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the un-hi-jackable thread


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Here is the line up for everyone! Hope as many people watch as possible!

 

18 Monday

 

6:00 AM Greta Garbo Part 1: The Temptress (1986) In the first part of this rarely-seen Swedish documentary tracks Garbo's rise to ultra-stardom, from her early film career in Sweden to her introduction to the studio system . BW-59 mins, TV-MA

 

7:00 AM Greta Garbo Part 2: The Clown (1986)

In the second part of this series, Garbo's career in talking pictures and her life off the screen is discussed. Featuring interviews and film clips of some of her best work. BW-59 mins, TV-PG

 

8:00 AM Mata Hari (1931)

Romantic biography of World War I's notorious lady spy. Cast: Greta Garbo, Ramon Novarro, Lionel Barrymore. Dir: George Fitzmaurice. BW-89 mins, TV-PG, CC

 

10:00 AM Susan Lenox: Her Fall and Rise (1931)

A farm girl runs from her abusive father to a series of affairs in the big city. Cast: Greta Garbo, Clark Gable, Jean Hersholt. Dir: Robert Z. Leonard. BW-76 mins, TV-PG

 

11:30 AM Queen Christina (1933)

Romantic tale of the 17th-century Swedish queen and her romance with a Spanish diplomat. Cast: Greta Garbo, John Gilbert, Lewis Stone. Dir: Rouben Mamoulian. BW-97 mins, TV-G, CC

 

1:15 PM Painted Veil, The (1934)

A wife strays, then fights to redeem herself to her husband. Cast: Greta Garbo, Herbert Marshall, George Brent. Dir: Richard Boleslawski. BW-85 mins, TV-G, CC

 

2:45 PM Camille (1936)

In this classic 19th-century romance, a kept woman runs off with a young admirer in search of love and happiness. Cast: Greta Garbo, Robert Taylor, Lionel Barrymore. Dir: George Cukor. BW-109 mins, TV-PG, CC, DVS

 

4:45 PM Two Faced Woman (1941)

A woman pretends to be her own twin sister to win back her straying husband. Cast: Greta Garbo, Melvyn Douglas, Constance Bennett. Dir: George Cukor. BW-90 mins, TV-G, CC

 

6:30 PM Greta Garbo Documentary (2005)

BW-0 mins, TV-PG, CC

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Hi all! I've got the dvd recorder on full steam ahead this morning. I had the timer set to record Tom Jones last night from 1:45am-4am, so I figured I'd be able to start a new disc when Mata Hari came on at 8am. My cat woke me up at 6:35am and I decided I might as well just set the dvd timer to catch Mata Hari. Well, I ended up watching the last part of the Swedish documentary on Garbo that was on from 6-7, and then decided to record the second half of it that started at 7am. It was very interesting to get a Swedish perspective on Garbo and they showed some beautiful stills and photos. I really want to see Flesh and the Devil now!!! Actually, I really want to go out and buy the Garbo boxed set of dvds...but maybe I'll just put it on my Christmas list.

 

David--awesome pic of Garbo! Very cool. So, is that the famous shot where Garbo was told to "think of nothing" ?

 

In other news: I am a freak who is listening to Christmas music right now even though it is sunny and 70 degrees outside. I just had a taste of Nat King Cole and now my player has shuffled over to Randy Travis singing "Jingle Bell Rock." I like his version of the song. It has that twangy country guitar.

 

Sandy K

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Sandy, sometimes the bio documentaries are more interesting than her films. I have taped as many as I can get. They put her in such unmemorable movies sometimes. She carried the film. If it weren't for Garbo, the film would never be remembered at all! She finally made Anna Karenina, and Camille. Those were her only two successful literary classics during her later talking period. Norma got two others. I often wonder what The Barretts of Wimpole Street, and Romeo and Juliet would have been like with Garbo. I suppose her accent would have changed them. It probably limited her range in a sense. I have read many times that because the audience loved her so much, they didn't care that her accent didn't fit the movie, character, or country!

 

And, Christmas in July? Oops, I mean September? Ha! Go ahead and enjoy. I remember a time in my life when I couldn't stand to hear one more Christmas song. But, fortunately, that period past. Now, I could join you in your eccentricity!

