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I suspect that the most celebrated of Lupino's directorial efforts (not that I've seen many of them) is The Hitch-Hiker. It is memorable, if only for William Talman's creepy performance. That eerie dead eye of his stays in my memory.

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I suspect that the most celebrated of Lupino's directorial efforts (not that I've seen many of them) is The Hitch-Hiker. It is memorable, if only for William Talman's creepy performance. That eerie dead eye of his stays in my memory.

 

The Hitch-Hiker shows Tallman in his pre-Hamilton Burger days on Perry Mason.

 

Quite a departure the DA was from the creep he played in The Hitch-Hiker.

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The Hitch-Hiker shows Tallman in his pre-Hamilton Burger days on Perry Mason.

 

Quite a departure the DA was from the creep he played in The Hitch-Hiker.

 

That's right. As Hamilton Burger, he would have been trying to prosecute the creep he plays here. Then again, he would also have been trying to prosecute a lot of the creeps Raymond Burr played in his pre-Mason days, as well.

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Debra-- Ida directed movies that were sensitive to women's issues. The DVD that I bought is called The Bigamist. And she also co-stars in that movie.

 

Sorry to say I haven't seen Hard and Fast.

 

The Hard Way came along when there was a plethora of movies. If it wasn't the hit it should have been from Warner Bros, it was because the top slot for that kind of an actress had already been taken by Bette Davis.

 

You have to know a little bit about the studio system to understand how actresses were promoted according to types. Bette already have the slot for the aggressive- affirmative, no prisoners taken woman and she was making a lot of money at the box office.

 

So the studio didn't see any point of promoting a similar-type actress when they could find another actress, with a different type characterization and make additional money from a fresh audience with the other-type actress.

 

The other movies that she directed had subjects concerning rape and polio attacking a female artist who was a dancer. Ida had also been a victim of polio.

 

She even made one Macho movie, just to prove that she could. It's called The Hitch-Hiker.

 

There are several movies that she stars in that I really like.

 

Her starring debut at Warner Brothers was a movie called They Drive by Night. I don't know how familiar you are with Classic Hollywood movies but this movie is full of stars of the era like Humphrey Bogart, George Raft and Ann Sheridan. I would take a look at it.

 

Then she has a wonderful part in a Humphrey Bogart movie called High Sierra it's a classic.

 

Later she went on to another Studio 20th Century Fox and she made this terrific film noir called Roadhouse. It's also a classic and co-stars Richard Widmark.

 

I also like another noir called on Dangerous Ground, which co-starred Robert Ryan.

 

I would suggest that you look her up under Wiki or IMDb to find out more about her and see what you think might interest you.

 

Also you should know she directed a lot of Television. She directed The Untouchables with Robert Stack; at that time she may have been the only woman actually doing that in classic television.

 

Also, I would suggest you see some of the Bette Davis movies of the era, if you haven't already, to see what kind of competition she was up against. Another actress who made similar type movies was Barbara Stanwyck.

 

I would say anything with Ida in it from 1940 on is probably quite good.

Good luck!

Oh I'm QUITE familiar w/Ms. Davis as well as Ms. Stanwyck (and Crawford!).  Not so much w/Ida and just now discovering this great actress!

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OK, so last night I watched "The Big Knife" which Lupina starred in and "Not Wanted" which she directed (and coincidentally starred the girl from "Hard, Fast & Beautiful").  I really enjoyed both!

Isn't the last scene of THE BIG KNIFE great or what. Absolutely devastating. 

 

What I find interesting about her, which I probably mentioned in another thread, is that she stopped directing in the late 60s and went back to acting full-time. So does that mean she re-embraced being an actress and let go of being a director? And what was it like for her acting in the 70s? If you watch JUNIOR BONNER or episodes of Columbo where she guest stars, she is very much in control and it seems like she is directing herself. She was precise with every movement, it all has meaning with her. 

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OK, so last night I watched "The Big Knife" which Lupina starred in and "Not Wanted" which she directed (and coincidentally starred the girl from "Hard, Fast & Beautiful").  I really enjoyed both!

 

Lupino found the experience of making The Big Knife (shot in just 15 days) a very emotional one. The film was based on a play which had starred her close friend, John Garfield, who had recently passed away. Ida was thinking of Garfield throughout the making of the film, and surely that had something to do with the tremendous impact of her climactic scene at the film's end.

 

She told director Robert Aldrich, who rewrote the dialogue "My God, Bob, you're a strange person. You have written words for me as if I'm talking to John, who has passed on."

 

"That's exactly what I want," Aldrich replied.

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Isn't the last scene of THE BIG KNIFE great or what. Absolutely devastating. 

 

What I find interesting about her, which I probably mentioned in another thread, is that she stopped directing in the late 60s and went back to acting full-time. So does that mean she re-embraced being an actress and let go of being a director? And what was it like for her acting in the 70s? If you watch JUNIOR BONNER or episodes of Columbo where she guest stars, she is very much in control and it seems like she is directing herself. She was precise with every movement, it all has meaning with her. 

Screen%2Bshot%2B2016-04-01%2Bat%2B9.10.0

 

Supposedly Lupino was never 100% comfortable with being a director and never fully committed to it, acting intermittendly. She was criticized by many feminists in the 60s and 70s not only for the female characters in her films but also for some of the comments she made about directing. She was quoted as saying that it is not a womanly field, admitted that it took a lot of strain out of her. She was also pretty self-deprecating about her ability calling herself the poor man's Don Siegel. 

 

Also, Lupino's alcoholism was getting out of hand. According to a documentary on her, she started drinking as a masochistic way to punish her hard-drinking, philandering husband Howard Duff. I always found it interesting that in the films and TV episodes they acted in together that the characters were adversarial with one another. 

