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LawrenceA

Films of 2016

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I'm looking forward to seeing the new version of THE JUNGLE BOOK, which is a live action movie from Disney.

I love the original Disney animated version and the Korda live action version from 1942.

 

Here's a clip i found of Christopher Walken as King Louie in the new movie performing "I Wanna Be Like You."

 

Supposedly this is from the original soundtrack, but it sounds  like someone doing a Christopher Walken imitation.

 

 

 

Aren't there two Jungle Book remakes coming out? Is the Disney one the one that just came out?  I've been enjoying all of the live action remakes that Disney has been doing lately, though I just hope they don't go insane and start making lame versions.  Next year, they're doing Beauty and the Beast with Emma Watson as Belle.  If only Robby Benson would come back to reprise his role as the Beast, but with Watson cast, the age difference would be kind of strange--at least after he transforms back into Prince Adam. 

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Aren't there two Jungle Book remakes coming out? Is the Disney one the one that just came out?  I've been enjoying all of the live action remakes that Disney has been doing lately, though I just hope they don't go insane and start making lame versions.  Next year, they're doing Beauty and the Beast with Emma Watson as Belle.  If only Robby Benson would come back to reprise his role as the Beast, but with Watson cast, the age difference would be kind of strange--at least after he transforms back into Prince Adam. 

 

 

Yes, the one from  Disney is the JUNGLE BOOK movie that just came out.

Scarlet Johansson (who is the voice of Kaa in the movie) sings "Trust In Me" during the end credits of the movie.

 

 

I think Robby Benson would be great as the Beast in the live action remake of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.

The age difference between him and Emma Watson (Hermione from the Harry Potter movies) would pose a problem when the Beast turns back into Prince Adam, but they could get around it by using footage of Robby Benson from ICE CASTLES.  

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Now that we're getting closer to the awards season, and the time of year when more of the sophisticated films get released. I hope that anyone who sees any of the new films will post about them here and let everyone know what to check out and what to avoid, what has substance and what is all hype.

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a-quiet-passion-3.jpg

 

I'm actually very interested in A Quiet Passion, a new film from Terence Davies about Emily Dickinson.  It's been appearing in film festivals but apparently won't be generally released, if at all, until February (so it will be forgotten by the time the 2017 oscars come out.)

 

Anyway, here's a review from The Guardian by Andrew Pulver:

 

In 2015 Terence Davies released Sunset Song, his expansive adaptation of Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s novel of Scottish hill-farm life; now, early in 2016, another film has emerged: a biopic of 19th-century American poet Emily Dickinson, who died in 1886 after a lifetime of respectable frustration. On the face of it, the two couldn’t be more different: the former revels in its sweeping landscapes and full-blooded screaming matches, while the latter is a resolutely-controlled miniature, barely setting foot outside the Dickinson house in Amherst, Massachusetts.

For all that, A Quiet Passion sees Davies returning again to some familiar themes. His Dickinson – superbly played with a sort of restless passivity by Cynthia Nixon – is, like Sunset Song’s Chris Guthrie, a figure trapped by history and circumstance, desperate to find an outlet for the overwhelming emotions surging inside her. The internal politics of the family plays a dominant path in both – though in A Quiet Passion, the Dickinson paterfamilias Edward (Keith Carradine) is a figure of stern rectitude, for sure, but a long way from the demonic, violent father-figures in which Davies has previously specialised. Dickinson, in her emotional isolation and determination to confound suffocating social norms, also shares something with the Lily Bart of Davies’ 2000 masterpiece The House of Mirth.

 

Dickinson’s circumscribed life, with its interiorised focus, is certainly a challenge for film adaptation, and Davies’ solution – perhaps inevitably – is to cast it as a chamber drama, almost literally. A Quiet Passion rarely ventures outside Dickinson’s study, bedroom or living room, and makes the most of even the most minor of incidents. When Dickinson conceives a characteristically understated passion for a local clergyman – so understated, it’s only after an argument with her sister that you realise she was ever in love with him at all – the act of inviting him and his sanctimonious wife round for tea becomes a highly charged, meaningful encounter.

