Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

A Capital Joke About THE LOST WEEKEND


Palmerin
 Share

Recommended Posts

There is this WB cartoon that features a big cast of movie stars (I wish I could remember its name). Ray Milland is at the bar, looking as woebegone as he looks in TLW. The bartender presents his bill, RM pays with a typewriter, and the bartender gives him his change in the form of tiny typewriters.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How I remember those WB cartoons!  They were broadcast on our local TV stations in Jacksonville and we loved them even in b&w.  They would be considered politically incorrect today and probably some should be but the ones with the WB actors are riots.  Mom had to identify some of them to us.  I'd like to see some of them today and compare them with the actors as I would recognize them now. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is this WB cartoon that features a big cast of movie stars (I wish I could remember its name). Ray Milland is at the bar, looking as woebegone as he looks in TLW. The bartender presents his bill, RM pays with a typewriter, and the bartender gives him his change in the form of tiny typewriters.

 

 

I think this is what you're thinking of:

 

 

 

'If it's rabbit baby wants, it's rabbit baby gets!'

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, I get the Milland/Lost Weekend bit with the typewriter, but would somebody please tell me what movie reference is being parodied just before that in this Bugs cartoon and when what looks like a caricature of Gregory Peck receiving a large steak from the waiter and then him pulling out a straight razor to cut it??? It begins at the 1:11 minute mark.

 

(...what am I missing here?!) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, I get the Milland/Lost Weekend bit with the typewriter, but would somebody please tell me what is being parodied just before that in this Bugs cartoon and when what looks like a caricature of Gregory Peck receiving a large steak from the waiter and then pulling out a straight razor to cut it??? It begins at the 1:11 minute mark.

 

(...what am I missing here?!) 

 

Gregory Peck was renowned throughout the Hollywood community for his fighting prowess with a straight razor, a skill he picked up as a gang member in Juarez, Mexico. Surely you recall the story of how Peck cut off George Raft's left ear in a fight over a bar tab, and Raft's subsequent use of a prosthetic ear for the remainder of his career?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gregory Peck was renowned throughout the Hollywood community for his fighting prowess with a straight razor, a skill he picked up as a gang member in Juarez, Mexico. Surely you recall the story of how Peck cut off George Raft's left ear in a fight over a bar tab, and Raft's subsequent use of a prosthetic ear for the remainder of his career?

 

LOL

 

Now THAT is hilarious, Lawrence! LOVE it!!!

 

No, but really. Any idea what movie reference is being parodied here? And that DOES appear to be a caricature of Peck, doesn't it?

 

(...the only other actor of the time it MIGHT resemble would be Jimmy Stewart, but I'm pretty sure it's supposed to be Greg, not Jimmy)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOL

 

Now THAT is hilarious, Lawrence! LOVE it!!!

 

No, but really. Any idea what movie reference is being parodied here? And that DOES appear to be a caricature of Peck, doesn't it?

 

(...the only other actor of the time it MIGHT resemble would be Jimmy Stewart, but I'm pretty sure it's supposed to be Greg, not Jimmy)

 

Think Spellbound, Dargo, and the razor blade Greg carries in his hand (in closeup) when the old Vienna snoozle psychiatrist is dealing with whether or not Peck's character may be a bit of a cuckoo clock client.

 

maison-du-dr-edwardes-06-g.jpg

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another question here for you folks...

 

As we make out way into the "Mocrumbo"(the 00:49 minute mark), seated at the two tables are who? Maybe George Brent and Paulette Goddard, and Joan Crawford and Errol Flynn?

 

(...or instead of Flynn, perhaps Don Ameche?) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Think Spellbound, Dargo, and the razor blade Greg carries in his hand (in closeup) when the old Vienna snoozle psychiatrist is dealing with whether or not Peck's character may be a bit of a cuckoo clock client.

 

 

 

THANK YOU, Tom! That 'splains it, alright!

 

(...now, have you seen my follow-up question here?)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another question here for you folks...

 

As we make out way into the "Mocrumbo"(the 00:49 minute mark), seated at the two tables are who? Maybe George Brent and Paulette Goddard, and Joan Crawford and Errol Flynn?

 

(...or instead of Flynn, perhaps Don Ameche?) 

 

Brent? Flynn? Ameche? There's not a moustache in sight.

 

The only guess I would make is that the beefy guy on the right hand table might be Jack Carson. Couldn't tell you who his date is, though. Crawford might be as good a guess as any since they had just been in Mildred Pierce together when this cartoon was made. If she only had a gun in her hand then you'd know for sure if was Joanie.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Milland proved he could handle a serious, meaty role. Why was he given so few of them after THE LOST WEEKEND?

 

It's true that Milland's films after his Oscar are a rather disappointing lot. However, he did play a scoundrel in So Evil My Love in 1948 and a minion of the Devil in Alias Nick Beal in 1949. Milland is quite effective in the latter film, a moody, atmospheric variation on Faust, with Audrey Totter and Thomas Mitchell as an honest politician tempted to sell his soul for the state governorship.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brent? Flynn? Ameche? There's not a moustache in sight.

 

The only guess I would make is that the beefy guy on the right hand table might be Jack Carson. Couldn't tell you who his date is, though. Crawford might be as good a guess as any since they had just been in Mildred Pierce together when this cartoon was made.

 

Yeah, Jack Carson, and for the very reason you said, sounds about right.

 

I thought the guy looked like he was sportin' a 'stache, but you're right, he wasn't.

 

(...It does seem the guy on the left is sportin' a small one though, or are my eyes still playin' tricks on me?!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, Jack Carson, and for the very reason you said, sounds about right.

 

I thought the guy looked like he was sportin' a 'stache, but you're right, he wasn't.

 

(...It does seem the guy on the left is sportin' a small one though, or are my eyes still playin' tricks on me?!)

 

I can't make out the pair on the left too well. They look like generic night clubbers to me. Someone else might have a better guess on them, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't make out the pair on the left too well. They look like generic night clubbers to me. Someone else might have a better guess on them, though.

 

Oh...suuuuure. JUST as I put ALL my faith in you, you give UP on me here, dude!!!

 

And so in THAT case, I suppose I'll have to stick with thinkin' the guy on the left IS maybe George Brent.

 

(...too bad the guy is sittin' down and ya can only see him from the waist up, huh...otherwise that COULD confirm my suspicions here, ya know!) ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's true that Milland's films after his Oscar are a rather disappointing lot. However, he did play a scoundrel in So Evil My Love in 1948 and a minion of the Devil in Alias Nick Beal in 1949. Milland is quite effective in the latter film, a moody, atmospheric variation on Faust, with Audrey Totter and Thomas Mitchell as an honest politician tempted to sell his soul for the state governorship.

 

Whaddya talking about? Is this not the man who graced us with The Thing with Two Heads ?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Think Spellbound, Dargo, and the razor blade Greg carries in his hand (in closeup) when the old Vienna snoozle psychiatrist is dealing with whether or not Peck's character may be a bit of a cuckoo clock client.

 

maison-du-dr-edwardes-06-g.jpg

 

Yes, I would say that this is exactly correct. I only saw this tonight or I could have cleared that up for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...