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ALAN HALE SR. & ALAN HALE JR. WHICH IS WHICH?


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Does anybody know any facial characteristics that differentiate between father and son? I can never tell them apart and have to hope the year of the movie is listed to try to figure it from there. Dad was born in 1898 (I think), but son was born in 1918, so they were both acting at the same time, and a difference of 20 years isn't that noticeable in two guys with such similar features (the premature white hair, chubby cheeks, etc). Watching Destination Tokyo and realized I didn't know which one it was.

 

P. S. I wish they had played 'Gentleman's Agreement today, or is that going to be on Greg Peck's day?

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Their features are similar, but if you watch enough Gilligan, you'll be able to tell the difference. One easy way to tell is their voices. Sr. is a little higher pitched. And, the only overlap that they had in films was in the 1940s (Sr. died in 1950). Jr. is pretty easy to tell in all of his movies from that decade because he looks real young in the face.

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Thank you, but I don't think I recall ever seeing Gilligans Island. Dick Van Dyke was about the only 1/2 hour comedy I watched when my kids were young, too busy getting them off to bed and helping with homework. I thought Sr. died later than that.

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> Does anybody know any facial characteristics that

> differentiate between father and son? I can never

> tell them apart and have to hope the year of the

> movie is listed to try to figure it from there. Dad

> was born in 1898 (I think), but son was born in 1918,

> so they were both acting at the same time, and a

> difference of 20 years isn't that noticeable in two

> guys with such similar features (the premature white

> hair, chubby cheeks, etc). Watching Destination

> Tokyo and realized I didn't know which one it was.

>

> P. S. I wish they had played 'Gentleman's Agreement

> today, or is that going to be on Greg Peck's day?

 

Actually, Alan Hale, Sr. was born in 1892, so he was 26 when his son was born. Sr. was literally in dozens and dozens of Warner Brothers movies from the mid- 1930s through the mid-1940s (usually playing the main character's good-natured best friend) and since junior would only have been 20-30 during those years it should be easy to tell them apart. I don't believe the son had much of a movie career; he's chiefly known for being in Gilligan's Island, as the previous poster has mentioned. As far as Destination Tokyo is concerned, that's definitely Sr. Two of his more notable roles were as Little John in The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) and as Ida Lupino's husband in They Drive By Night(1940). However, he turns up everywhere in those great Warners movies from the 1930s and 1940s. Junior doesn't.

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There's a great physical resemblance between father and son, but the really striking thing is how similar their voices were (though Senior's was a tad deeper).

 

Senior was, by far, the better actor; he was a superb mime who did more with a glance or double-take than most actors can do with a soliloquy.

 

Junior was certainly an enjoyable actor to watch, but never rose to his father's level of skill.

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"I wish they had played 'Gentleman's Agreement' today, or is that going to be on Greg Peck's day?"

 

Alas, Gregory Peck's day was last Friday and they didn't play it then either. I believe Gentleman's Agreement belongs to Twentieth Century Fox, so you might catch it over at the Fox Movie Channel.

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Sr. belonged to that treasured sect of character actors coddled on the backlot. He usually appeared as Errol Flynn's sidekick in such films as The Adventures of Robin Hood and Dodge City, although he played his enemy in The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex. Jr. is best known as the skipper of the Minnow on Gilligan's Island.

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I recently caught Alan Sr. on TCM in 1921's early Valentino epic, The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. Except for the fact that his hair was apparently red or brown at the time, Mr. Hale really didn't look all that different than he did decades later. What a career! He first appeared before the cameras in 1911, and wound it up in 1950, in a movie called Rogues of Sherwood Forest. Interestingly, the legends of Sherwood, Robin and his Merry Men played quite a significant part in Senior's career. He not only played Little John in Douglas Fairbanks, Sr.'s Robin Hood(1922), but he filled the same role admirably in the Errol Flynn version in 1938---and again, he didn't look particularly changed with the years!

 

I think my favorite appearance of Alan Hale Sr. was in the entertainingly preposterous wartime adventure Desperate Journey(1942) in which his hair dye is gradually lost and his compatriots learn of his advanced years, snowy hair and brave heart.

 

Another aspect of Mr. Hale's talent explains his beautiful bass-baritone voice and marvelous laugh---he had originally studied to be an opera singer! I'd have loved to hear him sing a role in Cosi Fan Tutte or Faust!

 

As it is, he's one of those likable, skilled actors who always make me smile when I see him in a film. While I've always found his son to be a pleasant, yet softer person, Jr. came along at a time when, unfortunately, his skill was never developed much beyond the sitcom level for the mass media culture--though, like his father, stories about him as a person are always positive in nature.

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Since you didn't see Gilligan's Island, you might have seen Alan Hale, Jr. in It Happens Every Spring. He's one of Ray Milland's chemistry students who help him test his mystery formula that is a wood repellant.

 

CharlieT

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Sr. belonged to that treasured sect of character actors coddled on the backlot. He usually appeared as Errol Flynn's sidekick in such films as The Adventures of Robin Hood and Dodge City, although he played his enemy in The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex. Jr. is best known as the skipper of the Minnow on Gilligan's Island.

 

The stars bring people into the theaters, but it's often the character actors who keep the patrons **** in their seats from then on.

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No, they made a lot of them (ANGELS IN THE OUTFIELD, THE KID FROM LEFT FIELD, THE WINNING TEAM, THE STRATTON STORY, BIG LEAGUER, FEAR STRIKES OUT, THE PRIDE OF ST LOUIS, SAFE AT HOME, DAMN YANKEES).

 

I suppose if Tasmanian Errol Flynn could star in eight -- count 'em, eight! -- Westerns, Ray Milland could be in a couple of baseball pictures.

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  • 13 years later...
13 hours ago, MilesArcher said:

Here they are together.  Can you tell the difference now?

8880468155_0f18945abe_b.jpg 

 

Alan Sr. often had a mustache.  Junior normally did not.

The original post was over 13 years ago.     Hopefully since then the OP learned to tell the difference by watching endless loops of Gilligan Island reruns and Warner Bros films like Gentleman Jim and The Strawberry Blonde!

 

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