 

Dickinson’s exchanges with her family – sister Lavinia (Jennifer Ehle), brother Austin (Duncan Duff), mother Emily (Joanna Bacon) – as well as their witticism-spouting friend Vryling Wilder Buffum (Catherine Bailey) form the meat of the film, which is designed to articulate Dickinson’s principled stand against social convention, and to somehow humanise a figure that has become a byword for introversion and reclusiveness. In this it must be said Nixon does a brilliant job, and Davies’ self-written script, which dwells on the quotidian as much as grand gestures, gives her the tools.

 

Above all, though, it is Davies’ ability to invest even the most apparently-humdrum moments with some form of intense radiance that sustains his film. Every shot is beautifully composed and lit – as we have come to expect – and the actors deliver every line with absolute conviction. Dropping key poems on to the soundtrack may be a conventional move, but Davies’ selection is unerring and reinforces the emotion at every point. Classical though his shooting style may be, Davies isn’t afraid to try a little digital trickery: he overcomes the awkward age-jump moment when the younger actors are jettisoned by a smart ageing process in a portrait-photography studio.

 

After a long period in the wilderness, A Quiet Passion is Davies’ third feature since his comeback documentary Of Time and the City, following the Terence Rattigan adaptation The Deep Blue Sea, and then Sunset Song. We should be relieved that there’s no diminution of powers: rather, the opposite, in that Davies appears to be getting better every time.

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To LawrenceA, got your comment in my inbox on this one.  I've also been reviewing/going to between (36 to 60) new releases in a theatre for 35yrs to date

 

& once in awhile even post my little review of a major new release on here  i.e. "Sully" "Mag. 7"

 

But not every new release, they must have a common thread w/these forums

 

I don't go to as many as I always used to, several reasons.

 

My personal best yr & not including going back to one is 1997-(58) :D

 

Unfortunately thoughthe next movie I plan to go & see-(maybe *Mel Gibson's war-film "Hacksaw Ridge") but definitely *Beatty's "Rules Don't Apply"-(Nov. 23rd)

 

In this era, one tends to get burned-out with everything being CGI, sequels, comics, remakes,,etc

 

Then I'll of course check out "La La Land"-(Dec. 2nd) it's early, but already a given that musical-(usually not a big fan of the genre though)

Will easily lead the field of *Oscar nominations-(12 to 13) but will likely go onto sweep the 89th Annual Academy Awards

 

Best actress is already a blow-out w/Emma stone in it

 

However, Best Actor may be a close race *De Niro vs. *Denzel?  As you know, both would take home a 3rd *Oscar either way

 

The *Oscars-(which is my favorite thing to predict/handicap,etc But, I rarely agree with it's winners over the years

Matter of fact of my top ten fav. motion pictures only (3) have won BP *Gold

 

*"GFI" *"GFII" & *"Casablanca"

 

 

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We're only weeks away from the kickoff of awards season. Here are the dates for many of the upcoming events for 2016-2017: 

 

 

NOVEMBER 2016

 

Tuesday, November 22 -- Film Independent Spirit Award nominations.

 

Tuesday, November 22 -- Producers Guild nominations for documentary films

 

Monday, November 29 -- Gotham Awards (nominations announced on October 20).

 

Tuesday, November 29 -- Announcement of National Board of Review Awards.

 

 

DECEMBER 2016

Thursday, December 1 -- Critics' Choice Award nominations.

Thursday, December 1 -- New York Film Critics Circle winners announced.

Sunday, December 4 -- Los Angeles Film Critics Association winners announced.

Monday, December 5 -- Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association winners announced.

Thursday, December 8 -- American Film Institute Top 10.

Sunday, December 11 -- Critics' Choice Awards (A&E-TV).

Sunday, December 11 -- New York Film Critics Online winners.

Monday, December 12 -- Golden Globe nominations. 

Wednesday, December 14 – Screen Actors Guild nominations.

 

JANUARY 2017

 

Monday, January 2 – American Cinema Editors nominations.

Tuesday, January 5 -- Producers Guild nominations for television and digital series.

Wednesday, January 6 – Writers Guild of America nominations (films).

Saturday, January 8 – BAFTA nominations.

Saturday, January 8 - Golden Globe Awards (NBC-TV).

Tuesday, January 10 -- American Society of Cinematographers theatrical nominations.

Tuesday, January 10 -- Producers Guild theatrical nominations.

Tuesday, January 10 – Visual Effects Society nominations.

Wednesday, January 11 -- People's Choice Awards (CBS-TV).

Wednesday, January 11 – Directors Guild nominations (television and documentary).

