeup and Hairstyling: 

  • "A Man Called Ove," Eva von Bahr and Love Larson
  • "Star Trek Beyond," Joel Harlow and Richard Alonzo
  • "Suicide Squad," Alessandro Bertolazzi, Giorgio Gregorini and Christopher Nelson

Best Film Editing:



  • "Arrival," Joe Walker
  • "Hacksaw Ridge," John Gilbert
  • "Hell or High Water," Jake Roberts
  • "La La Land," Tom Cross

  • "Moonlight," Nat Saunders and Joi McMillon





Best Visual Effects:




  • "Deepwater Horizon," Craig Hammack, Jason Snell, Jason Billington and Burt Dalton
  • "Doctor Strange," Stephane Ceretti, Richard Bluff, Vincent Cirelli and Paul Corbould
  • "The Jungle Book," Robert Legato, Adam Valdez, Andrew R. Jones and Dan Lemmon
  • "Kubo and the Two Strings," Steve Emerson, Oliver Jones, Brian McLean and Brad Schiff

  • "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story," John Knoll, Mohen Leo, Hal Hickel and Neil Corbould





Best Sound Editing:




  • "Arrival," Sylvain Bellemare
  • "Deepwater Horizon," Wylie Stateman and Renée Tondelli
  • "Hacksaw Ridge," Robert Mackenzie and Andy Wright
  • "La La Land," Ai-Ling Lee and Mildred Iatrou Morgan
  • "Sully," Alan Robert Murray and Bub Asman

 

Best Sound Mixing:



  • "Arrival," Bernard Gariépy Strobl and Claude La Haye



  • "Hacksaw Ridge," Kevin O’Connell, Andy Wright, Robert Mackenzie and Peter Grace


  • "La La Land," Andy Nelson, Ai-Ling Lee and Steve A. Morrow
  • "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story," David Parker, Christopher Scarabosio and Stuart Wilson

  • "13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi," Greg P. Russell (nomination rescinded), Gary Summers, Jeffrey J. Haboush and Mac Ruth






 








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Continued from the previous section:

 

 

 Best Animated Feature: 

  • "Kubo and the Two Strings," Travis Knight and Arianne Sutner
  • "Moana," John Musker, Ron Clements and Osnat Shurer
  • "My Life As a Zucchini," Claude Barras and Max Karli
  • "The Red Turtle," Michael Dudok de Wit and Toshio Suzuki
  • "Zootopia," Byron Howard, Rich Moore and Clark Spencer
Best Foreign Language Film: 

  • "Land of Mine" (Denmark)
  • "A Man Called Ove" (Sweden)
  • "The Salesman" (Iran)
  • "Tanna" (Australia)
  • "Toni Erdmann" (Germany)
Best Documentary Feature: 

  • "Fire at Sea," Gianfranco Rosi and Donatella Palermo
  • "I Am Not Your Negro," Raoul Peck, Rémi Grellety and Hébert Peck
  • "Life, Animated," Roger Ross Williams and Julie Goldman
  • "O.J.: Made in America," Ezra Edelman and Caroline Waterlow
  • "13th," Ava DuVernay, Spencer Averick and Howard Barish
Best Documentary Short Subject: 

  • "Extremis," Dan Krauss
  • "4.1 Miles," Daphne Matziaraki
  • "Joe’s Violin," Kahane Cooperman and Raphaela Neihausen
  • "Watani: My Homeland," Marcel Mettelsiefen and Stephen Ellis
  • "The White Helmets," Orlando von Einsiedel and Joanna Natasegara
Best Live Action Short Film:


  • "Ennemis Intérieurs," Sélim Azzazi
  • "La Femme et le TGV," Timo von Gunten and Giacun Caduff
  • "Silent Nights," Aske Bang and Kim Magnusson
  • "Sing," Kristof Deák and Anna Udvardy

  • "Timecode," Juanjo Giménez




Best Animated Short Film:



  • "Blind Vaysha," Theodore Ushev
  • "Borrowed Time," Andrew Coats and Lou Hamou-Lhadj
  • "Pear Cider and Cigarettes," Robert Valley and Cara Speller
  • "Pearl," Patrick Osborne