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Hi people I have to say I have not seen a lot of her films but I am managing to see some today . I was supposed to take my son to a movie but the time conflicts with when I have to pick up my daughter at the bus . So my boy is happy eating his lunch and watching Free Willy and I am folding laundry watching Garbo flicks I can't watch them all the way through mind you but what I have been able to see I am enjoying very much . It does not take much to get drawn into her characters I watched one this morning with Clark Gable and I don't know the title I can look it up but I put it on and within minutes I was captured. I think Camille is on now and I have seen that one . Have a nice day people it is cold here and it is still raining . It will be time for hot chocolate soon . Carol

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Glad you're watching even if you can't see the whole movie. The one on now is Two-Faced Woman, which was a hugh flop even though it made a profit at the box office. She left the screen shortly after. She tried to make another film a few years later, it didn't work, and she never worked after Two-Faced Woman. It is kinda an odd film. It strips her of her glamour and mystic. They tried to make her a "modern" actress, but it failed. It is interesting to watch, even if it isn't really "Garbo!" The most interesting thing about TFW is the performance of Ruth Gordon (Harold and Maude). You don't often get to see Ruth young!

 

 

It is getting chilly here off and on, too. I can tell a change is on its way! Can't wait.

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GarboManiac,

 

I thought I might see you back (actually, I was hoping to see you back) contributing to this forum for Greta's day.

 

Now, to my opinions regarding Greta Garbo.

 

My favorite of her films is "Queen Christina".

 

Robert Taylor is just dandy with Garbo in "Camille".

 

Greta Garbo is one sexy spy in "Mata Hari" (I did watch that movie this morning).

 

The first film I noticed Greta Garbo was "Anna Christie". Starting with my third viewing of "Anna Christie", I started to like the movie. I liked Garbo from the first few minutes of watching her...oh, yeah.

 

The two part documentary, "The Temptress And The Clown" (presented last night on TCM), is a great documentary. In fact, this Swedish documentary should be required viewing by anyone thinking about, or involved in, filming documentaries.

 

Rusty

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You know, GM, that is something I've always thought about Garbo -- that her acting style is really rather old fashioned, but in a good way, so that her compelling personality always shines through. She was in no way the aggressive, clever-style actress of the 30s and 40s, but noboday cared, because she was so luminous and wonderful to look at, and believable in every part.

 

I've thought that Paul Muni was similarly "old fashioned" in his acting style, but managed to get his point across quite nicely. Consider Muni vs. EG Robinson (after "Little Caesar," which was I've always found a stylized performance). They were similarly charismatic, of similar physical type, and played similar parts, but Robinson's style was lightyears more "modern" than was Muni's. Nevertheless, they were both eminently watchable actors.

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> Glad you're watching even if you can't see the whole

> movie. The one on now is Two-Faced Woman, which was

> a hugh flop even though it made a profit at the box

> office. She left the screen shortly after. She

> tried to make another film a few years later, it

> didn't work, and she never worked after Two-Faced

> Woman. It is kinda an odd film. It strips her of

> her glamour and mystic. They tried to make her a

> "modern" actress, but it failed. It is interesting

> to watch, even if it isn't really "Garbo!"

 

I've just seen Two Faced Woman. It's the first Garbo I've seen. If, as you say, it "strips her of her glamour and mystic", I can't wait to see her other films, because I thought she was no slouch in this, especially portraying her twin sister.

 

As for the film, it's ok, maybe a little too long, started running out of steam toward the end.

 

Brad

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Hi ya, Rusty! Thanks for the welcome. I just couldn't resist today! I'm so glad you like her. She is so unique. And, you are right! That two part Swedish documentary is fantastic, and should be mimicked by American filmmakers.

 

I never get tired of watching her magic on screen, especially in her silents! And, I find that funny cause I was never into silents until I saw hers. Now, I can watch anyone's silent, but I always compare it to hers.

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Judith, that is so true. I think that Garbo, Muni, and some others developed their style early on, probably in silents (of course Garbo did), and then they never changed their style. Well, as the old saying goes, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." But, unfortunately, that is what they tried to do with her in Two-Faced Woman, and it didn't do that well, although it made money. The Church, politicians and the general public were outraged at the idea of a husband being attracted to the sister! How shocking! Ha! Oh, well. I'm glad she never did anything else if that was the direction she was headed. My personal favorite of hers is the Italian Opera Star in Romance. That is about as "old fashioned" as you can get with Garbo! But, that's what I love about her.

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This is actually in response to garbomaniac.

 

"It strips her of her glamour and mystique".

 

This is the first movie I've seen where Garbo is glamourous. Usually she has that horrible dutchboy hair style, and manish clothing. Oh they use lighting to give her that glow, which is why they say she was 'glowing' on screen, but they did the same with Doris Day to hide her freckles. I'm not knocking Garbo, God forbid, but it was nice for a change to see her glamourized.

 

Anne

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Hey, brad, long time no read! Ha! Well, actually I have been reading you on the boards in my absence, and I must say, I think you're o-k!

