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Favorite movie entrances and exits


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Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers exit dancing the Piccolino into the night and into film history in Top Hat*** my heart beats so that I can hardly speak!

Their exit in The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle is even better.
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For entrances, one that I don't think has been mentioned is Ginger Rogers in Gold Diggers of 1933.

 

Monty Clift has a memorable entrance in From Here to Eternity, too.

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Everyone's mentioned many of my favorite entrances and exits already:

 

ENTRANCES:

 

Harry Lime, The Third Man

Gilda, Gilda

Ilsa Lund, Casablanca

Leslie Crosbie, The Letter

 

EXITS: 

 

Rick and Louis, Casablanca

 

---

 

Another great Casablanca entrance is the entrance of Bogart's character.  At first all we see is a closeup of Rick signing a check.  Then we see him all decked out in that iconic white dinner jacket.

 

I also love the entrance of Errol Flynn's character in The Sisters.  All we see is everyone (including Bette Davis and her sister, Anita Louise) of Silver Bow enjoying themselves at Teddy Roosevelt's election night party.  Suddenly, Flynn is spotted at the top of the stairs.  His gorgeous face looks over the crowd and then he and Davis spot each other simultaneously (don't see how Davis could miss that fox up at the top of the stairs!)

 

This isn't an entrance persay, as we'd seen the character a little earlier in the film, but when Flynn as Robin Hood enters Prince John's banquet hall with the dead deer wrapped around his shoulders, that is such a great entrance, especially when combined with Erich Wolfgang Korngold's wonderful score in The Adventures of Robin Hood.

 

Barbara Stanwyck's entrance as Phyllis Dietrichson in Double Indemnity.  She slinks out onto the top of the stairwell dressed in only a cheap blond wig, a towel, a pair of cheesy heeled slippers and an ankle bracelet.  You know from the minute she bursts onto screen that she's gonna be trouble.

 

Barbara Stanwyck's entrance in Ball of Fire is quite memorable.  She appears in a dress cut up to there, singing "Drum Boogie."  No wonder she caught Gary Cooper's eye.

 

Orson Welles saying "rosebud" in Citizen Kane.  

 

William Holden floating facedown in the pool in Sunset Blvd

 

---

 

ENDINGS:

 

Fred MacMurray's character lying in the vestibule either seriously wounded or on the verge of death.  Edward G. Robinson is there is light a cigarette for his former friend/subordinate in Double Indemnity

 

Robin Hood stating, "may I obey all your commands with equal pleasure," and leaving with Maid Marian in The Adventures of Robin Hood.

 

The Wicked of the West's fabulous exit: "I'm melting, melting! what a world! what a world!" in The Wizard of Oz

 

Gloria Swanson's Norma Desmond walking into the camera saying that she's ready for her closeup in Sunset Blvd

 

Phoebe, the "new girl in town" in All About Eve, posing in the mirrors wearing Eve's coat--ready to take Eve's place when opportunity strikes.

 

Norman Bates' mother's internal monologue at the end of Psycho

 

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Entrances don't come any better than this, for me.

 

 

 

I have to think about exits

 

The final sequence of "The Sound of Music" is pretty awesome, particularly when you consider the scenes fraught with danger just before it. 

 

 

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Last night's RIO BRAVO had some interesting entrances....in a way.....

 

Dean Martin's "Dude", as the well known drunk, greasily slinking in the back door of Nathan Burdette's saloon....

 

John Wayne entering the movie at the scene where Martin's "Dude" was just about to fish out that coin from the spitoon.  Wayne's  sheriff Chance kicking the spitoon away and the first sight of his face in the film shows a look of disgust for Martin's "Dude", obvious for what he's become.

 

Heh....it's long been one of my favorite westerns, or MOVIES as well, so I'm a bit biased.  :D

 

Sepiatone

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I always enjoy seeing John Wayne's entrance in Ford's "Stagecoach" since he does not really enter, but the stagecoach comes up upon him in a flash.

 

Very exciting visual!
 

I forgot to add for the best exit, Alida Valli walking past Joseph Cotten in "The Third Man".

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Last night's RIO BRAVO had some interesting entrances....in a way.....

 

Dean Martin's "Dude", as the well known drunk, greasily slinking in the back door of Nathan Burdette's saloon....

 

John Wayne entering the movie at the scene where Martin's "Dude" was just about to fish out that coin from the spitoon.  Wayne's  sheriff Chance kicking the spitoon away and the first sight of his face in the film shows a look of disgust for Martin's "Dude", obvious for what he's become.

 

Heh....it's long been one of my favorite westerns, or MOVIES as well, so I'm a bit biased.  :D

 

Sepiatone

One of my favorites, as well.

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This Academy Award-winning actor's entrance near the end of 1991's "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves" was supposed to be a secret. In fact, he was uncredited in the role of Britain's King Richard the Lionheart. But it didn't take long for word to get out about his participation in the film.

 

Robin-Hood-10.png

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One of my favorite entrances is in THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE, when the camera panning across the floor, John Garfield's view, following a rolling lipstick, leading up to a pair of white open-toed shoes, then up a pair of legs, then up to Lana Turner's torso, wearing a white short-short suit, with a bare midriff and turban. Quite an entrance.

 

Or another noir, similarly set in a small-town seaside California diner, FALLEN ANGEL, when a missing Linda Darnell, tired and hungry, walks in, plops herself on a chair, taking off her heels, and demands food from a relieved Percy Kilbride, who thereupon gives her Dana Andrews' hamburger.