  • "Piper," Alan Barillaro and Marc Sondheimer




Best Original Score



  • "Jackie," Mica Levi
  • "La La Land," Justin Hurwitz
  • "Lion," Dustin O’Halloran and Hauschka
  • "Moonlight," Nicholas Britell

  • "Passengers," Thomas Newman



Best Original Song



  • "Audition (The Fools Who Dream)" from "La La Land" -- Justin Hurwitz (music); Benj Pasek and Justin Paul (lyrics)



  • "Can’t Stop The Feeling" from "Trolls" -- Justin Timberlake, Max Martin and Karl Johan Schuster (music and lyrics) 


  • "City Of Stars" from "La La Land" --  Justin Hurwitz (music); Benj Pasek and Justin Paul (lyrics)
  • "The Empty Chair" from "Jim: The James Foley Story" -- J. Ralph and Sting (music and lyrics)

  • "How Far I'll Go" from "Moana" -- Lin-Manuel Miranda (music and lyric)





Continued in the next section:

 

 







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The annual Academy Awards ceremony wouldn't be the same without a little controversy. This year's to-do occurred on the eve of tonight's event.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Saturday that it had rescinded the nomination of sound mixer Greg P. Russell for campaigning against the rules. Russell, who had been 0-for-16 in overall nominations, was cited in the Best Sound Mixing category for the action film "13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi." The picture's other nomiinees -- Gary Summers, Jeffrey J. Haboush and Mac Ruth -- are still eligible.

 

 

"The decision was prompted by the discovery that Russell had called his fellow members of the sound branch during the nominations phase to make them aware of his work on the film, in direct violation of a campaign regulation that prohibits telephone lobbying," the Academy said in a statement.

 

 

Meanwhile, "La La Land," director Damien Chazelle's revival of the movie musical, leads all Oscar contenders with 14 nominations -- including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor and Best Actress. The film tied the record for most Oscar nominations, also held by "All About Eve" (1950) and "Titanic" (1997).

 

 

Other films with multiple nominations: "Arrival" and "Moonlight" (eight apiece), "Hacksaw Ridge," "Lion" and "Manchester by the Sea" (six each), "Fences" and "Hell or High Water" (four apiece) and "Hidden Figures" and "Jackie" (three each).

 

 

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Jimmy Kimmel serves as the host of ABC's Oscars telecast for the first time

 

The 89th annual Academy Awards will be televised by ABC tonight at 8:30 p.m. Here are the nominees in all categories:

 Best Picture: 

  • "Arrival," Shawn Levy, Dan Levine, Aaron Ryder and David Linde, producers (Paramount Pictures)
  • "Fences," Scott Rudin, Denzel Washington and Todd Black, producers (Paramount Pictures)
  • "Hacksaw Ridge," Bill Mechanic and David Permut, producers (Pandemonium Films)
  • "Hell or High Water," Carla Hacken and Julie Yorn, producers (CBS Films)
  • "Hidden Figures," Donna Gigliotti, Peter Chernin, Jenno Topping, Pharrell Williams and Theodore Melfi, producers (20th Century Fox)
  • "La La Land," Fred Berger, Jordan Horowitz and Marc Platt, producers (Lionsgate)
  • "Lion," Emile Sherman, Iain Canning and Angie Fielder, producers (The Weinstein Company)
  • "Manchester by the Sea," Matt Damon, Kimberly Steward, Chris Moore, Lauren Beck and Kevin J. Walsh, producers (Amazon Studios/Roadside)
  • "Moonlight," Adele Romanski, Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner, producers (A24)
 
Best Director: 
 
  • Damien Chazelle, "La La Land"
  • Mel Gibson, "Hacksaw Ridge"
  • Barry Jenkins, "Moonlight"
  • Kenneth Lonergan, "Manchester by the Sea"
  • Dennis Villeneuve, "Arrival"
 
Best Actor: 
 
  • Casey Affleck, "Manchester by the Sea"
  • Andrew Garfield, "Hacksaw Ridge"
  • Ryan Gosling, "La La Land"
  • Viggo Mortensen, "Captain Fantastic"
  • Denzel Washington, "Fences"
 
