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Rudyard Kipling Adaptions in Movies and Television


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Hello, everyone.

 

I am starting this thread to talk about an ancestor of mine and the adaptations of his writing.

 

I am descended from the *brother* of Rudyard Kipling on my mother's side.

 

I try to see every adaption of his writing.

 

My favourite poem of his is "If" which he wrote for his son.  It always makes me cry when I read it.

 

 

My favourite movie of his work is Gunga Din.

 

 

 

My favourite version of The Jungle Book is the animated Disney movie.

 

 

What are your favourite Rudyard Kipling adapted movies and television?

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What is your opinion of The Man Who Would Be King?

 

I have heard it described as a fun buddy film, but I don't see it as touching the greatness of Gunga Din.

 

I have only recently seen it for the first time and wish I had seen it at least once before Sean Connery became ill.

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What is your opinion of The Man Who Would Be King?

 

I have heard it described as a fun buddy film, but I don't see it as touching the greatness of Gunga Din.

 

I have only recently seen it for the first time and wish I had seen it at least once before Sean Connery became ill.

 

I'm not a fan of The Man Who Would Be King. Those two leads -- too stereotypical British yobbo for me, way over the top. I love Gunga Din but my favorite Kipling adaptation by far is The Light that Failed (1939) -- a gorgeous, moving, amazingly quiet and thoughtful movie.

 

I assume you have seen the 2007 television mini-series My Boy Jack.

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I'm not a fan of The Man Who Would Be King. Those two leads -- too stereotypical British yobbo for me, way over the top. I love Gunga Din but my favorite Kipling adaptation by far is The Light that Failed (1939) -- a gorgeous, moving, amazingly quiet and thoughtful movie.

 

I assume you have seen the 2007 television mini-series My Boy Jack.

 

I don't believe I've seen The Light that Failed (1939 / 1940). The plot description aligns with your description. I'll look forward to TCM's presentation, though it's not currently scheduled.

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I'm not a fan of The Man Who Would Be King. Those two leads -- too stereotypical British yobbo for me, way over the top. I love Gunga Din but my favorite Kipling adaptation by far is The Light that Failed (1939) -- a gorgeous, moving, amazingly quiet and thoughtful movie.

 

I assume you have seen the 2007 television mini-series My Boy Jack.

 

 

No don't assume this as I do not have a copy of this.  I will add it to my list of to-see movies/mini-series.

 

I have yet to see The light That Failed.  Does it air on TCM at all?  I have added it to my to-see list.

 

 

Thanks for these suggestions.

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No don't assume this as I do not have a copy of this.  I will add it to my list of to-see movies/mini-series.

 

I have yet to see The light That Failed.  Does it air on TCM at all?  I have added it to my to-see list.

 

 

Thanks for these suggestions.

 

 

David Haig is excellent as Rudyard Kipling in My Boy Jack, and Daniel Radcliffe is equally good as his son John.

 

The Light that Failed never (to my knowledge) shows on TCM. It's on YouTube/Dailymotion -- in parts. Have a look at the opening credits and opening scene. One is immediately drawn into another time and place.

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I like the Soyuzmultfilm adaptations of The Cat That Walked By Himself (1968) and Mowgli (1967-71, initially released in 20 minute installments).

 

Here is the 1965 version of Rikki Tikki Tavy that compares favorably with Chuck Jones' TV version of 1974. Intriguingly an Indian family replaces a British one in this version.

 

 

 

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The Man Who Would Be King is an adventure film favourite of mine, rich in atmosphere, adding tremendously to the film's feeling of rugged authenticity.

 

Above all, though, the production is memorable for the marvelous performances of its two male stars, friends off screen, that friendship undoubtedly playing a huge role in their great screen chemistry. There's the macho strut of Sean Connery in the largely stoic role of a scalawag soldier of fortune and adventurer who becomes the title character. But Connery's stoicism is counter balanced by the happy Cockney chatter of Michael Caine's rogue, a rascal, to be sure, but with a bit of a wink in his eye about it. Caine's performance brings some humour to the film, as well.