 

Or Andrews, waking up, and thinking he is still dreaming, when Gene Tierney walks into her apartment in LAURA.

 

More recently, I love the entrance of Tim Curry in THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW, coming down on a descending platform, tapping glittery silver platform heel to the beat of "Sweet Transvestite", and the subsequent view of him in his makeup and outfit, causing Susan Sarandon to faint.

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This Academy Award-winning actor's entrance near the end of 1991's "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves" was supposed to be a secret. In fact, he was uncredited in the role of Britain's King Richard the Lionheart. But it didn't take long for word to get out about his participation in the film.

 

Robin-Hood-10.png

 

For some reason, this reminded me of------

 

GRAHAM CHAPMAN'S entrance as KING ARTHUR in

 

MONTY PYTHON and THE HOLY GRAIL

 

Being followed by TERRY GILLIAM as his servant clapping two coconut halves together to simulate hoofbeats!  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

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For some reason, this reminded me of------

 

GRAHAM CHAPMAN'S entrance as KING ARTHUR in

 

MONTY PYTHON and THE HOLY GRAIL

 

Being followed by TERRY GILLIAM as his servant clapping two coconut halves together to simulate hoofbeats!  :D

 

Funny you should mention the Pythons. Sean Connery was a big fan, and agreed to appear as King Agamemnon (of The Trojan War fame) in Gilliam's 1981 comedy/fantasy "Time Bandits."

 

190fl7wi5ml6jjpg.jpg

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**Spoilers**

 

 

In Invasion U.S.A. (1985), the villain played by Richard Lynch has a habit of shooting men in the groin, for some reason. At the end, as Lynch raises a rocket launcher to his shoulder to fire out of a window, hero Chuck Norris steps up behind him, says in slow motion "It's time", and then raises his own rocket launcher crotch level. Lynch spins around, and Norris shoots him with a rocket in the groin.

 

Hmmmm, symbolism?

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  • 3 weeks later...

It occurs to me that King Kong deserves double credit in this thread.

 

1. The entrance: Who could ever forget watching the Skull Islanders shut their gates and bang a gong, inviting Kong to collect his sacrificial lamb? As a child, I didn't know what was coming. Thank goodness, it fascinated me!

 

tumblr_njul4dpgEh1r70le6o4_500.gif

 

 

2. The exit: You can never say that Kong didn't go out like a champ!

 

king-kong-111.jpg

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Entrances?

 

Well, how about Bugs' classic "What's up Doc?" ???

 

And exits?

 

Anytime he exits a scene by tripping the light fantastic to the tune of "Shuffle Off to Buffalo", of course.

 

(...what!...you were expectin' maybe Ruby Keeler here or somethin'?) ;)

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All jokes aside - - Joan Crawford was a great movie star. Possibly the greatest female movie star of the golden era-- which included her great comeback in Mildred Pierce.

 

(Hold your horses, I didn't say she was a great actress. Movie star and actress are not necessarily the same thing.)

 

If there's anybody on this website who has not seen Humoresque, I will simply say that Joan Crawford's exit in this movie is the most beautiful exit I've ever seen in a Golden Age motion picture.

 

She's great but she didn't do it alone. Movie stars never do anything alone; it only looks that way.

 

Joan Crawford's magnificent exit was assisted by the following:

 

 

Jean Negulesco-- the director

Ernest Haller-- the cinematographer

Clifford Odets-- the screenplay writer ( original story by Fannie Hurst)

Adrian - - the costume designer

Perc Westmore--make-up artist

Gertrude Wheeler-- the hair stylist

Franz Waxman-- the music conductor

Isaac Stern - - the concert violinist

Richard Wagner-- the music composer

 

and many more.....

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Entrances?

 

Well, how about Bugs' classic "What's up Doc?" ???

 

And exits?

 

Anytime he exits a scene by tripping the light fantastic to the tune of "Shuffle Off to Buffalo", of course.

 

(...what!...you were expectin' maybe Ruby Keeler here or somethin'?) ;)

 

Dargo-- it's great to see you back!

 

I was above you and I couldn't help but see a reference to tap dancing.

 

Did you know that Shuffle off to Buffalo is not just a tune but is actually a tap step?

 

It's an exit step that is usually executed travelling to the right or to the left. It can also be executed turning.

 

So I wonder that when they play this song does Bugs actually do the Shuffle off to Buffalo tap step? I certainly would like to see that. With his feet he wouldn't need taps.

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Dargo-- it's great to see you back!

 

I was above you and I couldn't help but see a reference to tap dancing.

 

Did you know that Shuffle off to Buffalo is not just a tune but is actually a tap step?

 

It's an exit step that is usually executed travelling to the right or to the left. It can also be executed turning.

 

So I wonder that when they play this song does Bugs actually do the Shuffle off to Buffalo tap step? I certainly would like to see that. With his feet he wouldn't need taps.

 

Thanks for the welcome back, Princess.

 

I tried to find both a short video of Bugs doing his shuffling off to Buffalo exits and an animated gif of it on the net in order to show ya what I was talkin' about here, but to no avail.

 

(...but yeah, the way you described the step, that's how I remember Bugs doin' it)

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Entrances?

 

Well, how about Bugs' classic "What's up Doc?" ???

 

And exits?

 

Anytime he exits a scene by tripping the light fantastic to the tune of "Shuffle Off to Buffalo", of course.

 

(...what!...you were expectin' maybe Ruby Keeler here or somethin'?) ;)

Technically speaking, Bugs Bunny made his entrance into the movies in It Happened One Night when Clark Gable was eeating a carrot....

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