Best Actress: 
 
 
  • Isabelle Huppert, "Elle"
  • Ruth Negga, "Loving"
  • Natalie Portman, "Jackie"
  • Emma Stone, "La La Land"
  • Meryl Streep, "Florence Foster Jenkins"
 
Best Supporting Actor: 
 
  • Mahershala Ali, "Moonlight"
  • Jeff Bridges, "Hell or High Water"
  • Lucas Hedges, "Manchester by the Sea"
  • Dev Patel, "Lion"
  • Michael Shannon, "Nocturnal Animals"
Best Supporting Actress: 
 
  • Viola Davis, "Fences" 
  • Naomie Harris, "Moonlight"
  • Nicole Kidman, "Lion"
  • Octavia Spencer, "Hidden Figures"
  • Michelle Williams, "Manhattan by the Sea"
 
 
 
Best Original Screenplay
 
 
  • "Hell or High Water," written by Taylor Sheridan
  • "La La Land," written by Damien Chazelle
  • "The Lobster," written by Yorgos Lanthimos, Efthimis Filippou
  • "Manchester by the Sea," written by Kenneth Lonergan 
  • "20th Century Women," written by Mike Mills
 
Best Adapted Screenplay
 
  • "Arrival," screenplay by Eric Heisserer; based on the 1998 novella “Story of Your Life” by Ted Chiang
  • "Fences," screenplay by August Wilson (posthumous); based on his 1987 play  
  • "Hidden Figures," screenplay by Allison Schroeder and Theodore Melfi; based on the 2016 nonfiction book "Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race" by Margot Lee Shetterly
  • "Lion," screenplay by Luke Davies; adapted from the 2014 nonfiction book “A Long Way Home” by Saroo Brierley
  • "Moonlight," written by Barry Jenkins; based on a story by Tarell McCraney
 
 
 
Continued in the next section:
 
 

 

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Alicia Vikander, last year's Best Supporting Actress winner, will present first  


 


Here is the official order of the presentations at the 89th Academy Awards:


 


1. Actor in a Supporting Role


 


2. Costume Design


 


3. Makeup and Hairstyling


 


4. Documentary Feature


 


5. Sound Editing


 


6. Sound Mixing


 


7. Actress in a Supporting Role


 


8. Foreign Language Film


 


9. Animated Short Film


 


10. Animated Feature


 


11. Production Design


 


12. Visual Effects


 


13. Film Editing


 


14. Live Action Short Film


 


15. Documentary Short Subject


 


16. Cinematography


 


17. Original Score


 


18. Original Song


 


19. Original Screenplay


 


20. Adapted Screenplay


 


21. Directing


 


22. Actor in a Leading Role


 


23. Actress in a Leading Role


 


24. Best Picture


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Here is a complete list of winners from the 89th Academy Awards ceremony held Sunday night at the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood: 

 Best Picture: 

  • "Moonlight,"  Adele Romanski, Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner, producers (A24)
 
Best Director: 
 
  • Damien Chazelle, "La La Land"
 
Best Actor: 
 
  • Casey Affleck, "Manchester by the Sea"
 
Best Actress: 
 
  • Emma Stone, "La La Land"
 
Best Supporting Actor: 
 
  • Mahershala Ali, "Moonlight"
 
Best Supporting Actress: 
 
  • Viola Davis, "Fences" 
 

Best Original Screenplay

  • "Manchester by the Sea," written by Kenneth Lonergan
 
Best Adapted Screenplay
 
  • "Moonlight," written by Barry Jenkins; based on a story by Tarell McCraney
 
 Best Animated Feature: 
 
  • "Zootopia," Byron Howard, Rich Moore and Clark Spencer
 
Best Foreign Language Film: 
 
  • "The Salesman" (Iran)
 
Best Documentary Feature: 
 
  • "O.J.: Made in America," Ezra Edelman and Caroline Waterlow
 
Best Documentary Short Subject: 
 
  • "The White Helmets," Orlando von Einsiedel and Joanna Natasegara
 
Best Live Action Short Film:
 