Thursday, January 12 – Directors Guild nominations (feature films and first-time features).

Thursday, January 12 -- Costume Designers Guild nominations.

Monday, January 23 – Razzie Award nominations.

Tuesday, January 24 –  Academy Award nominations.

Friday, January 27 - American Cinema Editors Awards

Saturday, January 28 – Producers Guild Awards.

Sunday, January 29 – Screen Actors Guild Awards (TBS/TNT-TV).

 

FEBRUARY 2017

 

Saturday, February 4 - Writers Guild of America nominations.

 

Saturday, February 4 -- American Society of Cinematographers Awards.

 

Saturday, February 4 - Directors Guild of America awards.

 

Tuesday, February 7 – Visual Effects Society Awards nominations.

Saturday, February 11 - Art Directors Guild Awards.

Sunday, February 12 – BAFTA Awards (BBC America TV, tape delayed).

Sunday, February 19 - Writers Guild of America Awards.

Tuesday, Februar 21 -- Costume Designers Guild Awards.

Saturday, February 25 – Film Independent Spirit Awards (IFC-TV)

Saturday, February 25 – Razzie Awards revealed.

Sunday, February 26 – 89th annual Academy Awards (ABC-TV).

 
 
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The Light Between Oceans (2016) with Michael Fassbender and Alicia Vikander.  A film that manages to capture the boring boring boring life of a lighthouse keeper on a remote island.  Did I say it was boring?  An ex-WWI vet seeks the quiet life and takes a new bride to said remote island.  To say anymore would be to give away the one or two things that happen in this two plus hour film.  The totally foreseeable ending is interminable.  To say it is a weepy is an understatement.  I've never seen so many dripping noses since Blue is the Warmest Color.  Alexandre Desplat's wall-to-wall score is interesting at times but it was a tall order to try to carry this film.  It's nice to see Aussies Jack Thompson and Bryan Brown in supporting parts.  I'm glad I stayed to the bitter end because I saw something new in the tail credits ... Liquid Waste Technician.  Hey, he's in show biz.

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Exce

 

 

We're only weeks away from the kickoff of awards season. Here are the dates for many of the upcoming events for 2016-2017: 

 

 

NOVEMBER 2016

 

Tuesday, November 22 -- Film Independent Spirit Award nominations.

 

Monday, November 29 -- Gotham Awards (nominations announced on October 20).

 

Tuesday, November 29 -- Announcement of National Board of Review Awards.

 

 

DECEMBER 2016

Thursday, December 1 -- Critics' Choice Award nominations.

Thursday, December 1 -- New York Film Critics Circle winners announced.

Sunday, December 4 -- Los Angeles Film Critics Association winners announced.

Monday, December 5 -- Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association winners announced.

Thursday, December 8 -- American Film Institute Top 10.

Sunday, December 11 -- Critics' Choice Awards (A&E-TV).

Sunday, December 11 -- New York Film Critics Online winners.

Monday, December 12 -- Golden Globe nominations. 

Wednesday, December 14 – Screen Actors Guild nominations.

 

JANUARY 2017

 

Monday, January 2 – American Cinema Editors nominations.

Wednesday, January 6 – Writers Guild of America nominations (films).

Saturday, January 8 – BAFTA nominations.

Saturday, January 8 - Golden Globe Awards (NBC-TV).

Tuesday, January 10 -- American Society of Cinematographers theatrical nominations.

Tuesday, January 10 – Visual Effects Society nominations.

Wednesday, January 11 -- People's Choice Awards (CBS-TV).

Wednesday, January 11 – Directors Guild nominations (television and documentary).

Thursday, January 12 – Directors Guild nominations (feature films and first-time features).

Thursday, January 12 -- Costume Designers Guild nominations.

Monday, January 23 – Razzie Award nominations.

Tuesday, January 24 –  Academy Award nominations.

Friday, January 27 - American Cinema Editors Awards

Saturday, January 28 – Producers Guild Awards.

Sunday, January 29 – Screen Actors Guild Awards (TBS/TNT-TV).

 

FEBRUARY 2017

 

Saturday, February 4 - Writers Guild of America nominations.

 

Saturday, February 4 -- American Society of Cinematographers Awards.

 

Saturday, February 4 - Directors Guild of America awards.

 

Tuesday, February 7 – Visual Effects Society Awards nominations.