 

Now, as to Garbo, unfortunately, she will never be the same to you again, except maybe for Ninotchka. That is her only other light film. Most of the time she is HEAVILY dramatic and usually dies in her films. She is the Queen of the heavy sigh and furrowed brow! So, I am not sure you will like her if you liked TFW. She might come as quite a shock, as did TFW did to the general public in 1941!

 

Let me know what you think. Two more films will be on the 24th. Unfortunately, Conquest is a colossal disaster. It is, to put it mildly, long and boring. But, there is one bright side, Garbo is in the film!! Oh, yes, and Charles Boyer, who is said to be one of her few leading men who could match her performance, so for that alone it is worth watching. Grand Hotel is also on, but she plays a nervous fading ballerina. Her performance is certainly noteworthy, but a little frenzied. Nevertheless, she can do no wrong as far as I am concerned.

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Hi, Anne, thanks for the response!

 

And oh, yes! Let's not talk about Garbo's hair! I don't know why anyone would even take credit in her films for doing it. Her hair for the most part looked horrible. In Anna Karenia, Camille, Conquest, and Romance her hair was magnificent, but even in Two-Faced Woman, it just made her look old. The only time her hair looked great was during her silent period. I would say almost every film presented her hair and costumes in an artistic and star-like way. If you've ever wondered why anyone liked Garbo, all you have to do is watch one of her silents! My goodness, there was nobody like her, then or since.

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Hi! We have talked in length about Robert Taylor playing opposite Garbo. And, although many think he was unqualified and too new, nobody would argue his beauty. For a man, he was her equal (they looked beautiful together), especially with all that make-up! But, there are some of us who would have preferred Tyrone Power or Robert Donat. Interesting, huh?

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>

>

> Now, as to Garbo, unfortunately, she will never be

> the same to you again, except maybe for Ninotchka.

> That is her only other light film. Most of the time

> she is HEAVILY dramatic and usually dies in her

> films. She is the Queen of the heavy sigh and

> furrowed brow! So, I am not sure you will like her

> if you liked TFW. She might come as quite a shock,

> as did TFW did to the general public in 1941!

>

> Let me know what you think. Two more films will be

> on the 24th. Unfortunately, Conquest is a colossal

> disaster. It is, to put it mildly, long and boring.

> But, there is one bright side, Garbo is in the

> film!! Oh, yes, and Charles Boyer, who is said to

> be one of her few leading men who could match her

> performance, so for that alone it is worth watching.

> Grand Hotel is also on, but she plays a nervous

> fading ballerina. Her performance is certainly

> noteworthy, but a little frenzied. Nevertheless,

> she can do no wrong as far as I am concerned.

 

Thanks for the heads up, I'll definitely watch or tape those two. Actually, I'm usually more into drama than comedy in movies, so I might enjoy these more than Two Faced Woman.

 

Isn't Grand Hotel the one with the famous quote "I want to be alone"?

 

Brad

 

And it's good to see you back!

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Yup! I think she says it two or three times varying each phrase slightly. She says I vant to be alone, and I just vant to be alone to her ballet director. And, I think she says it once more to John Barrymore. Wow! John Barrymore and Greta Garbo, now there is a team. The two greats should have made at least one more film together, but thank heavens we have this one. Watch for the one close up when she is in his arms. It is probably the most beautiful close up of her ever filmed. Well, perhaps that is hyperbole, but it is a beautiful shot. And, you get Joan Crawford, Lionel Barrymore, Wallace Beery, Lewis Stone, and Jean Hersholt, too!

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Well, great! Although Joan and Greta don't have any scenes together, it is still great that they are both in it. There is a story about Joan coming around a corner and running smack into Garbo. Garbo smiled; Joan was stunned! Garbo looked down at her and said, "Here we are in the same picture, and we don't have any scenes together. What a pity." Joan said that if there were ever a time she would have become a lesbian, that was it! Joan said she had never really seen her up close, and when she finally did, she was astonished by her beauty.

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"...Let's not talk about Garbo's hair! I don't know why anyone would even take credit in her films for doing it. Her hair for the most part looked horrible. In Anna Karenia, Camille, Conquest, and Romance her hair was magnificent, but even in Two-Faced Woman, it just made her look old. The only time her hair looked great was during her silent period. I would say almost every film presented her hair and costumes in an artistic and star-like way."

 

I have never seen La Garbo without being awestruck. I don't think I've given a modicum of thought to her hairstyle, clothing style, nor the art direction that surrounds her. She's probably the only screen presence that affects me this way. When Garbo is on the screen, nothing else is necessary. The set could be aflame and I wouldn't notice.

 

Garbo

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