  • "Sing," Kristof Deák and Anna Udvardy
 
 
Best Animated Short Film:
 
  • "Piper," Alan Barillaro and Marc Sondheimer
 
 
Best Original Score
 
  • "La La Land," Justin Hurwitz
 
Best Original Song
 
  • "City Of Stars" from "La La Land" --  Justin Hurwitz (music); Benj Pasek and Justin Paul (lyrics) 
 
Best Cinematography: 
 
  • "La La Land," Linus Sandgren
 
Best Production Design: 
 
  • "La La Land" -- David Wasco (production design); Sandy Reynolds-Wasco (set decoration)
 
Best Costume Design: 
 
  • "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," Colleen Atwood
 
Best Makeup and Hairstyling: 
 
  • "Suicide Squad," Alessandro Bertolazzi, Giorgio Gregorini and Christopher Nelson
 
Best Film Editing:
 
  • "Hacksaw Ridge," John Gilbert
 
Best Visual Effects:
 
  • "The Jungle Book," Robert Legato, Adam Valdez, Andrew R. Jones and Dan Lemmon
 
Best Sound Editing:
 
  • "Arrival," Sylvain Bellemare
 
Best Sound Mixing:
 
  • "Hacksaw Ridge," Kevin O’Connell, Andy Wright, Robert Mackenzie and Peter Grace
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Some notes on the 89th Academy Awards ceremony, which ran three hours and 49 minutes -- much longer than the hour and 51-minute running time of the Best Picture winner, "Moonlight." 

The Fake News Award: To Best Picture presenters Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, who somehow led everyone to believe that "La La Land" had won the top Oscar. The actual winner: "Moonlight." The announcement was corrected about two-and-a-half minutes later -- after "La La Land" producers Jordan Horowitz, Marc Platt and Fred Berger had already delivered acceptance speeches.

In all fairness, it appears that Beatty was handed a duplicate envelope for the Best Actress category by a representative of the accounting firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers.
 

The Grace Under Pressure Award: To "La La Land" producer Horowitz, who declared after the mistake was sorted out: "I'm gonna be really proud to hand this to my friends from 'Moonlight' " 

An Oscars Mix-up Flashback: At the sixth annual Academy Awards ceremony on March 16, 1934, the nominees for Best Director were Frank Capra for "Lady for a Day," George Cukor for "Little Women" and Frank Lloyd for "Cavalcade." When presenter Will Rogers announced the winner, he simply declared: "Come up and get it, Frank!" Capra, who thought he had won, rushed to the podium. To his chagrin, he discovered that the actual winner was Lloyd.

But things worked out for Capra. He received the Best Director Oscar a year later for "It Happened One Night" -- and won again for the movies "Mr. Deeds Goes to Town" (1936) and "You Can't Take It with You" (1938).

A Picture Can Tell a Thousand Words: Brie Larson, the 2015 Best Actress winner, stood by impassively after presenting Casey Affleck with the Oscar for Best Actor of 2016. She was asked later if her refusal to applaud the actor's win was related to past sexual misbehavior allegations against him. Her response: "I think that whatever it was that I did onstage kind of spoke for itself," she told Vanity Fair. "I’ve said all that I need to say about that topic."

Larson's Oscar win was for her performance in the drama "Room," in which she played a kidnap victim held captive for seven years.

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Why Emma Stone's Oscar win was a bad sign for "La La Land": It's been 12 years since a recipient of the Best Actress award also appeared in the Best Picture winner. The last time it happened: February 27, 2005, when Hilary Swank won for "Million Dollar Baby." 

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Stone received her Best Actress Oscar from Leonardo DiCaprio

 

Things that should make "La La Land" director Damien Chazelle proud:

  • At the age of 32 years and 38 days old, he became the youngest person ever to win the Best Director Oscar. He broke the 86-year-old record set by Norman Taurog, who was 32 years and 260 days old when he was named Best Director for the film "Skippy" (1930/31).
  • "La La Land" won the most Oscars on Sunday night -- six. It had tied the record for most nominations with 14.
  • Two of his first three films have been nominated for Best Picture. His 2014 drama "Whiplash" was one of the eight nominated pictures at the 87th Academy Awards.
  • He has directed two actors to Oscar wins -- J.K. Simmons (2014 Best Supporting Actor) for "Whiplash" and Emma Stone (2016 Best Actress) for "La La Land."