Saturday, February 11 - Art Directors Guild Awards.

Sunday, February 12 – BAFTA Awards (BBC America TV, tape delayed).

Sunday, February 19 - Writers Guild of America Awards.

Tuesday, Februar 21 -- Costume Designers Guild Awards.

Saturday, February 25 – Film Independent Spirit Awards (IFC-TV)

Saturday, February 25 – Razzie Awards revealed.

Sunday, February 26 – 89th annual Academy Awards (ABC-TV).

 
 

 

 

llent work!  However, where are the NBR Awards,etc? & PGA noms?

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   To LawrenceA, do you also go to moist of the official *Oscar contenders?

 

That earlier release "Light Between 0ceans" kinda' fell through the cracks though.

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No, I rarely go to the cinema anymore. I will see them all eventually, but not very often in the theater. Most of the kinds of films that get nominations don't come to my local theater, anyway.

 

Last year, the only nominated film that I saw on the big screen was Mad Max: Fury Road. The previous year the only one I saw at the theater was Gone Girl, and in 2013, I didn't see any of the nominated films until DVD/BluRay/cable.

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Excellent work!  However, where are the NBR Awards,etc? & PGA noms?

 

Thanks! The NBR announcement date was listed as Tuesday, November 29, 2016.

 

There are three different Producers Guild nomination dates:

 

· Documentary Theatrical Motion Pictures: November 22, 2016

· Television and Digital Series: January 5, 2017

· Theatrical Motion Pictures and Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures: January 10, 2017

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No, I rarely go to the cinema anymore. I will see them all eventually, but not very often in the theater. Most of the kinds of films that get nominations don't come to my local theater, anyway.

 

Last year, the only nominated film that I saw on the big screen was Mad Max: Fury Road. The previous year the only one I saw at the theater was Gone Girl, and in 2013, I didn't see any of the nominated films until DVD/BluRay/cable.

 

How interesting.  Last year the only Best Picture nominee I didn't see in a theatre was Bridge of Spies. 

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The Girl on the Train (2016) directed by Tate Taylor and starring Emily Blunt.  I thought this one was quite good and contrary to a CBC critics review it had enough twists and turns to keep me interested until the end.  In fact during some scenes I though Emily Blunt was underplaying her role only to be proved wrong by character revelations that come much later.  Allison Janney gives her usual high standard support playing a detective investigating the film's mystery.  And Danny Elfman's score is among his very best.

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I really didn't know anything about Hacksaw Ridge (2016) when I sat down to watch it.  Essentially it about a young conscientious objector from Virginia who enlists in the army in WWII and becomes a medic in the battle of Okinawa.  The film began with a myriad of stock cliches (it is hard to do a heroic period war film now without touching upon well-worn cliches) but then picks up when it delves into the character study of the out-of-place young soldier.  Andrew Garfield is quite good in the lead.  But be warned.  I don't think I've ever seen as violent a war film before.  And it is relentless with an incredible amount of gore.  Just when it starts to slip back into the cliches and the story becomes a little more 'far-fetched' I had the feeling that I was watching a true story.  As the saying goes you can't make this stuff up.  It is too bad it got a little heavy-handed.  When I saw director, Mel Gibson's name in the tail credits the style started to make more sense to me.  The ultra-violence combined with religious themes.  I have to say that that somehow diminished my appreciation for what was not altogether a bad effort.

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I really didn't know anything about Hacksaw Ridge (2016) when I sat down to watch it.  Essentially it about a young conscientious objector from Virginia who enlists in the army in WWII and becomes a medic in the battle of Okinawa.  The film began with a myriad of stock cliches (it is hard to do a heroic period war film now without touching upon well-worn cliches) but then picks up when it delves into the character study of the out-of-place young soldier.  Andrew Garfield is quite good in the lead.  But be warned.  I don't think I've ever seen as violent a war film before.  And it is relentless with an incredible amount of gore.  Just when it starts to slip back into the cliches and the story becomes a little more 'far-fetched' I had the feeling that I was watching a true story.  As the saying goes you can't make this stuff up.  It is too bad it got a little heavy-handed.  When I saw director, Mel Gibson's name in the tail credits the style started to make more sense to me.  The ultra-violence combined with religious themes.  I have to say that that somehow diminished my appreciation for what was not altogether a bad effort.