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Supposedly Lupino was never 100% comfortable with being a director and never fully committed to it, acting intermittendly. She was criticized by many feminists in the 60s and 70s not only for the female characters in her films but also for some of the comments she made about directing. She was quoted as saying that it is not a womanly field, admitted that it took a lot of strain out of her. 

Knowing her, it's because she was such a perfectionist.

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Supposedly Lupino was never 100% comfortable with being a director and never fully committed to it, acting intermittendly. She was criticized by many feminists in the 60s and 70s not only for the female characters in her films but also for some of the comments she made about directing. She was quoted as saying that it is not a womanly field, admitted that it took a lot of strain out of her. She was also pretty self-deprecating about her ability calling herself the poor man's Don Siegel. 

 

Also, Lupino's alcoholism was getting out of hand. According to a documentary on her, she started drinking as a masochistic way to punish her hard-drinking, philandering husband Howard Duff. I always found it interesting that in the films and TV episodes they acted in together that the characters were adversarial with one another. 

HOWARD DUFF?!!!  I just googled him 2 weeks ago.  Can't recall why.  For some reason, I was thinking he was the guy who played Barbar Belle Geddes husband Jock Ewing on the original tv show "Dallas" found out after googling he wasn't.

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HOWARD DUFF?!!!  I just googled him 2 weeks ago.  Can't recall why.  For some reason, I was thinking he was the guy who played Barbara Belle Geddes husband Jock Ewing on the original tv show "Dallas" found out after googling he wasn't.

The guy who played her husband was western film star Jim Davis. You might have been thinking of Howard Keel, who was in all those MGM musicals of the 1950s. He played the second husband, Clayton Farlow.

 

But Howard Duff, married to Ida Lupino, did a nighttime soap opera in the 1980s. He took the part of the sheriff, played by Sidney Greenstreet in the movie, when Flamingo Road was turned into a TV series. 

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The guy who played her husband was western film star Jim Davis. You might have been thinking of Howard Keel, who was in all those MGM musicals of the 1950s. He played the second husband, Clayton Farlow.

 

But Howard Duff, married to Ida Lupino, did a nighttime soap opera in the 1980s. He took the part of the sheriff, played by Sidney Greenstreet in the movie, when Flamingo Road was turned into a TV series. 

Duff also played the lead in a classic "Twilight Zone" episode

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Duff also played the lead in a classic "Twilight Zone" episode

My favorite Howard Duff television appearance is in a first season episode of St. Elsewhere, from 1983. He plays a buddy of Norman Lloyd's in town for a visit. One day when they are out for a drive, they get into an altercation with other motorists who would be the age of their grandsons. Duff experiences a surge of adrenaline and starts beating up on the young thugs. Norman Lloyd's reactions are priceless. It's hilarious. 

 

Duff also turned up on Scarecrow & Mrs. King as a retired spy who may or may not have been a double agent. He was so good the producers brought him back for the show's very last episode. 

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She was fantastic in that one episode of Twilight Zone, entitled "The Sixteen Millimeter Shrine." This episode had a sort of Norma Desmond feel to it. I liked it.

 

That's one of my favorites too.  I don't think it's been mentioned yet but Lupino also directed the Twilight Zone ep "The Masks", one of the best in the series, with a shocker ending.  She was the only woman to direct an episode in TZ.

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I'm a fan of Tom Selleck in Magnum PI- - I can remember Howard Duff in one of his last roles, playing Magnums grandfather. He was really good.

Yes. He was very good in that series, too. He was still making appearances on TV up to 1990. One of the last credits for him is his role as William Devane's father on Knots Landing. A few seasons earlier Ava Gardner had played Devane's mother. 

 

But I still love the scene on St. Elsewhere where he beats up that younger guy. It's on Hulu. Check it out.

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The guy who played her husband was western film star Jim Davis. You might have been thinking of Howard Keel, who was in all those MGM musicals of the 1950s. He played the second husband, Clayton Farlow.

 

But Howard Duff, married to Ida Lupino, did a nighttime soap opera in the 1980s. He took the part of the sheriff, played by Sidney Greenstreet in the movie, when Flamingo Road was turned into a TV series. 

Never watched the show "Flamingo Road" but loved the movie starring Joan Crawford.  Seen it several times.  Was the tv show based on or anything like the movie?

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Never watched the show "Flamingo Road" but loved the movie starring Joan Crawford.  Seen it several times.  Was the tv show based on or anything like the movie?

Yes, it was based on the movie. Morgan Fairchild played Crawford's part in the TV version. It ran for two seasons, and given the format and the era of 80s soaps, I thought it was well made. 

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Never watched the show "Flamingo Road" but loved the movie starring Joan Crawford.  Seen it several times.  Was the tv show based on or anything like the movie?

Actually, Cristina Raines.played the character.that Crawford did in the film. Morgan Fairchild.played the fiancee.of the deputy who falls for Raines; he was played by Mark.Harmon.

 

The tv.show had a handful.of names going back to Hollywood's Golden.Age,.including Howard Duff, Kevin McCarthy,.Barbara.Rush and Stella.Stevens

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One of the last credits for him is his role as William Devane's father on Knots Landing. A few seasons earlier Ava Gardner had played Devane's mother. 

 

 

 

This is rich.   According to an magazine article from the Mr. Adams & Eve era they'd been involved pretty heavily just before he married Ida; thinking of Devane as their child is intriguing.  Then again, I'd have considered the same thing with Devane; that toothy, devilish grin got me every time.    

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