Image result for damien chazelle oscar winChazelle became the youngest person to win a Best Director Academy Award

 

The 21st time was the charm: Sound mixer Kevin O'Connell, who held the record for the most Academy Award losses without a win (he was 0-for-20), received his first Oscar for the World War II drama "Hacksaw Ridge."

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The veteran sound mixer O'Connell finally wins an Oscar on his 21st nomination

 

#OscarsNotSoWhite update: African-Americans won the Best Supporting Actor and Actress awards -- Mahershala Ali for "Moonlight" and Viola Davis for "Fences." Although he lost the Best Director award to Damien Chazelle of "La La Land," Barry Jenkins became the first African-American to direct a Best Picture winner. He also shared the Best Adapted Screenplay award with Tarell McCraney. As it happens, a black filmmaker has never won the Best Director Oscar.

 

Relax, he's an American citizen: Ali, who was born in Oakland, California, became the first Muslim actor to win an Oscar. He grew up as a Christian, but later converted to the Islamic faith.

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Mahershala Ali won the Best Supporting Actor award for "Moonlight"

 

Anybody got ideas for a spoken word project? Viola Davis' Oscar win for Best Supporting Actress in "Fences" leaves her a Grammy Award shy of attaining EGOT status. She previously won a Tony Award for a 2010 Broadway revival of "Fences" and a 2015 Primetime Emmy Award for her performances in the ABC drama series "How to Get Away with Murder."

image.jpg

Davis is the most-nominated black actress in history with three Oscar nods 

 

The first big upset of the night: Colleen Atwood received the Costume Design award for her contributions to the J.K. Rowling tale "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them." Many observers had expected a win for designer Mary Zophres of "La La Land." It was Atwood's fourth Academy Award win in 12 nominations. She previously won for her designs in "Chicago" (2002), "Memoirs of a Geisha" (2005) and "Alice in Wonderland" (2010).

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Colleen Atwood captured her fourth Academy Award for Best Costume Design

 

One hour and 44 minutes: This is how much time had elapsed at the Academy Awards before "La La Land' won its first award. The Production Design Oscar went to the husband-and-wife team of David Wasco and Sandy Reynolds-Wasco.

 

Remember, the 'E' in ESPN stands for Entertainment: "The Worldwide Sports Leader" picked up its first Academy Award as Ezra Edelman's "O.J.: Made in America" won the Best Documentary Feature category. The 467-minute production -- almost double the running time of Sunday's telecast -- has become the longest Oscar-winning movie ever.

 

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Producer Caroline Waterlow and director Ezra Edelman won Oscars for an ESPN film

 

Thanks, Trump! Although Germany's "Toni Erdmann" won the lion's share of prizes before the Oscars, the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film went to the Iranian entry "The Salesman." It was the second Oscar win in five years for Iran's Asghar Farhadi, whose drama "A Separation" won the category in 2012. Farhadi announced he would not attend the Oscars because of President Trump's executive order suspending entry from some Muslim nations.

 

Fahadi's second Oscar was accepted by Iranian astronaut Anousheh Ansari, who read a statement from the filmmaker. "I'm sorry I'm not with you tonight," Fahadi's statement said. "My absence is out of respect for the people of my country and those of the other six nations who have been disrespected by the inhumane law that bans entry of immigrants to the U.S."

 

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Iranian astronaut Ansari accepted the Oscar for "The Salesman"
 
Posing with the Stars: One of Oscar host Jimmy Kimmel's best bits involved admitting into the Dolby Centre an unsuspecting group of tour bus patrons. The visitors' reactions to being in the company of Meryl Streep, Denzel Washington and Nicole Kidman? Priceless.

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In case you were wondering: The 90th Academy Awards ceremony will be held on Sunday, March 4, 2018.

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I haven't seen Hidden Figures, but I thought Gravity was wildly overrated.

He LawrencA, I see you pout an avatar/pic of my #1 idol Tracy on there. as u know that's something I've been just lousy at for many yrs though?