 

I heard a story about this film on NPR today, it sounded really interesting, though I'm not so much a fan of Mel Gibson's directorial efforts (even before he went insane).  I'm not a big fan of gore, especially if it's realistic--though I did like Saving Private Ryan.  Is this film gorier than that film? 

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My husband wants to see Doctor Strange which came out today.  It looks pretty good.  In exchange for going to this film, he's going with me to see Breakfast at Tiffany's on the big screen at the end of the month.

 

I want to see La La Land, that looks really good.

 

2016 films that I saw:

 

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (I rented this)

 

Captain America: Civil War (theater.  This was really good)

 

Ratchet & Clank (theater.  Not something I particularly wanted to see but my husband and sister did because they're a fan of the video game series)

 

Finding Dory (theater. This movie was awesome.  It is definitely a front-runner for the Best Animated Picture Oscar)

 

Batman: The Killing Joke (rented this film.  It was okay)

 

Suicide Squad (theater.  I thought this was a great movie.  I found it more entertaining than many of the latest superhero movies)

 

I really wanted to see Hail! Caesar.  I'm sure it's still in RedBox or I can borrow it from the library.

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I heard a story about this film on NPR today, it sounded really interesting, though I'm not so much a fan of Mel Gibson's directorial efforts (even before he went insane).  I'm not a big fan of gore, especially if it's realistic--though I did like Saving Private Ryan.  Is this film gorier than that film? 

 

I would say Hacksaw Ridge has 100 times more gore than Saving Private Ryan.  That may be conservative.

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I would say Hacksaw Ridge has 100 times more gore than Saving Private Ryan.  That may be conservative.

It is more gory & well-made, but not superb. "Pvt. Ryan' only had it in spats,etc where is about 70% of this one is very bloody

but not the most violent I've vever seen

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If there was a superhero in the movie, I saw it.  As much as I liked watching Batman vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, Captain America: Civil War, and Deadpool, I loved Batman: The Return of the Caped Crusaders.  To see Adam West, Burt Ward, and Julie Newmar reprise their roles in animated form was great.  The movie captured the feel of the TV show with elements of the other Batman movies sprinkled in, including the 1943 and 1949 versions.  It was shown in the theaters for one day and I loved seeing it on the big screen. 

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The Accountant (2016) starring Ben Affleck and Anna Kendrick was fun in a kind of bang-bang mindless way.  It doesn't take long before one realizes how preposterous the premise is.  I'm not giving away much by saying it concerns the double life of a brilliant autistic accountant and a lethal assassin.  The film is too long for its kind and the last third of the film is completely ludicrous.

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Anthropoid (2016) directed by Sean Ellis and starring Jamie Dornan and Cillian Murphy tells the story of the assassination of SS Gruppenfuhrer, Reinhard Heydrich, the butcher of Prague.  The story has been told before, most notably during WWII itself in Hangmen Also Die (1943) and Hitler's Madmen (1943).  As one would expect this is a more serious effort told from the perspective of the seven Czech resistance fighters who were parachuted into occupied Czechoslovakia in what was essentially a suicide mission.  The first hour of the film lags a bit but picks up when it focuses on the incredible courage of the seven men.  Sean Ellis, wrote, produced, directed and was the cinematographer on this film.  I liked it very much but wasn't a fan of the shaky-cam cinematography.  It works well during the action sequences but it throws me off in scenes where people are just talking to one another in a parlour.  Especially in a period piece.  Why are we to be reminded of the camera?

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I was disappointed by The Unknown Girl (2016) by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, Belgian brothers who are darlings of the film festival circuit.  Without giving too much away it is about the guilt that a young doctor feels for not admitting someone into her walk-in clinic after hours.  The police inform the doctor the next day that the person was murdered shortly thereafter.  Adele Haenel is quite good as the young doctor who has a practice on the wrong side of the tracks.  Her guilt then drives her to try to identify the deceased girl.  Guilt interestingly manifests itself throughout the film with characters suffering health problems because of it.  But the script does not live up to the premise and its themes.  For one, i usually cannot stand films that rely too heavily on phone calls.  Haenel's mobile rings about every two minutes.  And secondly, every character goes through the exact same plot device.  The first time we see them they have no interest in speaking with or helping the doctor.  The second, third or fourth time we see them their story unfolds a little more.  Having the same plot device for every character leant a tedious quality to the film.

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