 

One of the great films of John Huston's career, in my opinion, as it is for both Caine and Connery. A word of appreciation, too, to Christopher Plummer's wry portrayal of Rudyard Kipling, shaking his head in amused disbelief at the two outragious rogues who reveal their ambitious, risky plan of to make a fortune to him at the film's beginning.

 

SPOILER:

 

The climax is memorable, with Connery, condemned to death but refusing to give his captors the satisfaction of seeing him plead for mercy. He instead struts defiantly onto that swinging bridge over the chasm and sings at the top of his lungs as the ropes keeping the bridge suspended are hacked away. Bogus king that he may have been, he dies in spirit like one.

 

manwhowouldbeking.jpg

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Thanks for the excellent write up about The Man Who Would Be King, Tom.

 

 

I want to see this a second time to see it for the film itself and not as an adaptation of Kipling's writing only which is how I tend to watch Kipling movies for the first time because of my relation to him.

 

The first time I saw it I was analysing the movie too much.

 

Of course, now with Sean Connery's dementia there is an added poignancy to the film.

 

Christopher Plummer was at first unrecognizable to me when he came on screen.  His is my favourite portrayal of Rudyard Kipling so far among what I have seen.

 

 

 

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Tom, I'm another big fan of THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING. Oswald Morris' great cinematography is another huge plus. Seeing this on the big screen at last year's TCM festival with Christopher Plummer in attendance was a special treat. The audience was very enthusiastic.

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Tom, I'm another big fan of THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING. Oswald Morris' great cinematography is another huge plus. Seeing this on the big screen at last year's TCM festival with Christopher Plummer in attendance was a special treat. The audience was very enthusiastic.

 

 

Lucky you! :)

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Thanks for this version of Rikki Tikki Tavi.  I have never seen it before.

 

The top Soviet animation studio put out some pretty good stuff, especially in the sixties and seventies. Earlier, under the tight reign of Stalin and Khrushchev, they were striving to be an imitation of Disney and were kinda stuck in a routine style. A lot of their forties (after they started doing everything in color during the war years) and fifties product suffered from a certain "sameness": lifelike animals who were more storybook than "funny" (unlike the Looney Tunes made on the other side of the globe) and rotoscoped humans in Russian fairy tales. Yet once the UPA and Zagreb "influence" penetrated and The Authorities In Charge were OK with more experimental animation styles, they had a golden age of sorts.

 

The Kipling adaptations are quite interesting in that they follow the stories rather closely. Yes, Disney's version of THE JUNGLE BOOK is fun with George Sanders playing a cynical Sanders-ish Shere Khan and lots of fun peppy music, but the MOWGLI (or MAUGLI) series is more straight forward. I have the DVD of this series, but you can probably find them all online to watch as well. Here is the wikipedia entry comparing and contrasting it with the Kipling original: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adventures_of_Mowgli

 

I don't know how many here are familiar with Mary Blair, who designed many Disney animated features. Her "stamp" is obvious in those Disney films that literally brought her storyboards and artwork to the screen with only limited modifications, such as the "Johnny Appleseed" segment in MELODY TIME and shorts like THE LITTLE HOUSE. I think of RIKKI TIKKI TAVY and, to a lesser degree, MAUGLI, compare nicely with her stuff... sort of a blending of traditional Disney "storybook" with UPA's Matisse-like "cut-out shape" look. The trees all look like something out of your 1940s-50s Golden Book.

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Tom, I'm another big fan of THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING. Oswald Morris' great cinematography is another huge plus. Seeing this on the big screen at last year's TCM festival with Christopher Plummer in attendance was a special treat. The audience was very enthusiastic.

 

Good point, kingrat, about the cinematography. It's a very handsome production.

 

That's great that you were able to see this film with Christopher Plummer in attendance. I felt that same way last year when I saw Vertigo at TIFF, with Kim Novak present (and answering questions afterward).