 

& several have sent me as to how to do this, plus it's on the forums

 

Now, that a much older shot of him, then the (3) the offer I always wanted "Black Rock's"

 

 

LUCKY!

 

I've not been online since last Wednesday or so, so didn't get your views on those *Oscars as yet???

 

THANK YOU

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I've not been online since last Wednesday or so, so didn't get your views on those *Oscars as yet???

 

I thought the Oscars was about average. They've all been rather dull the last few years, ever since all of the preceding awards get so much publicity, so by the time the Oscars rolls around it's fairly obvious what and who will win.

 

I watched the entire, lumbering broadcast, but actually changed the channel right after La La Land was announced as Best Picture. I didn't learn about the snafu until a few hours later when I went online.

 

It is odd that Scorsese's Silence won no Oscars, and Suicide Squad did!

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He LawrencA, I see you pout an avatar/pic of my #1 idol Tracy on there. as u know that's something I've been just lousy at for many yrs though?

 

& several have sent me as to how to do this, plus it's on the forums

 

Now, that a much older shot of him, then the (3) the offer I always wanted "Black Rock's"

 

 

LUCKY!

 

I've not been online since last Wednesday or so, so didn't get your views on those *Oscars as yet???

 

THANK YOU

Lawrence, with the new Avatar! We truly split on Sandy's lean mean science fiction, not a sequence is wasted. & also she looked very nice in the shorts, something the press kidded her abut it. That scene where Clooney comes back is in my opinion their greatest sequence in all of the films they have done yet. But-(no spoiler alert) Plus, like far too many flix nowadays, it never overstayed it's welcome

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Here is a complete list of winners from the 89th Academy Awards ceremony held Sunday night at the Dolby Centre in Hollywood: 

 

AFTER WATCH, STUDPYING & OF COURSE PREDICTING THE OSCARS-(my debut year) I was barely 18 at the time)

 

OUR LAST OSCARS & IN PARTICULARY SMELLED OF SOMETHING FISHY, AS THEY USED TO SATY. Now, I'm posting saying this was as obviously for the 1936 *Oscars which majority of books, sites & more always cite as it's mot rigged & alledgedly over the grave of *Irving G. Thalberg in 1936 & here we go again by L.B. Mayer-(whom in the *AMPAS himself to go against labor unions in the silent era ^ Jack L. Warner) was said to be the other culprit)urprit in this fox fight strike b("FOREST LAWN" GLENDALE, CALIF.) But, ironically it's very first & known by all in Tinsel Town fixed was when Mayer of whom originally had a couple M=G-M) prods in that very year (1927-28) & he really disliked-(see Cannes Film Festival ) & by then LB wanted an *Oscar for rigging the very 1st *Academy Awards He loathed his own factories "The Crowd" So he succumbs & got Universal, MGM & others to cast votes for *"Wings" (Paramount) (**1/2) instead GO=FIGURE & among his most dispicable was qualities was his hatred-(this time) for *Chaplin. & *"The Little Tramp" was at first an official *AMPAS nominee for "The Circus" & in *Oscars debut year too. But, Mayer wasn't about to accept him being the very first Best Actor winner, so he had *Charlie's name removed from competition & *Emil Jannings became his fare hared bout & was the very firtst leading actor winner instead of *Chaplin??? Irony as well, *Jannings thanks people-("Blossom Rm" "Roosevelt Hotel" in 1929 The gave *Chaplin an honorary-(non-completely) special placuqe only though

 

 

THANK YOU

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Best Picture: 

