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The Saddest Movie You Ever Watched


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> Off the top of my head:

>

> It's a Wonderful Life- I always cry when the whole

> town comes to George Bailey's house - no matter how

> many times I see it.

>

> To Kill a Mockingbird - so moving.

>

> Forrest Gump - I always cry when Forrest is at

> Jenny's grave - no matter how many times I see it.

> And also when Jenny is throwing rocks at her old

> house where she was abused.

>

> Believe it or not, when TCM showed The Champ with Jon

> Voigt, Faye Dunaway and Ricky Shroeder on Fathers Day

> I was crying like a baby. That movie pushed so many

> buttons with me.

>

> I'm sure there's many more that will come to me, but

> those are probably the main ones.

>

> Brad

 

I've thought of a couple more this afternoon.

 

I can't believe I forgot about Brokeback Mountain earlier. I think it's tragic that they couldn't just be together, that they had to settle for a weekend together every few years. The scenery was beautiful and the music haunting.

 

SPOILER ALERT

 

I cried when Heath went to see Jake's parents after he died, and spent a few minutes in his room. Heartbreaking.

 

I was also touched by the relationship between James Garner and Gena Rowland in The Notebook.

 

Brad

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> A Time To Kill

> Penny Serenade

> Ordinary People

> Each Story is different,but things that happen in

> real life.Not always with a good ending.

 

Good call about "A Time to Kill" I mentioned in another thread not long ago that Matthew's closing argument will bring you to tears. Very moving.

 

Brad

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I have thought about this topic a bit and, honestly, the movie I watched and made me so sad was a made for television film--"Promise" (1986).

 

"Promise" stars James Woods and James Garner as brothers. James Garner gets custody of his schizophrenic brother when their mother dies. James Woods as the schizophrenic brother performs what is the finest bit of acting in a made for television thing. Particularly striking was Woods' monologue during one of his character's few lucid moments--sitting in a chair, holding a cigarette with long ash dangling and telling James Garner all the things he will NOT do because of his permanent and debilitating mental illness, "...never have a driver's license, never go to college, never get married, never have children..." A heartbreaking moment.

 

I remember crying watching one of the versions of "Of Mice And Men". I was a teenager, so it was either the 1939 feature film, or the 1970 made for television version.

 

Rusty

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Brad, I'm not sure the OP was going for what movie made you cry (e.g. as in tearjerker), but what movie(s) make you sad. For instance, It's a Wonderful Life (1946) has the same affect on me, I tear up during that scene everytime (and I've seen it so many times) too, but they are tears of joy, not sadness.

 

OTOH, profoundly sad films which have made me cry include Come Back, Little Sheba (surprisingly not yet mentioned in this thread) and Life is Beautiful.

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I guess I suffer from residual separation anxiety:

 

I can't watch either of the following scenes without tearing up:

 

"Captain January," where Star is taken from the Captain's care by welfare agents, and cries "What did I do? What did I do?" as she is driven off in a big black car.

 

"Dumbo" Even thinking about the scene where Dumbo is tenderly cradled in the trunk of his imprisoned mother -she is confined, and he is outside the bars - is to awful to contemplate.

 

Excuse me. I'll be right back.

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Could not sleep last night. Watched "City of Angels" (Meg Ryan, Nick Cage). Forgot how completely emotional that movie makes me. So sad but you hope the story is really true (how people watch over us). Add to the list, you will love it!

 

By the way, speaking of "Dumbo", I saw "Bambi" at 7 and to this day I cannot watch it. I just cannot do it and I know my daughter will want to see it. She can, when she is 40!

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Hello SusannO!

 

I agree with you about "City of Angels",that is another example of a love unfullfilled.

 

I also agree with you about the other movies you mentioned, a lot of the Disney movies are so traumatic.Aside from the ones you mentioned there is also "Lion King", when the father dies the whole movie does a 360.

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Hi Cinemabuff 64 I saw that movie and the ending was very sad .I don't like endings like that and the other movie that gets me is Terms Of Endearment .I really lose it on that one anyway nice to see you on .I noticed there are a few of us up late tonight take care Inglis

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I wish I knew why Disney did so many of these. So many parents see Disney and think automatically they can plop their child down and it's ok. I try to watch most movies before my daughter and make a decision. A good suggestion for parents that has worked for me (until your kids are old enough to figure out what you are doing!), we watch and write down scenes we should skip (only if you have DVD).

Another great resource is Yahoo Movies "Movie Mom". She's good at helping you make movie choices.

Sorry, did not mean to stray!

 

I agree about "Lion King" but one of the few movies I have found to help us "show" our daughter that your loved ones will always be with you. We are Christian and I can show the connection of life and heaven.

Sorry, now I am getting religious.

 

By the way, as with "Bambi", I cannot watch "Old Yeller" either.

 

SusannO

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Really? The scene in A Night To Remember, where the staff person is comforting the kid left behind, yes that kills me every time.

 

But when DiCaprio shows up as a popsicle in the water? I laughed and laughed.

 

Seriously, I hated that movie, realllly, reallllly hated it.

 

dolores

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> Really? The scene in A Night To Remember,

> where the staff person is comforting the kid left

> behind, yes that kills me every time.

>

> But when DiCaprio shows up as a popsicle in the

> water? I laughed and laughed.

>

> Seriously, I hated that movie, realllly, reallllly

> hated it.

>

> dolores

 

" A Night to Remember " is far and away the better of the two films. Cameron's "Titanic" is unwatchable, as far as I am concerned.

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Brad

 

I agree with you about "Titanic",I found it to be very sad and accurate as far as the events that lead to its demise.

 

On the same note,I also liked "A Night to Remember",both are very good movies.

 

There is a third,made for TV version,I believe with Catherine Zeta-Jones from a few years back.It is also a good movie.

 

I would like to also mention another sad movie, "AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER",although this movie ended on a happy note,most of the time it leaves you desperate for Cary and Deborah and their situation.

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> Really? The scene in A Night To Remember,

> where the staff person is comforting the kid left

> behind, yes that kills me every time.

>

> But when DiCaprio shows up as a popsicle in the

> water? I laughed and laughed.

>

> Seriously, I hated that movie, realllly, reallllly

> hated it.

>

> dolores

 

You "laughed and laughed"? Really don't see the humor, but diffrent strokes for diffrent folks, as they say.

 

Is "A Night to Remember" also about the Titanic? And does it ever show on TCM?

 

Brad

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If your sense of 'sad' is linked to tragedy in the cinema, then I've got a few examples for you.

 

Without a doubt "How Green Was My Valley" tops my list. Just to hear the opening strains of the Welsh choir doing 'Men of Harloch' under the credits gets a lump in my throat. The final moment where the dead Donald Crisp is hoisted from the collapsed mine with Roddy McDowell's blank wounded expression (the voiceover declaring "Men like my father can never die...) is so wrought with poignancy that once seen it is unlikely to be forgotten.

 

A close second - "The Song of Bernadette" with the innocent Jennifer Jones angelic and ill fated, dying of cancer yet still able to whisper "I love you" to the vision of the Virgin Mary is almost as haunting.

 

I suppose I'm more sentimental than most - I also get choked up over The Bells of St. Marys when Bing Crosby finally confesses to Ingrid Bergman that she is being sent away because she has TB. "Remove all bitterness from my heart," Bergman declares. It's as though the weight of her regret becomes my own.

 

Honorable mention goes to:

 

It's a Wonderful Life

King's Row

Now Voyager

Citizen Kane

Gone With The Wind

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