 

I've seen a few references on these boards to Sean Connery being ill (dementia), but I can't find anything other than unconfirmed rumours about it when I google it. Would anyone know if Connery really is ill?

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Good point, kingrat, about the cinematography. It's a very handsome production.

 

That's great that you were able to see this film with Christopher Plummer in attendance. I felt that same way last year when I saw Vertigo at TIFF, with Kim Novak present (and answering questions afterward).

 

I've seen a few references on these boards to Sean Connery being ill (dementia), but I can't find anything other than unconfirmed rumours about it when I google it. Would anyone know if Connery really is ill?

 

 

According to his Man Who Would Be King co-star and close friend Michael Caine, he is no longer in control of his faculties.  That is what I read on Banis4's CANDIDS thread when he posted a picture of the two of them together on Caine's birthday.

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RE: THE JUNGLE BOOK:

 

I have this book and read it.  I know the big screen version with Sabu is for realistic.  The animated version is my favourite because I love the music and I recognize the stars who were the voice characters.

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According to his Man Who Would Be King co-star and close friend Michael Caine, he is no longer in control of his faculties.  That is what I read on Banis4's CANDIDS thread when he posted a picture of the two of them together on Caine's birthday.

 I saw that Caine comment in CANDIDS, as well, GPFan. But when I goggled it afterward I saw a Caine denial of a newspaper report that he had ever said that.

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 I saw that Caine comment in CANDIDS, as well, GPFan. But when I goggled it afterward I saw a Caine denial of a newspaper report that he had ever said that.

 

 

Well, I hope that Connery is healthy.  However, I would not wish dementia on my worst enemy so whenever I hear that dementia is confirmed, I start praying that the person dies while still aware of who she/he is.

 

I was very upset when Peter Falk died at first until I found out about his dementia and then I was happy for him.

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KIM is another great adaptation of Rudyard Kipling's writing.

 

This is a fun Errol Flynn movie.

 

The game Kim plays in this film to remember things in large numbers has been adapted over the years and is called Kim's Game.

 

You take a plate of various and sundry small items and show them around to everyone in the room.  Then you cover the plate and take it away.

 

Then people are told to write down as many items they remember being on the plate.

 

It's a fun game.

 

What do people think about the movie KIM?

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I forgot to mention in this thread when we were on the year 1937 in the Favourite Performances thread the movie and novel Captains Courageous.

 

There has been quite a debate over  whether Spencer Tracy who won the Oscar for Best Actor should have been a supporting Actor category participant and many people agree about this.

 

Regardless, the movie is a fun adventure film full of great performances and a popular child star, Freddie Bartholomew.

 

 

 

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I don't think Wee Willie Winkie (1937), directed by John Ford and starring Shirley Temple, has been mentioned in this thread. It's an enjoyable film based on a story by Kipling. 

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I don't think Wee Willie Winkie (1937), directed by John Ford and starring Shirley Temple, has been mentioned in this thread. It's an enjoyable film based on a story by Kipling. 

 

Thanks for mentioning it.  I have not seen Wee Willie Winkie yet.  It is one of the Shirley temple films I have yet to see.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The new Disney animated version of The Jungle Book looks like great fun in the clips I have watched.

 

When the first Disney animated version of this was released people thought that it was odd to have famous people look just like the characters or perhaps over-aware of the actors like George sanders, Louis Prima or Sterling Holloway.

 

Now it is common practice no matter what company is producing it.

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Okay, so the reviews of the new The Jungle Book animated version give it an F, so  as I love the original, I will skip this new version.

 

Actually, it's not animated. The environments and the kid playing Mowgli are real. The animals are CGI, but as realistically as possible.

 

Also, while Lorna didn't like it, that's the minority opinion, as it's sitting at 94% Fresh on Rotten Tomatoes and a has a Cinemascore rating of A, and it's been one of the best reviewed movies yet this year. There were also a few other posters here who gave it positive reviews when it came out last week, or whenever it was.

 

I have no desire to see it, as it's not my cup of tea, but I don't want you to write it off due to one bad review.

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