  • "Moonlight,"  Adele Romanski, Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner, producers (A24)
Best Director: 
  • Damien Chazelle, "La La Land"
Best Actor: 
  • Casey Affleck, "Manchester by the Sea"
Best Actress: 
  • Emma Stone, "La La Land"
Best Supporting Actor: 
  • Mahershala Ali, "Moonlight"
Best Supporting Actress: 
  • Viola Davis, "Fences" 
Best Original Screenplay
  • "Manchester by the Sea," written by Kenneth Lonergan
Best Adapted Screenplay
  • "Moonlight," written by Barry Jenkins; based on a story by Tarell McCraney
 Best Animated Feature: 
  • "Zootopia," Byron Howard, Rich Moore and Clark Spencer
Best Foreign Language Film: 
  • "The Salesman" (Iran)
Best Documentary Feature: 
  • "O.J.: Made in America," Ezra Edelman and Caroline Waterlow
Best Documentary Short Subject: 
  • "The White Helmets," Orlando von Einsiedel and Joanna Natasegara
Best Live Action Short Film:
  • "Sing," Kristof Deák and Anna Udvardy
Best Animated Short Film:
  • "Piper," Alan Barillaro and Marc Sondheimer
Best Original Score
  • "La La Land," Justin Hurwitz
Best Original Song
  • "City Of Stars" from "La La Land" --  Justin Hurwitz (music); Benj Pasek and Justin Paul (lyrics)

 Best Cinematography: 
  • "La La Land," Linus Sandgren
Best Production Design: 
  • "La La Land" -- David Wasco (production design); Sandy Reynolds-Wasco (set decoration)
Best Costume Design: 
  • "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them," Colleen Atwood
Best Makeup and Hairstyling: 
  • "Suicide Squad," Alessandro Bertolazzi, Giorgio Gregorini and Christopher Nelson
Best Film Editing:
  • "Hacksaw Ridge," John Gilbert
Best Visual Effects:
  • "The Jungle Book," Robert Legato, Adam Valdez, Andrew R. Jones and Dan Lemmon
(MY 2nd FAVORITE MOVIE OF THEYEAR!)

 

 

 

Best Sound Editing:

  • "Arrival," Sylvain Bellemare
Best Sound Mixing:
  • "Hacksaw Ridge," Kevin O’Connell, Andy Wright, Robert Mackenzie and Peter Grace

 

To Jakeem, if I recall you stayed out of the final prediction thing, right? WHAT A BIZARRO evening on Hollywood, Blvd. I first visited there in April of 1999) & it "The Kodak Theatre"-(680l H. Blvd) or just "Hollywood & Highland" & as you know ironically across H. Blvd from "The Pantages Theatre" & I forget in 2005 if it already changed hands into "Dolby Theatre" or not// I got to take the tour up into auditorium, out side with "The DW Griffith Elephants" Which is astounding! Those they aren't nearly as large as the once's he built for "Intolerance" as you know

 

(NOTE: Hope it ok/cool, I post my overall score below via comparison Immediately le me know if it is not though. This is your analysis (P.S. Kinda' surprised, but I like the outcome in "Hillary's America": getting even more votes then "Batman vs. Superman" I didn't quite think it was bad, or even awful & barely gave it (**-out of four stars) & her docu was playing at the local theatres & did well $$$ wise, but I had no interest

 

Below are what I predicted to win for the 2016 *Academy Awards-(as usual denotes official winner)

 

Best picture: (predix) "La La Land" & most are only talking about that massive chaus at the end, but this may also be the biggest BP upset in 89 years! & all things for over a month or more saw it sweeping 9 to 10)

&

Winner: "Moonlight"> again, a massive up. Back the the 1980's & '90's if a film got or won BP it would immediately get released. It's barely made $25m. (NOTE: To others, who has seen it?)

 

Best Actor: Winner> & I always still kick myself because around 1982 & so -on, my fellow pundit used to always compliain whe we altered/revised a category & I did Swore to always go with 1st instinct & I didn't-(though did a bit better than EW & all it's editors & Tom 0'Neil at godderby.cpom

*Casey Affeck, "Manchester by the Sea"

& my predix: Denzsel, "Fences" I truly thought the well-known uptight *AMPAS would join him in that elite group of 3 or more victors-(performers)

 

Best Actress: Winner> Emma stone, "La Land Land" I told my ma she'd win the *Oscar, soon a leaving the theatre Currenty

ir new "America's Sweetheart" in the '80 & pt of the 90's we had Meg, then Sandy,etc

& my predix, but not officially in contests. the only actress that could upset Stone was 63yr old French actresss Isabelle Huppurt in "Elle"

 

S. Actor: (Almost as easy co call was below S. actress. Marhershela Ai, "Moonlight"

his closest competition was "The Dude" on his 7th nom in "Hell or High water"

 

 

S. Actress: (A BLOW OUT!) for Viola Davis

 

BD: (ALSO A BLOUT OUT!) Damien Chezelle for "La

Land Lade"

 

& both Adapted-screenplay: GT BOTH CORRECT) "Moonlight"

& Original: "Manchester by the Sea"''Jakeem, it that was ok, again lateme know

 

Because like you listing of all 24, I may fill in those blanks couple days

 

 

THANK YOU

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Jakeem did you revise the biggest moneymakers of the 9 BPconters yet?

 

It's ridicluos & I've  find it ridiculous that t":Hidden Figures" is outpacing "La LaLand?

 

 

It was more content then excecution, Even my mom a bona-fide *Coster fan ever sine 1987's "No Way 0ut"  said he was even boring>

 

I know it's impotyant topicin history,butcertaily no "Right Suff" & others?

 

(P.S. Kajeem ever see '83'stremendous"RS?"  My mom had a point back then, when '89's "The Abyss" ($47m.) (***) & introduced by Cameron liquid metal

(TRIVIA/FUN/FACTS:

That Ed Harris is the only acor to have done to the stretches of the sea & outerspace as well

 

& I've been reading 1 critic many yrs & he ducked Harris as "the greatest actor yet to win an *Oscar" unquote

 

Harris is a super actor, but Oscar contender that year above all for the epic was Sam Shepard & also the coolest Type of rile McQueen woulda' loved!!!

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It's been a month since the 89th Academy Awards ceremony, and most of the nominated films are available for viewing on the home market. But here's an update on how the nine Best Picture nominees have fared in theaters.
 
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The "Moonlight" team celebrated its Best Picture win -- after an infamous false start
 
As of March 26, 2017, here are the top-grossing 2016 Best Picture nominees on a domestic basis (according to boxofficemojo.com):
 
1. "Hidden Figures" (20th Century Fox) -- $167,046,872 million. 
2. "La La Land" (Summit Entertainment) -- $150,233,687 million. 
3. "Arrival" (Paramount Pictures) -- $100,546,139 million. 
4. "Hacksaw Ridge" (Summit Entertainment) --$67,209,615 million. 
5. "Fences" (Paramount Pictures) -- $57,641,868 million. 
6. "Lion" (The Weinstein Company) --$50,724,840 million. 
7. "Manchester by the Sea" (Amazon Studios/Roadside Attractions) -- $47,658,644 million.
8. "Moonlight" (A24/Plan B Entertainment) -- $27,694,670 million.
9. "Hell or High Water" (CBS/Lionsgate) -- $27,007,844 million. 
 
The top two films -- "Hidden Figures" and "La La Land" -- have done well overseas, too, but their positions are reversed. "La La Land" has earned $277,100,000 million worldwide for an overall total of $427,333,687. "Hidden Figures" has picked up $53,155,227 million from overseas sources for a worldwide total of $220,202,099 million.
 
The sci-fi thriller "Arrival," only the third Best Picture nominee of the year to earn $100 million domestically, has almost doubled its earnings worldwide. It has taken in $97,458,917 million from foreign markets for an overall total of  $198,005,056.
 
"Moonlight," the 2016 Best Picture winner, was shot in 25 days for $1.5 million. It has earned almost 20 times its original budget. The film has not yet been released overseas.
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On 1/6/2017 at 4:02 AM, Bogie56 said:

After about 30 minutes of viewing this year's Cannes Palme d'Or winner from Ken Loach I, Daniel Blake I was really struck by how dreary it was and almost felt like chucking it in in favour of a superhero movie.  But I'm glad that I stuck it out until the end.  It's the story of a Newcastle labourer nearing retirement age who has suffered a heart attack.  His doctors recommend that he not work but due to errors at his local benefits office he is forced to seek work or receive no financial help.  And so begins his bureaucratic nightmare.  He befriends a young single mother who can barely make ends meet and offers her help where he can.  Hayley Squires plays the young mother and is a standout.  It's typically good Ken Loach.  A dose of real gritty life.

 

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